NAVY

SBIR FY10.2 PROPOSAL SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

 

 

The responsibility for the implementation, administration and management of the Navy SBIR Program is with the Office of Naval Research (ONR).  The Director of the Navy SBIR Program is Mr. John Williams, john.williams6@navy.mil.  For general inquiries or problems with electronic submission, contact the DoD Help Desk at 1-866-724-7457 (8:00 am to 5:00 pm ET).  For program and administrative questions, please contact the Program Managers listed in Table 1; do not contact them for technical questions.  For technical questions about the topic, contact the Topic Authors listed under each topic on the Web site before 19 May 2010.  Beginning 19 May, the SITIS system (http://www.dodsbir.net/Sitis/Default.asp) listed in section 1.5c of the program solicitation must be used for any technical inquiry.

 

TABLE 1: NAVY ACTIVITY SBIR PROGRAM MANAGERS POINTS OF CONTACT

 

Topic Numbers

Point of Contact

Activity

Email

N102-106 thru N102-111

Mr. Paul Lambert

MARCOR

sbir.admin@usmc.mil

N102-112 thru N102-143

Mrs. Janet McGovern

NAVAIR

navair.sbir@navy.mil

N102-144 thru N102-161

Mr. Dean Putnam

NAVSEA

dean.r.putnam@navy.mil

N102-162

Mr. John Gallagher

NAVSUP

john.p.gallagher@navy.mil

N102-163 thru N102-165

Mr. Stephen Stachmus

NSMA

stephen.stachmus@navy.mil

N102-166 thru N102-183

Mrs. Tracy Frost

ONR

tracy.frost1@navy.mil

N102-184 thru N102-191

Ms. Summer Jones

SPAWAR

summer.m.jones@navy.mil

N102-192

Mr. Robert Thorne

SSP

robert.thorne@ssp.navy.mil

 

The Navy’s SBIR Program is a mission‑oriented program that integrates the needs and requirements of the Navy’s Fleet through R&D topics that have dual‑use potential, but primarily address the needs of the Navy.  Companies are encouraged to address the manufacturing needs of the Defense Sector in their proposals. Information on the Navy SBIR Program can be found on the Navy SBIR Web site at http://www.onr.navy.mil/sbir.  Additional information pertaining to the Department of the Navy’s mission can be obtained by viewing the Web site at http://www.navy.mil

 

PHASE I GUIDELINES

 

Follow the instructions in the DoD Program Solicitation at www.dodsbir.net/solicitation for program requirements and proposal submission.  Cost estimates for travel to the sponsoring activity's facility for one day of meetings are recommended for all proposals and required for proposals submitted to MARCOR, NAVSEA, and SPAWAR.  The Navy encourages proposers to include, within the 25 page limit, an option which furthers the effort and will bridge the funding gap between Phase I and the Phase II start.  Phase I options are typically exercised upon the decision to fund the Phase II.  For NAVAIR and NAVSEA topics N102-112 thru N102-161 the base amount should not exceed $80,000 and 6 months; the option should not exceed $70,000 and 6 months. For all other Navy topics the base effort should not exceed $70,000 and 6 months; the option should not exceed $30,000 and 3 months.   PROPOSALS THAT HAVE A HIGHER DOLLAR AMOUNT THAN ALLOWED FOR THAT TOPIC WILL BE CONSIDERED NON-RESPONSIVE.

 

The Navy will evaluate and select Phase I proposals using the evaluation criteria in section 4.2 of the DoD solicitation in descending order of importance with technical merit being most important, followed by the qualifications, and followed by commercialization potential.  Due to limited funding, the Navy reserves the right to limit awards under any topic and only proposals considered to be of superior quality will be funded.

 

One week after solicitation closing, e-mail notifications that proposals have been received and processed for evaluation will be sent.  Consequently, e-mail addresses on the proposal coversheets must be correct

 

The Navy typically awards a firm fixed price contract or a small purchase agreement for Phase I.

 

PHASE I SUMMARY REPORT

 

In addition to the final report required in the funding agreement, all awardees must electronically submit a non-proprietary summary of that report (and without any proprietary or data rights markings) through the Navy SBIR Web site.  Following the template provided on the site, submit the summary at: http://www.onr.navy.mil/sbir, click on “Submission”, and then click on “Submit a Phase I or II Summary Report”.  This summary will be publicly accessible via the Navy’s Search Database.

 

NAVY FAST TRACK DATES AND REQUIREMENTS

 

The Fast Track application must be received by the Navy 150 days from the Phase I award start date.  Phase II Proposal must be submitted within 180 days of the Phase I award start date.  Any Fast Track applications or proposals not meeting these dates may be declined.  All Fast Track applications and required information must be sent to the Technical Point of Contact for the contract and to the appropriate Navy Activity SBIR Program Manager listed in Table 1 above.  The information required by the Navy, is the same as the information required under the DoD Fast Track described in section 4.5 of this solicitation.

 

PHASE II GUIDELINES

 

Phase II proposal submission, other than Fast Track, is by invitation only.  If you have been invited, follow the instructions in the invitation.  Each of the Navy Activities has different instructions for Phase II submission.  Visit the Web site cited in the invitation to get specific guidance before submitting the Phase II proposal. 

 

The Navy will invite, evaluate and select Phase II proposals using the evaluation criteria in section 4.3 of the DoD solicitation in descending order of importance with technical merit being most important, followed by the qualifications, and followed by commercialization potential.  Due to limited funding, the Navy reserves the right to limit awards under any topic and only proposals considered to be of superior quality will be funded.

 

Under the new OSD (AT&L) directed Commercialization Pilot Program (CPP), the Navy SBIR Program will be structuring more of our Phase II contracts in a way that allows for increased funding levels based on the projects transition potential.  This will be done through either multiple options that may range from $250,000 to $1M each, substantial expansions to the existing contract, or a second Phase II award.  For currently existing Phase II contracts, the goals of the CPP will primarily be attained through contract expansions, some of which may significantly exceed the $750,000 recommended limits for Phase II awards not identified as a CPP project.  All projects in the CPP will include notice of such status in their Phase II contract modifications.

 

All awardees, during the second year of the Phase II, must attend a one-day Transition Assistance Program (TAP) meeting.  This meeting is typically held in the summer in the Washington, D.C. area.  Information can be obtained at http://www.dawnbreaker.com/navytap.  Awardees will be contacted separately regarding this program.  It is recommended that Phase II cost estimates include travel to Washington, D.C. for this event.

 

As with the Phase I award, Phase II award winners must electronically submit a Phase II summary (without any proprietary or data rights markings) through the Navy SBIR Web site at the end of their Phase II. 

 

A Navy Activity will not issue a Navy SBIR Phase II award to a company when the elapsed time between the completion of the Phase I award and the actual Phase II award date is eight (8) months or greater; unless the process and the award have been formally reviewed and approved by the Navy SBIR Program Office.  Also, any SBIR Phase I contract that has been extended by a no cost extension beyond one year will be ineligible for a Navy SBIR Phase II award using SBIR funds.

 

The Navy typically awards a cost plus fixed fee contract or an Other Transaction Agreement for Phase II.

 

PHASE II ENHANCEMENT

 

The Navy has adopted a Phase II Enhancement Plan to encourage transition of Navy SBIR funded technology to the Fleet.  Since Phase III awards are permitted during Phase II work, the Navy may match on a one-to-four ratio, SBIR funds to funds that the company obtains from an acquisition program, usually up to $250,000.  The SBIR enhancement funds may only be provided to the existing Phase II contract.  If you have questions, please contact the Navy Activity SBIR Program Manager.

 

PHASE III

 

A Phase III SBIR award is any work that derives from, extends or logically concludes effort(s) performed under prior SBIR funding agreements, but is funded by sources other than the SBIR Program.  Thus, any contract or grant where the technology is the same as, derived from, or evolved from a Phase I or a Phase II SBIR/STTR contract and awarded to the company which was awarded the Phase I/II SBIR is a Phase III SBIR contract.  This covers any contract/grant issued as a follow-on Phase III SBIR award or any contract/grant award issued as a result of a competitive process where the awardee was an SBIR firm that developed the technology as a result of a Phase I or Phase II SBIR.  The Navy will give SBIR Phase III status to any award that falls within the above-mentioned description, which includes according SBIR Data Rights to any noncommercial technical data and/or noncommercial computer software delivered in Phase III that was developed under SBIR Phase I/II effort(s).  The government’s prime contractors and/or their subcontractors shall follow the same guidelines as above and ensure that companies operating on behalf of the Navy protect rights of the SBIR company.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

 

Proposals submitted with Federal Government organizations (including the Naval Academy, Naval Post Graduate School, or any other military academy) as subcontractors will be subject to approval by the Small Business Administration (SBA) after selection and prior to award.

 

Any contractor proposing research that requires human, animal and recombinant DNA use is advised to view requirements at Web site http://www.onr.navy.mil/sci_tech/ahd_usage.asp. This Web site provides guidance and notes approvals that may be required before contract/work may begin.

 


PHASE I PROPOSAL SUBMISSION CHECKLIST: 

 

All of the following criteria must be met or your proposal will be REJECTED.

 

____1. Make sure you have added a header with company name, proposal number and topic number to each page of your technical proposal.

 

____2.  Your technical proposal has been uploaded and the DoD Proposal Cover Sheet, the DoD Company Commercialization Report, and the Cost Proposal have been submitted electronically through the DoD submission site by 6:00 a.m. ET, 23 June 2010.

 

____3. After uploading your file and it is saved on the DoD submission site, review it to ensure that it appears correctly.

 

____4. For NAVAIR and NAVSEA topics N102-112 thru N102-161, the base effort does not exceed $80,000 and 6 months and the option does not exceed $70,000 and 6 months.  For all other proposals, the Phase I proposed cost for the base effort does not exceed $70,000 and 6 months and for the option $30,000 and 3 months.  The costs for the base and option are clearly separate, and identified on the Proposal Cover Sheet, in the cost proposal, and in the work plan section of the proposal.


NAVY SBIR 10.2 Topic Index

 

 

N102-106                              High Strength  Stress Corrosion Resistant Aluminum Casting Alloys

N102-107                              Autonomous Maintenance and Health Monitoring of Rechargeable Batteries

N102-108                              Modular Lightweight External Fuel Tank System

N102-109                              Expeditionary Matting/Soil Stabilization System (EMS3)

N102-110                              Cooling/Thermal Management System Development for Active Denial Technology

(ADT) and High-Power Radio-Frequency vehicle Stopper (RF) Systems

N102-111                              Ground Tactical Vehicle Prognostics and Health Management

N102-112                              Large Diameter, Light Weight Bearing Liners

N102-113                              Innovative Capability to Quantify Fatigue Damage and Assessment of Endurance Limit

in Spectrum Load Histories

N102-114                              Innovative Thermoelectric Cooling Augmentation for E-2D Liquid Cooling System

N102-115                              Magnetic Gears for Utility Actuation Gearbox Applications

N102-116                              Geospecific Displacement Maps for Real Time, Stereoscopic Training Simulation

N102-117                              Glide Away Precision Sonobuoy

N102-118                              28GHz-43GHz Nadir/Near-Nadir (~70-90 degrees wrt horizontal) Low Probability of

Intercept Radio Frequency Direction Finding/GeoLocation Capability

N102-119                              Miniature Portable Ultra-Cold Atom Source without Active Pumps

N102-120                              Inherent Electrical Conductivity in Qualified Aircraft Transparency Materials

N102-121                              Carbon Nanotube Coaxial Transmission Lines

N102-122                              Gear Hobbing Predictive Model

N102-123                              Integrated Chip Optical CDMA for Transport Layer Security

N102-124                              Affordable, Reconfigurable Aerial Refueling Part-Task Trainer

N102-125                              Nanoparticles for Mid-Infrared Heat Source

N102-126                              Detection and Discrimination of Large-Scale Subsurface Generated Ocean Perturbations 

N102-127                              Non-Chemical Means of Stripping Hard Chrome Plate

N102-128                              Predictions of the Acoustic Nearfield on a Carrier Deck

N102-129                              Advanced Solid State Memory Conversion with Advance On-board Test Capability

N102-130                              Multi-Polarization Inverse Synthetic-Aperture Radar (ISAR) for Automated Ship and

                                                Small Craft Classification

N102-131                              Increased Target Selectivity Harpoon Seeker

N102-132                              Heat Resistant Visual Landing Aid (VLA) Lighting Fixtures for Ship Flight Decks and

Expeditionary Air Field (EAF) Matting

N102-133                              Aeroacoustics of High-Speed Jet Impingement

N102-134                              Low-Cost Compact Magnetometers for Air and In-Water Anti Submarine Warfare

(ASW)

N102-135                              Rain Repellency for Shipboard Aircraft Transparency

N102-136                              Non-Destructive Inspection Tool to Measure Sustained Stresses in Metallic Components to Assess Environmentally Assisted Cracking Susceptibility

N102-137                              Near Infrared Lasers for High Energy Laser Applications

N102-138                              Low Cost G-cues for Pilot Training Device

N102-139                              Exploiting Multipath for Efficient Target Classification

N102-140                              Bistatic Radar Receiver/Processor

N102-141                              Non Destructive Material Case Depth Verification

N102-142                              Improved Gear Carburization Process

N102-143                              Nondestructive Inspection Technique Capable of Detecting and Characterizing Bridging

N102-144                              Hazardous Material Satellite Storage Lockers

N102-145                              Enabling netted sensor fusion for anti-submarine warfare in uncertain and variable

environments

N102-146                              Field powder coating application

N102-147                              Develop Valid Performance Measures for Multi-tasking Environments

N102-148                              Develop Radar Radome Materials, Processes and Test Methodology

N102-149                              Novel Materials for Small and Medium Caliber Projectiles

N102-150                              Broad Band Fiber Lasers (Wavelength of ~500nm to 1800nm)

N102-151                              Innovative Ship/Aircraft Analytic Securing and Positioning Algorithms

N102-152                              Near Field Passive Tracking

N102-153                              Innovative materials/manufacturing for a prototype 600-1000VDC DC/DC Converter for

Shipboard Radar

N102-154                              Collaborative Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Threat Assessment

N102-155                              Towed Array Fishing Net Entanglement Prevention or Damage Reduction

N102-156                              Integrity and Authentication of Real-Time Data in Navy Combat Systems

N102-157                              Light High-Speed Amphibious Vehicle

N102-158                              Intelligent Agents for ASW Threat Prosecution

N102-159                              Consolidated Apertures with Co-site Interference Reduction in the Frequency Range 2 to

30 MHz

N102-160                              Low Maintenance, Low Cost Valves

N102-161                              Flexible Electronic Cooling Water (ECW) Piping Interfaces

N102-162                              Shipboard Clothes Dryers, “Green Technology”

N102-163                              High Strength, Optical Quality Spinel

N102-164                              Large-Area, Monolithic Reconnaissance Window

N102-165                              Optically Precise Conformal Sensor Window

N102-166                              Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM) of Metallic Components: Controlled Thermal

                                                Processing

N102-167                              Magnetic materials with strong ferromagnetic precession properties and low damping

                                                factors

N102-168                              Integrated blade tip lighting system for rotorcraft

N102-169                              Advanced Reference Cells for Corrosion Control Systems

N102-170                              Neck Load Simulation During Individual Warfighting Postures and Maneuvers

N102-171                              Compact Control Module for Short Towed Arrays

N102-172                              Advanced Flight Controls for Ultra-agile Small Unmanned Air Vehicles

N102-173                              Fire Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction Tool for Aluminum Ship Structures

                                                During and After Fire

N102-174                              Development and scale-up of very low-cost, light-weight, flexible solar cells

N102-175                              Automatic Data Representation, Analysis, and Visualization

N102-176                              Disambiguation of Entity Association Statements

N102-177                              Natural Language Dialogue for Supervisory Control of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

N102-178                              Combined electricity production and cryocooling

N102-179                              Artificial Tissue Matrices for Bone Repair

N102-180                              Connecting Disparate Documents Enabled by Semantic Search

N102-181                              Acoustic Vector Projector Technology

N102-182                              Compact, lightweight Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) with robust navigation

                                                and range for riverine reconnaissance

N102-183                              Scalable Dynamic Matrix Completion for Information Processing and Link Discovery

N102-184                              Isolation Techniques for Untrusted Software

N102-185                              HUMINT-> Multi-INT Fusion Tool (HMFT)

N102-186                              Wideband Low-loss Tunable Band-Pass Filter (BPF)

N102-187                              Spectrum Fragmentation of Networking Waveforms with Distributed Network Control

N102-188                              Network Manager Capability Enhancement

N102-189                              Advanced Reconfigurable Communications Components

N102-190                              Multipaction Mitigation

N102-191                              High-Performance Power Energy Device for Radio Applications

N102-192                              Innovative Inertial Acceleration Sensing Technologies


NAVY SBIR 10.2 Topic Descriptions

 

 

N102-106                              TITLE: High Strength  Stress Corrosion Resistant Aluminum Casting Alloys

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PM Advanced Amphibious Assault - ACAT I

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop castable and weldable high strength stress corrosion resistant aluminum alloys for the production of structural cast components.

 

DESCRIPTION: The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is pursuing high-performance aluminum castings for components, such as the steering bucket and the waterjet inlet housing, of the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV). Aluminum alloy A206 is one alloy that has been used.  This alloy is susceptible to hot tearing during casting and has inferior stress-corrosion cracking resistance.  There is a need for a design-for-castability effort to develop mechanistic material models.  These models will enable computational alloy design within this system, including a custom thermodynamic database; precipitation models coupled with strength models; solidification simulations to address innoculation, hot-tearing, and homogenization issues; and qualitative models of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC).  Using the modeling approach, the SBIR contractor shall develop and produce castable and weldable high-strength stress-corrosion resistant aluminum alloys for the production of structural cast components, such as the EFV water jet inlet housing or steering bucket.  The target component of this SBIR project shall be determined at the Kick Off meeting, but the waterjet inlet housing is a higher priority if cost constraints accommodate this choice.  The developed alloy strength, fatigue, and stress corrosion properties must meet or exceed the A206 Aluminum Alloy properties.  The developed alloy must also be castable, with no hot cracking or hot shortness propensity and must be weldable.

 

PHASE I: The contractor shall conduct modeling to investigate the chemistry, thermodynamics, and heat treatments to develop castable and weldable high-strength, stress-corrosion resistant aluminum alloys with superior hot cracking resistance, that can be used to produce large structural components.  The contractor shall plan and carry out testing to assist in the down selection of the chemistry and the alloys that could be carried into the Phase II effort.  The Contractor shall conduct a Kick-off and a Final Review meeting at the Program Office.

 

PHASE II: In the Phase II effort, the contractor shall down select the chemistry with further testing to insure meeting the required strength and stress corrosion resistance properties, as well as the castability and weldability.  The contractor shall produce prototype test components to evaluate castability and weldability.  Based on the results, the contractor shall scale up his efforts to produce components, such as the waterjet inlet housing or the steering bucket, with waterjet inlet housing as the priority item.  The contractor shall produce prototype components by casting. Various tests, including mechanical, corrosion, and welding shall be performed.  Based on the results, the contractor shall produce additional castings of the components, and these castings shall be machined, painted, and delivered for on-vehicle testing by the government. The Contractor shall conduct a Kick-off, three semi-annual reviews, and a Final Review meeting at the Program Office.

 

PHASE III: Transition technology into EFV for Low Rate Initial Production.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The cast high strength aluminum alloy and the casting technology should enable many platforms to utilize this alloy and approach for several major military land and aircraft programs.  This alloy would find extensive application in the automotive industry, as the comparative alloy A206 is a commercial alloy used in the automobile industry, as well as in the commercial aircraft industry.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  PM AAA Website - www.efv.usmc.mil

 

2.  SAE AMS 4235

 

KEYWORDS: High Strength Aluminum Alloys; Castable; Weldable; Stress Corrosion Resistant; A 206 aluminum alloy; Inlet Housing; Steering Bucket

 

 

 

N102-107                              TITLE: Autonomous Maintenance and Health Monitoring of Rechargeable Batteries

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes, Electronics

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PM EPS, ACAT IV

 

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this topic is to eliminate the logistical problems associated with self discharge of rechargeable batteries while in storage aboard Amphibs, MPF ships, and at ground based storage facilities.  A second objective is to rapidly, and cost effectively, determine the state of health (SOH) of a large number of batteries during storage.

 

DESCRIPTION: As the use of rechargeable batteries become more and more prevalent within the DoD the logistical burden of these batteries are growing.  One logistical burden is in storage and maintenance of these batteries.  All rechargeable batteries have a self discharge rate which slowly drains batteries of energy while in storage.  This self discharge rate is variable and depends on battery chemistry, battery design, storage time, and storage conditions.  If rechargeable batteries are allowed to remain at an extremely low state of charge (SOC) due to self discharge for a long period of time, the batteries can become permanently damaged and must be disposed of.  Due to the high volume of batteries used by the DoD it becomes impractical from a time, safety and cost prospective for the Marine Corps to perform maintenance recharges on all stored batteries every 3 to 6 months.  In addition several locations, such as ship platforms, currently prohibit charging of lithium batteries due to safety concerns adding to the logistical problems. 

 

What is needed is an autonomous battery maintenance technology that will help to maintain batteries in a safety and controlled manner while undergoing long term storage aboard ship or in a warehouse environment.  This technology should be able to remove any safety impacts to the storage facility if battery where to enter a thermal runaway event.  The technology should also compensate for self discharge rates within the battery, require no significant manpower to operate or maintain the batteries, autonomously recognize and maintain a wide variety of lithium batteries, have an minimal overall impact to cost, and does not alter the battery when being used during deployment.  In addition to an autonomous battery maintenance device it is also desired that the system is easily monitored by the depot workers to help rapidly determine the health of a large quantity of batteries.

 

Technology areas of interest for this topic include but are not limited to energy harvesting, “Bat Cave” development, battery hazard mitigation technology, RFID, battery health monitoring, novel storage techniques, large scale-low power-long distance inductive charging, and other technology that might solve the above stated problem.

 

This topic seeks innovative scientific and engineering solutions. Of particular interest are initiatives with a clear business case.  Proposals should specifically describe the technology that will be applied to solve the problem, how it will be developed, what the estimated benefits will be and how it might be transitioned into the DoD. 

 

Proposals under this topic must address integration of the technology into a battery storage facility. 

 

PHASE I: At the completion of Phase I there shall be a feasibility study, energy consumption models, technical characteristics, and a cost analysis of the design.  Develop and demonstrate breadboard design of key technology components.  Include a first order Return-On-Investment (ROI) analysis for implementation and estimate potential Total Ownership Cost (TOC) reduction. Establish Phase II performance goals and key developmental milestones.

 

PHASE II: Finalize the design and demonstrate a working prototype of the proposed system. Perform laboratory tests to validate the performance characteristics established in Phase I. Develop a detailed plan and method of implementation into a full-scale application.

 

PHASE III: Implement the Phase III plan developed in Phase II.  Prepare a manufacturing plan and marketing plan to sell this product to the government as well as the private sector.  Make the necessary teaming arrangements with the manufacturers of the components used in this product.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Autonomous maintenance and storage monitoring technology is applicable to almost every commercial industry.  In addition to battery storage this technology could be used in the healthcare industry, automotive industry, as well as the aviation industry.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Linden, Handbook of Battery, http://www.marcorsyscom.usmc.mil/sites/pmeps/

 

KEYWORDS: battery, RFID tag, autonomous, battery maintenance, energy scavenging, rechargeable battery, Battery safety, Bat Cave

 

 

 

N102-108                              TITLE: Modular Lightweight External Fuel Tank System

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PM Advanced Amphibious Assault - ACAT I

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE:  Research, develop and build a survivable lightweight modular external fuel tank.

 

DESCRIPTION:  The Marine Corps EFV is a 78,200 lb armored, tracked troop carrier designed to operate over harsh off-road terrain and in oceans and rivers. The EFV design space is limited due to competing requirements: 1) high water speed, 2) combat effectiveness and carrying capacity, and 3) survivability. The external fuel tanks meet functional requirements through a combination of currently available fuel system technologies; weight however is critical to an amphibious vehicle, therefore a lighter solution is beneficial.  The current external tank system consists of two 134 gallon tanks that weigh a total of 980 lbs.  A weight savings of up to 360 lbs is desired. The external tank system shall be self sealing against 14.5mm API threats. 

 

The modular fuel tank system shall reduce the effects of hydraulic ram and fire produced by impacts from RPG type munitions, larger API projectiles and fragmenting munitions.  The selected external tank system must demonstrate the ability to function in extreme operating environments which include but are not limited to -25°F to +125°F, hot dessert blowing sand, full salt water immersion and immersion in petroleum based liquids.  Ideally the design should incorporate a self-sealing polymeric material, for example polyurea. The construction materials should be compatible with an aluminum structure in a salt water environment (aluminum, plastic, composite, titanium, etc.). Bladder technology is not an option and will not be considered.  The fuel tank system must be able to be integrated into the existing EFV design with consideration given to other external tanked vehicles such as tactical vehicles and trucks.

 

PHASE I:  The contractor shall conduct research and generate options for lightweight modular external tank systems for use on the EFV, keeping in mind the environment when selected.  The contractor shall down select to one approach and create a conceptual design including estimated weight, cost and performance characteristics.

 

PHASE II:  The contractor shall manufacture test articles representative of the external tank and conduct ballistic testing to validate their design meets the EFV specified performance level and characterizes the performance.

 

PHASE III:  Transition technology into EFV for Low Rate Initial Production. Private Sector Use of Technology:  Successful development and characterization of lightweight modular fuel tank systems has direct application to a wide variety of protective requirements for uses in various military and commercial land, sea, and airbased vehicles. This technology is also applicable to the protection of storage containers.  This technology is directly applicable to large military vehicles such as the Army’s BCT Modernization, USMC MPC and retrofits to fielded ground combat and tactical vehicles, such as, the MRAP family of vehicles.

 

REFERENCES:

 1. EFV S/SS Specification Rev P. dated 09 March, 2009 (available upon request)

 

2. MIL-STD-810F Environmental Test Methods and Engineering Guidelines

 

3. MIL-STD-889B Dissimilar Metals

 

4. MIL-STD-662F V50 Ballistic Test for Armor

 

5. AR 70-75 Survivability of Army Personnel and Materials

 

6. STANAG 4569

7. Drawing and dimension of current external fuel system. (Uploaded in SITIS 5/25/10.)

 

KEYWORDS: Materials; Fuel Tanks; Fire Prevention; Survivability

 

 

 

N102-109                              TITLE: Expeditionary Matting/Soil Stabilization System (EMS3)

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PM ES, ACAT IV

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a lightweight, durable, rapidly deployable, and low cost matting/soil stabilization system that will enable wheeled military traffic to traverse loose sand and soft soil.

 

DESCRIPTION: Mobility matting systems have been used by commercial industry and military forces for decades, providing support for vehicles, personnel and equipment when the ground alone is insufficient.  All new Tactical Wheeled Vehicles are now armored which has significantly increased their weight and ground pressure. The Marine Corps requires an EMS3 that can enable passage across soft terrain features and improve vehicle mobility.  A lightweight matting system is needed that can be rapidly deployed to improve force projection within the operating environment.  Current matting/soil stabilization systems: lack the strength to support the loads imposed by military equipment, fail to meet the required rates of deployment and exceed weight/volume limitations.

 

PHASE I: The contractor shall prepare and present at least three design concepts to the government for systems that will support the heaviest Marine Corps wheeled vehicles.  The pros and cons of each concept shall be identified to include: estimated weight, rate of deployment and cost.  The contractor shall complete the design and produce a sample of at least one concept selected by the government.

 

PHASE II: The contractor shall take the design concept(s) approved in Phase I and complete a manufacturing plan that demonstrates the product(s) can be economically produced. The contractor shall produce enough of the product to cover a 160 linear feet, 12 feet wide, of each concept selected in phase I for government testing. The contractor shall observe the tests and provide recommendations for design changes that may improve performance. The contractor shall produce an additional quantity, with design changes, to cover 160 linear feet of at lease one product for follow on government testing.

 

PHASE III: The contractor shall prepare a marketing plan and refine the manufacturing plan to sell his product to the government as well as the private sector. The contractor will make any necessary teaming arrangements with other product manufacturers/suppliers to produce the matting/soil stabilization system in bulk.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: EMS3 can be used for disaster relief operations, emergency rescue services, temporary construction access and temporary parking lots.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, Expedient Road Construction Over Soft Soils  ERDC/GSL TR-01-7

 

2.  US Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, Evaluation of Expeditionary mat Surfacings for Beach Roads  ERDC/GSL TR-07-1

 

3.  http://www.almc.army.mil/alog/issues/JanFeb02/MS698.htm

 

KEYWORDS: Expeditionary Roads, enhanced mobility, matting systems, logistics-over-the-shore, beach crossing, temporary road.

 

 

 

N102-110                              TITLE: Cooling/Thermal Management System Development for Active Denial

                                                Technology (ADT) and High-Power Radio-Frequency vehicle Stopper (RF) Systems

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes, Electronics, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Program - ACAT III

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a new novel Cooling/Thermal Management System design that reduces the current size, cost, and weight of the existing thermal management subsystems by a factor of 2 and still meet full system performance specifications.  These new Thermal Management designs should be capable of achieving the performance specifications shown below for the following Directed Energy Systems, such as the 95 GHz GaN Solid State Arrays and the the High-Power Radio-Frequency vehicle Stopper (RF) Systems. 

Required Thermal Management Performance Specifications:

Vapor Compression System

• 18-200 kW dissipation required

• 12,000 W/ft3 (no condenser)

• 500 W/lb (no condenser)

• 75,000 W/ft3 for condenser

• Operating temperature range: -25 °F to 120 °F

• Operates off DC voltage

• 50/50 ethylene glycol/water (EGW) or propylene glycol/water (PGW) coolant

Radiator System

• 200 kW dissipation required

• 150 °F max into radiator

• 50/50 EGW or PGW coolant

• 2 pass system

• 225 W/lb

• 8,300 W/ft2

• Operating temperature range: -25 °F to 120 °F

• Operates off DC voltage

• Air pressure drop: 0.347 in H2O

• Fluid pressure drop: 9.31 psi

 

DESCRIPTION: Develop a next-generation Thermal Management system which reduces the current state-of the art for size, wieght, and cost by a factor of 2.  The contractor is to consider several special new materials as recently demonstrated in this field of engineering.  This light-weight cooling/thermal management system is required for integration into a high-power, solid-state ADT array system, which integrates into small, tactical vehicles and vessels. A variant of this novel next-generation thermal management/cooling system is also needed for integration with mobile, high-power, RF vehicle stopper systems (to cool 1-30 kw magnetron HPM systems). A notional example of such a next-generation cooling system consists of a vapor compression refrigeration system (VCRS), an integrated phase-change material (PCM) heat exchanger to level the cooling load on the VCRS, and an auxiliary cooling loop (ACL) to transport the heat dissipated in the ADT or RF system to the PCM.  The objective is to develop new subsystem designs for the systems described above to lead to an overall reductions in size, weight, and cost by a facor of 2 and still meet the system performance requirements shown above. 

 

PHASE I: Develop a next generation Cooling/Thermal Management System design which meets the desired improved system performance specifications provided above. The preliminary next-generation thermal management/cooling system environmental and performance specifications must be established and documented to meet current next-generation Directed Energy Weapon systems, such as the ADT (mm-wave) system and the 30 kW vehicle stopper system. These requirements will be used to define the overall cooling/thermal management system architecture for many programs and will be flowed down to develop requirements and interface specifications for each of these program subsystems. Physical parameters for each USMC/Navy Directed Energy Weapon source will be provided at SBIR award.

 

PHASE II: Fabricate and test this new novel Cooling/Thermal Management design as integrated on two existing USMC/USN non-lethal Directed Energy Weapons.  Conduct system analysis and design tradeoffs. The primary objectives of the system analysis are to assist in developing the specification for the PCM heat exchanger and to verify the sizing of the VCRS and the ACL. The system analysis and design trade studies should include the thermodynamic and heat transport calculations.

 

PHASE III: Integrate and test this novel design into current PCM heat exchange designs in existing JNLWD-developed non-lethal Directed Energy Weapon systems. Develop a new PCM heat exchanger design for the integrated cooling system including materials specification, fabrication approach, and performance prediction modeling. A method for verifying PCM heat exchanger performance through testing should be developed and documented.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This technology could be used by any branch of the military or by civilian forces as a subsystem required for a reduced size, highly mobile cooling system.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Ahuja, A. S., “Augmentation of Heat Transport in Laminar Flow of Polystyrene Suspensions. I. Experiments and Results,” Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 46, No. 8, (Aug. 1975), pp. 3408-3416.

 

2. Ibid, pp. 3417-3425.

 

3. Charunyakorn, P. et al., “Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurries: Flow in Circular Ducts,” Int J Heat Mass Transfer, vol. 34, No. 3, (1991), pp. 819-833.

 

4. Charunyakorn, P., et al., “Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurries: Flow between Parallel Plates,” ASME HTD-vol. 129, General Papers: Phase Change and Convective Heat Transfer, ASME, AIAA/ASME Thermophysics and Heat Transfer Conference, Seattle, Washington, (Jun. 18-20, 1990), pp. 55-62.

 

5. Cho, Keumnam, et al., “Thermal Characteristics of Paraffin in a Spherical Capsule during Freezing and Melting Process”, Int J Heat Mass Transfer, vol. 43 (2000), pp. 3183-3196.

 

6. Cho, Young I., et al., “Development of Advanced Low-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for District Heating and Cooling,” Report No. DOE/CE/26592-2, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Agreement No. DE-FG01-89CE26592, (Mar. 31, 1999), 10 pgs.

 

7. Cho, K., et al., “Comparison of Thermal Characteristics of a Test MCM Using Water, PF-5060 and Paraffin Slurry,” EEP-vol.26-2, Advances in Electronic Packaging, vol. 2, (199), pp. 1499-1505.

 

KEYWORDS: non-lethal weapon; Thermal Management System; cooling syste; high-power microwave, heat exchanger, Active Denial System

 

 

 

N102-111                              TITLE: Ground Tactical Vehicle Prognostics and Health Management

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Autonomic Logistics (potential I), Embedded Platform Logistics System (IV)

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: This topic seeks technology to identify maintenance trends in both platforms/components and prognostics to determine the likelihood that any one particular vehicle/system or tactical grouping of vehicles/systems will complete its assigned mission.

 

DESCRIPTION: Aging systems, spare parts shortages, and high operating tempo are placing increasing pressure on the material readiness of our force.  The long-term sustainability of the equipment is a continuing challenge requiring new initiatives to effectively address both equipment and mission readiness.  With the implementation of the Embedded Platform Logistics System (EPLS) on USMC ground tactical vehicles, the monitoring and collection of system/subsystem/assembly mission critical data elements is now available for further analysis.  To realize the full potential of this data, further research and development of tools to analyze datasets for trends and projected performance is needed.  The ability to mine, process, mechanically model and statistically analyze this aggregated data from a fleet perspective to determine maintenance trends, failure mechanisms, support system lifecycle management, and better understand the probability that an item of equipment will/will not fail over the course of a mission has significant benefit to the operating forces.  Such prognostic and trend analysis tools would significantly enhance the capabilities provided by the Autonomic Logistics Program of Record and provide the warfighter with an application-level tool to support tactical decision making and improve mission performance of sensor-equipped vehicles.

 

PHASE I: 1) Develop and construct a set of statistical analysis tools (algorithms, models, data mining techniques, etc.) for identifying maintenance trends. 2) Develop and construct a set of prognostic tools (algorithms, models, etc.) for determining remaining useful life.

 

PHASE II: Develop proof-of-concept demonstrators based on a set of realistic, operationally based scenarios and mission profiles.

 

PHASE III: Integrate proof-of-concept demonstrators with existing application(s).

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Equipment reliability and availability are significant aspects of commercial product success.  Application of statistical trending and/or prognostic tools during both the design process and/or as an embedded attribute of the final product leads to a product line that incorporates machine learning to improve overall product performance.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Capability Development Document for Autonomic Logistics – Marine Corps

 

2. Capability Development Document for Electronic maintenance Support System

 

3. Initial Capability Document for Sense and Respond Logistics

 

4. Condition Based Maintenance Plus DOD Guidebook

 

KEYWORDS: Prognostics, statistical analysis, algorithm, data mining, data analysis, trending, decision support tools, prediction, remaining useful life

 

 

 

N102-112                              TITLE: Large Diameter, Light Weight Bearing Liners

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA 261 H-53 Heavy Lift Helicopters Program

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop innovative and low cost materials/processes for fabricating large-diameter, light weight, mass producible bearing liners.

 

DESCRIPTION: The drive system of the CH-53K consists of 5 gearboxes; the largest of those is the main gearbox (MGB) which transmits the power from the engines to the main and tail rotors.  Within the main gearbox, there are three different part numbered bearing liners that are 9 to 20 inches in diameter. Bearing liners are sacrificial sleeves that are pinned into aluminum or magnesium gearbox housings.  Bearings are then interference fit into the bearing liners.

 

The bearing liners are currently 4320 alloy steel and they account for an accumulated weight of approximately 13 pounds. The goal is to reduce the weight of the bearing liners.  The material should have properties equal to or better than 4320 steel, including fretting resistance, lighter weight, and no galvanic interaction with environment or mating materials.  Manufacturing costs should be comparable or less than current costs, while still providing consistent quality parts in production quantities.  The current large bearings liners are heat treated to 125,000 psi ultimate tensile strength with a Rockwell C Hardness of 23-33. 

 

PHASE I: Determine feasibility of proposed bearing liner material maintaining or exceeding current requirements while reducing weight.

 

PHASE II: Construct and demonstrate prototype bearing liner with new material.

 

PHASE III: Manufacture final version of bearing liners and conduct flight testing. It is anticipated that the small company would need to partner with an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM).

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Bearing liners are used throughout the industry, not only on aircraft but various other industrial gearboxes and equipment.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Joint Services Specification Guide (JSSG)-2009 - Air Vehicle Subsystems.  Appendix K.  http://www.everyspec.com/DoD/DoD+PUBLICATIONS/JSSG-2009_10207/

 

2.  AISI 4320 - Steel.  http://www.matweb.com/search/search.aspx

 

KEYWORDS: Bearing Liner; Material; Lightweight; Gearbox; Transmission; Manufacturing

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-113                              TITLE: Innovative Capability to Quantify Fatigue Damage and Assessment of Endurance

Limit in Spectrum Load Histories

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-261; H-53 Heavy Lift Helicopters Program

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate an innovative approach to quantify damage from high frequency load content in long spectrum load histories through an analytical model.

 

DESCRIPTION: The extent of damage contributed by small amplitude cycles in the spectrum loading histories of aircraft and rotorcraft structures is not fully understood; it is either ignored completely or a conservative damage is assigned based on projected extensions of stress (strain)-life curve.  Recently it has been shown that small amplitude cycles below the endurance limit cause surface and subsurface damages in aluminum and steel, respectively.  Furthermore, crack growth has also been shown to grow below the traditional (delta) Kth levels.  There is usually a discrepancy observed in analytical damage predictions and service findings of such cracks.  This is partly due to ignoring damage contributions from random frequency load cycles that appear in service load histories such as buffet, gust cycles, or vibratory and acoustic phenomenon. 

 

As the analytical life prediction capabilities and laboratory testing have improved significantly over the last two decades, it is important to assess and accurately quantify damage for both high frequency and small amplitude loads in service spectrum for better predicting service cracking and remaining life.  Recent advances in very high frequency (Giga)cycle fatigue test capability, and NAVAIR efforts to develop testing capabilities for high frequency random loading may make it possible to develop analytical approaches for predicting fatigue life under very high frequency random loading that are based on representative test data.  Furthermore, the effect of surface conditions on fatigue and crack growth life predictions under these long spectrum load histories with the above content needs to be further investigated in detail.  Therefore, there is a need for an analytical method of predicting and modeling the fatigue lives of aluminum and steel used for airframe structural components under high frequency random vibratory loading.

 

PHASE I: Develop an innovative approach to quantify fatigue damage and crack growth in spectrum loads containing loads of high and low frequency and magnitude.  Demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach to show how a program including fatigue tests, model and algorithm development efforts will be implemented.

 

PHASE II: Provide practical implementation of the recommended approach developed under Phase I.  Evaluate the approach through verification and validation of the analytical model by performing a rigorous series of both laboratory and service tests.  This testing must encompass major aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys used in aircraft industry.

 

PHASE III: Transition the analytical methodology to platforms that would benefit from modeling of high cycle loaded fatigue.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The analytical methodology to calculate and predict remaining lives will apply to aluminum, steel and titanium alloys; all of which are used in the public and private sector.  This process will increase the safety of the aircrafts flown for commercial and military use.  Accurate predictions will also reduce material cost for manufacturing aircraft components.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Bathias, C.  (2000) "Gigacycle fatigue of high strength steels prediction and mechanisms,"  European Structural Integrity Society, Volume 26, pp. 163-171. Available at www.sciencedirect.com.

 

2.  Marines, I., Bin, X. & Bathias C. (2003)  "An understanding of very high cycle fatigue of metals," International Journal of Fatigue, Volume 25, Issues 9-11, September-November, pp. 1101-1107. Available at www.sciencedirect.com.

 

3.  Murakami, Y., Yokoyama, N.N. & Nagati, J., (2001) “Mechanism of fatigue failure in ultra long life regime”, Fatigue in the very high cycle regime, Stanzl-Tschegg S, Mayer H, Eds. Institute of Meteorology and Physics, Austria.

 

4.  Sadananda K. and Vasudevan A.K. (1997) “Short Crack Growth Behavior,” Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics:  27th Volume, ASTM STP1296, r.S. Piasik, J.C. Newman, and N.E. Dowling, Eds., American Society for Testing and Materials, 1997, pp. 301-316.

 

5.  Sakai, T., Sato, Y. & Nagano, Y. (2002)  Fatigue & Fracture of Engineering Materials & Structures, Vol.25, pp.765-773.

 

KEYWORDS: Fatigue Strength; Endurance Limit; Crack Propagation; Stress; Strain; High Cycle

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-114                              TITLE: Innovative Thermoelectric Cooling Augmentation for E-2D Liquid Cooling

System

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-231 - E-2D Advanced Hawkeye – ACAT I

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop innovative approaches utilizing thermoelectric cooling to augment the E-2D Liquid Cooling System (LCS).

 

DESCRIPTION: The E-2D utilizes a Polyalphaolefin (PAO) based LCS as the primary method for cooling certain equipment. The system operates at a 50 gallons per minute (gpm) flow rate capacity with an inlet temperature requirement of 120 degrees Fahrenheit for ground operations and 106 degrees Fahrenheit for in flight operations. The system meets all the system requirements but there is always the possibility of system growth over time.  Due to numerous air vehicle constraints, thermoelectric cooling is a good option for system augmentation.  Innovative concepts are sought to augment the E-2D liquid cooling system using thermoelectric cooling to create an additional 10-20 Fahrenheit degree temperature drop in the system upstream from the inlet. 

 

Thermoelectric cooling utilizes the well known Peltier Effect which relies on the principle of applying a voltage to a thermocouple made of dissimilar metals to induce a temperature difference across the junction.  This technology is used in commercial applications as well as military applications, i.e. submarines. Conventional methods of increasing Environmental Control System (ECS) capacity would require significant system redesign.  Incorporation of thermoelectric cooling can be accomplished with minimal modifications utilizing available aircraft electrical power.

 

PHASE I: Develop initial concept design for an efficient thermoelectric cooling system to augment a liquid cooling system.  Demonstrate technical feasibility of the system's ability to decrease the temperature of PAO.

 

PHASE II: Provide practical development of a production-scalable system and implement the recommended system developed under Phase I.  Evaluate and demonstrate the systems ability to augment the LCS through laboratory testing and it's ability to decrease the temperature of PAO.

 

PHASE III: Transition the approach to E2-D and additional platforms that could benefit from cooling augmentation.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Any commercial air vehicles with available electric power that use a liquid cooling system and needs additional cooling capabilities could possibly benefit.

 

REFERENCES:

1. The Heatsink Guide: Peltier Guide.  (2005). In "the Heatsink Guide.  Retrieved from http://www.heatsink-guide.com/peltier.htm

 

2. E2-D Advanced Hawkeye. (2009). In Northrop Grumman Product Website.  Retrieved from   http://www.as.northropgrumman.com/products/e2dhawkeye/index.html

 

3. Peltier Information.  (2009). In Peltier Device Information Directory.  Retrieved from http://www.peltier-info.com/

 

KEYWORDS: Thermoelectric cooling; Polyalphaolefin (PAO); Liquid Cooling System; Heat transfer; Peltier Effect;  Advanced Hawkeye

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-115                              TITLE: Magnetic Gears for Utility Actuation Gearbox Applications

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-299 H-60 Helicopter Program

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate an airworthy magnetic gear-based gearbox suitable for utility actuation winch applications.

 

DESCRIPTION: Modern rotary wing aircraft have a number of utility winching/reeling systems for cargo, rescue, and sensor deployment applications.  Degradation or failure of these systems through wear of gear teeth can cause serious mission, reliability, maintenance, and logistical impacts. Magnetic gears afford the opportunity to provide speed and torque multiplication similar to a traditional geared gearbox or transmission, but by using magnetic attraction between rotating members rather than actual physical contact as between gear teeth. It may be possible to greatly reduce, or potentially eliminate, lubrication requirements compared to existing traditional gearboxes. A magnetic gear-based gearbox for winch applications could increase reliability and mission availability by reducing or perhaps eliminating wear-related gearbox failures attributable to traditional tooth-to-tooth contact. 

 

The primary set of challenges is to develop and test a magnetic gear-based gearbox system for winch applications capable of meeting the weight, envelope, stiffness, hysteresis, and torque and speed-multiplication requirements associated with small utility actuation gearboxes.  Applications range from large winches with intense duty cycles and high loads such as used on the H-60 and H-53 helicopters, to smaller rescue hoist winches on various other naval helicopters. The compatibility of magnetic gear technology with providing reliable operation in a difficult thermal, vibration and potentially corrosive maritime aviation environment is believed to be a challenge as well.

 

PHASE I: Determine the feasibility of developing proposed concept for aircraft applications including volume, weight, and performance.

 

PHASE II: Develop, fabricate and demonstrate a prototype magnetic gear design for an applicable gearbox system. Define test objectives and evaluate through performance and qualification-type testing.

 

PHASE III: Transition the concept to H-60 helicopter and other applicable platforms that can utilize a magnetic gear-based winch gearbox system.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: A magnetic gear-based winch gearbox system would have direct application to winching/reeling systems on commercial aircraft such as search and rescue aircraft, Police/Security helicopters, logging operation aircraft, and off-shore oil rig aircraft operation. Other potential applications include industrial control and heavy equipment used in construction and mining operations.  Indirect application of the technology to other non-winch gearbox systems appears feasible, and could be even broader to perhaps encompass commercial aircraft utility systems of many types as well as aviation propulsion gear-based gearbox systems with demands for high-inherent reliability/minimal maintenance.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Atallah, K., Calverlay, S. D., & Howe, D., (2004 May). High-performance magnetic gears. Science Direct – Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, 272-276, Supplement 1, E1727-E1729.  doi:10.1016/j.jmmm.2003.12.520 

 

2.  Atallah, K., Wang, J., Mezani, S., & Howe, D. (2001, July). A novel high-performance magnetic gear. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 37(46), 2844-2846. http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/ieejias/126/10/126_1352/_article

 

3.  P.O.Rasmussen, P. O., Andersen, T. O., Joergensen, F. T., & Nielsen, O. (2005, May-June) Development of a high performance magnetic gear. IEEE Trans. on Industry Applications. 41(3), 764 – 770. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=1433001&tag=1

 

KEYWORDS: Magnetic Gear; Winch; Gearbox; Mine Sweeping; Utility Actuation; Rescue Hoists

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-116                              TITLE: Geospecific Displacement Maps for Real Time, Stereoscopic Training

Simulation

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Information Systems, Sensors, Human Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Joint Strike Fighter, ACAT I

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop an innovative automated process that unlocks the advantages of real time displacement maps (or other tessellation technology) combined with geospecific two and three dimensional source imagery for implementing high complexity terrain surface regions in virtual environments for real time training simulators.

 

DESCRIPTION: State-of-the-art graphics chips are increasing in performance and beginning to incorporate displacement mapping technology. A displacement map consisting of texture imagery plus a vertical displacement for every point in the image can be created from aerial/satellite mono and stereoscopic imagery. Such a displacement map of a terrain area could contain embedded geospecific surface features such as trees, forest canopies, bushes, undergrowth, man made structures, etc with high resolution in both visual as well as three dimensional representations. Displacement mapping, edge detection analyses, and other new tessellation technologies have the potential to allow rapid incorporation of geospecific regions in a virtual world for real time training simulation. COTS software already exists which can automatically determine three dimensional displacements from mono as well as stereoscopic imagery. Thus, the process has potential to automatically incorporate highly cluttered terrain surfaces - without hand modeling the unique geometry of each terrain surface object.

 

Performance issues include any impediments to a complete end-to-end solution, sensor simulation issues, patch insertion issues, occulted data hole issues, multiple source data issues, modeler time and skill issues, compatibility issues.

 

PHASE I: Conceptualize and design an innovative process for rapid incorporation of a geospecific area into a training simulator starting with source imagery/data. Identify technology development, risk, and performance issues related to training simulation. Demonstrate the feasibility of the concept.

 

PHASE II: Develop, construct and demonstrate the operation of a prototype including the process to make the virtual environment database as well as computing the simulation imagery of multiple new sensors at real time rates suitable for pilot training. Demonstrate compatibility with real time training simulation stereo visual systems.

 

PHASE III: Transition this new capability to both military and commercial training simulators.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Real time high performance simulation such as commercial aviation flight trainers would benefit from successful outcome of this topic. The visual image generation industry would also benefit. For example 3D virtual representation of stereo-microscopy images will allow analyses of microscopic surfaces by a virtual interactive fly-through of even microscopic imagery (a bacteria could appear as big as a house).

 

REFERENCES:

1. Ephanov A. & Coleman C. (2006). Virtual Texture: A Large Area Raster Resource for the GPU. Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation, and Education Conference (I/ITSEC). to order go to http://www.simsysinc.com/IITSEC/ABS2006/SIM2006.htm#_Toc152918112

 

2. Glandville R. (2004).  Texture Bombing. GPU Gems (Ch. 20). Addison-Wesley Reading, MA.

 

3. Hertzmann A., Jacobs C., Oliver N., Curless B. & Salesin D. (2001). Image Analogies. SIGGRAPH 2001 Proceedings, Los Angeles, CA. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/383259.383295

 

4. Tsai, F. & Lin, H. -C. (2007). Polygon-based texture mapping for cyber city 3D building models. International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 21 (9), (pp. 965-981)

 

5. Nayak, Shailesh. ISPRS TC IV: Geo-databases and Digital Mapping - Trends and Challenges. ISPRS VOL 10, (pp.18-20). http://www.isprs.org/publications/highlights/highlights0605/13HL0605Society.pdf

 

6. Wei, L. (2005). Tile-Based Texture Mapping, GPU Gems 2, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA.

 

7.  Bunnell, M. (2005). Adaptive Tessellation of Subdivision Surfaces with Displacement Mapping, GPU Gems 2,  Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA. http://http.developer.nvidia.com/GPUGems2/gpugems2_chapter07.html

 

8.  Ali, S., Jieping Ye,  Razdan, A. & Wonka, P. (2009). Compressed Facade Displacement Maps. Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE Transactions on, 15(2) (pp. 262-273).

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/freeabs_all.jsp?arnumber=4585376

 

KEYWORDS: virtual; software; simulation; imaging; visual; database

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-117                              TITLE: Glide Away Precision Sonobuoy

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Sensors, Electronics

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-264, Air ASW Sys; PMA-290, P-8A Multi-Mission Aircraft

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE:  Develop an innovative system concept for modification of the AN/SSQ-53 Sonobuoy to incorporate a guidance and glide capability for deployment from a high altitude (25,000 ft mean sea level (MSL) and higher) aircraft to precise water-entry locations of 25 nautical miles (nm) or more from the launch position. 

 

DESCRIPTION:  Innovative concepts are sought to enable aircraft to remain at high altitude while conducting Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) search, localization, tracking, and attack, as well as Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW).  Currently, only very limited capability exists to deploy sonobuoys to precise locations from the deploying aircraft.  These capabilities require the use of multiple sensors to achieve this task; descent from altitude resulting in reduced on-station time; and over-flight of the desired sonobuoy placement. It is envisioned that proposed solutions will be launched from high altitude and “glide” to a precise water entry position.  This would allow deployment of a complex sonobuoy pattern quickly and accurately without the need for the aircraft to descend or deviate from the search pattern flight path. Additionally, as opposed to low-flying or close-in, the prosecuting aircraft will be able to maintain a safe standoff distance and altitude from potential hostile threats.

 

Proposed concepts should be capable of launch from an “A” size sonobuoy chute, with or without the use of a sonobuoy launch container (SLC).  Minimum capability goal will be to glide 25 NM from a deployment altitude of 25,000 ft to a water-entry point with a maximum Circular Error Probability of 50 yards. Innovative system solutions to sonobuoy guidance are highly desired, but should include both Global Positioning System (GPS) available and GPS-Denied environments.  Sonobuoy guidance may be accomplished through an in-flight guidance system, pre-launch analysis and deployment software, or a combination thereof.  This effort will include the concept development and design of all hardware and software packaged in an AN/SSQ-53 sonobuoy.

 

The proposed concept should not degrade the capability of the AN/SSQ-53 acoustic sensor equipment: antenna, processing hardware, downlink/uplink hardware, GPS, high power battery, and corresponding receiver/hydrophone.  Modifications to the AN/SSQ-53 sonobuoy must maintain the mass properties in accordance with the SSQ-500 production sonobuoy specification (i.e., within maximum weight and the center of gravity (CG) for “A” size sonobuoy).  The sonobuoy must be capable of launch from the current P-3C aircraft and the P-8A aircraft’s rotary and single-shot launchers.  “A” size sonobuoy standards are as follows: dimensions of 4.875-inch diameter x 36-inch length and weight of 40 pounds or less. 

 

Multi-consortium teaming at the sensor, hardware, software, or integration levels is acceptable.

 

PHASE I:  Develop and demonstrate technical feasibility of the GAPS initial concept. Generate preliminary hardware design details.  Develop a plan for developing a prototype and for testing of the prototype.

 

PHASE II:  Develop and finalize component design.  Develop and fabricate prototype unit(s) for testing.  Define field test objectives and conduct limited prototype testing; including the launch of prototypes from current P-3C and/or surrogate aircraft to demonstrate “glide-away” prototype performance.

 

PHASE III:  Develop a production design of Phase II solution.  Conduct integrated engineering and operational testing of an air deployed system.  Demonstrate full operational functionality in Navy-supported test scenarios.  Transition to the Fleet supporting, for example: Anti-Surface Warfare (ASW), Meteorological and Oceanographic (METOC).

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  Technology developed in this SBIR could be leveraged to assist the U.S. Coast Guard or other law enforcement agencies in large-scale Search and Rescue (SAR) operations where low altitude deployment of SAR equipment is undesirable.  This type of system capability may be of interest to the undersea mapping, exploration, seismology, and weather communities and may be used for monitoring marine mammals or icebergs.  Government agencies such as the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Department of Commerce are continually trying to upgrade their measurement and data collection capability.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Urick, Robert J. Principles of Underwater Sound for Engineers, 3rd ed. Los Altos Hills, CA: Peninsula Publishing, 1983.

 

2. U.S. Navy, “Approved Navy Training System Plan for the Navy Consolidated Sonobuoys.” [Online] Available http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/weaps/docs/ntsp-Sonobuoy.pdf, September, 1998.

 

3. Ultra Electronics, Maritime Systems, “Sonobuoys.” [Online] Available http://www.ultra-uems.com/sonobuoys.html, July 14, 2009.

 

4. Ultra Electronics Ltd, “An Overview of ASW Sonobuoy Types and Trends.” [Online] Available http://www.ultra-scs.com/resources/whitepapers/asw.pdf, March 2003.

 

5. Baker, Gregory J. et al “GPS Equipped Sonobuoy.” [Online] Available http://www.novatel.com/Documents/Waypoint/Reports/sonobuoy.pdf, 2001.

 

KEYWORDS: Sonobuoy; Sensor; Guided; Undersea; Acoustics; Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW); Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW)

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-118                              TITLE: 28GHz-43GHz Nadir/Near-Nadir (~70-90 degrees wrt horizontal) Low

Probability of Intercept Radio Frequency Direction Finding/GeoLocation Capability

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Sensors, Electronics

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: EP-3E Joint Airborne SIGINT Architecture Mod. Common Config. Prgm-ACAT III

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a single-platform, 28GHz-43GHz (upper Ka Band) Nadir/Near-Nadir (~70-90 degrees wrt horizontal) Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) Radio Frequency (RF) Direction Finding (DF)//GeoLocation capability for airborne Signals Intelligence/Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance (SIGINT/ISR) platforms.

 

DESCRIPTION: Departure from traditional airborne “stand-off” SIGINT/ISR mission profiles requires full, lower hemispheric signal intercept and geo-localization including signals emanating very close to vertically below the aircraft, a capability not currently developed or available to tactical aircraft, either at the desired frequencies or against LPI targets.  Navy SIGINT/ISR aircraft require small, lightweight, and preferably conformal Radio Frequencies (RF) antennas which efficiently operate in the 28GHz – 43GHz range.  A single antenna installation which serves to detect emitters of interest over a wide field-of-view and enable the geo-localization of target emitters using Direction of Arrival (DOA) information provided by the antenna is preferred. Solutions involving traditional Electronic Surveillance Measures (ESM) DF GeoLocation techniques requiring the determination of the locus of multiple lines-of-bearing as the aircraft traverses along a path to provide sufficient bearing spread for an accurate DF impact/GeoLocation is not desired as this technique does not generally produce near-instantaneous geolocation of RF emitters.  Technical innovation will be required to design both an antenna and processor that can provide a near-instantaneous geolocation capability based on 3-D (azimuth/elevation, or a pointing vector) DOA information.  DOA accuracies of 1 to 3 degrees will be deemed sufficient for proof of concept.  DOA accuracy greater than 1-3 degrees is desired, but will be weighed against associated cost and complexity it may introduce to the proposal.  Alternatively, other RF geolocation techniques, such as time difference of arrival (TDOA), frequency difference of arrival (FDOA), or high speed, high accuracy DF may be explored, as applicable to LPI signals.

 

Additional processing design innovation is desired to provide a “software defined processing” capability (e.g.: vis-à-vis Field Programmable Gate Array) FPGA-based processing which can be reconfigured to detect and locate signals based on various signal parameters (i.e.: power, frequency, modulation, etc.), and enable alternative signal processing techniques by reloading the processor’s software program, as opposed to replacing subsystem “black boxes” or major sections of the system’s firmware. 

 

The following are principal antenna and processor attributes whose relative values will be used to select the most suitable proposals:  RF Range/Gain, Field-of-View, DF/GeoLocation accuracy, Processor Software Reconfigurability, External Form Factor, System Weight and Power Requirements.

 

PHASE I: Design and demonstrate technical feasibility of desired capability.  Define proof-of-concept design elements.  Provide preliminary design and analyses to include optimized flight profiles and altitudes.

 

PHASE II: Finalize Phase I design.  Develop proof-of-concept prototype (breadboard/brassboard) design.  Develop modeling simulations of proposed capability. Provide modeling results based on prototype parameters and optimized flight profiles.  Demonstrate ability to achieve desired capabilities in laboratory environment using simulators/stimulators, and/or virtual environments.

 

PHASE III: Develop prototype capable of being testing in airborne environment using aircraft power and aircraft data/control busses.  Demonstrate desired capabilities via field testing or testing in simulated or actual signal environments. Transition developed technology to interested Navy platforms and to interested commercial entities.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The Airborne Search and Rescue Services would benefit from a successful outcome of this SBIR topic.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Skolnik, M. (2008).  Radar Handbook, 3rd Edition.

 

2. Antenna Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition. By John Volakis

 

3.  RF and Digital Signal Processing for Software-Defined Radio: A Multi-Standard Multi-Mode Approach (Paperback) by Tony J. Rouphael

 

4. Owen, T. (2009).  Software Defined Radio Solutions for DF Signal Processing Systems. Spectrum Signal Processing (background/informational paper) http://www.spectrumsignal.com/publications/SDR_solutions_for_DF.pdf

 

5  Pace, P. E. (2004).  Detecting and Classifying Low Probability of Intercept Radar, Artech House, Inc. Boston

 

6.  Pace, P. E. (2000). Advanced Techniques for Digital Receivers, Artech House, Inc., Boston, MA.

 

KEYWORDS: Conformal Antenna; NADIR RF-DF/Geolocation; Airborne SIGINT; Software Defined Processor; Ka Band; Low Probability of Intercept

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-119                              TITLE: Miniature Portable Ultra-Cold Atom Source without Active Pumps

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA264-Air Anti-Submarine Warfare Systems

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a miniature ultra-cold atom source without active pumps.

 

DESCRIPTION: Atom interferometers currently form the basis for state of the art sensors, ranging from gyroscopes to gravity gradiometers. Sensors based on cold and ultra-cold atom sources have been proven to provide significant (orders of magnitude) improvement in sensitivity over currently fielded devices.  This effort seeks to enhance the performance of these devices by using quantum degenerate gases. Until now, ultrahigh vacuum systems have been maintained by active vacuum pumps. However, current efforts to miniaturize these sources have been limited by the physical size of these active pumps. 

 

The focus of this effort is to develop a miniature, portable, ultra-cold (Bose condensed or Fermi degenerated) atom source without active pumps although proposed solutions utilizing active pumps which could still meet the required size restrictions may be considered.  In order to achieve degeneracy, proposed systems must be able to maintain exceptional vacuum (~10-9 torr).  Adding to the challenge, precise control of the dispensing of the atom of choice (typically Rubidium or Cesium) usually necessitates the use of dispensers, rather than ampoules, which can contaminate the vacuum. Although leak-less vacuum cells are by now standard technology, the combination of requiring ultra-high vacuum and precise control on the atom source requires innovative solutions.  The cell (“sensor head”) should be no larger than 5cm by 5cm by 5cm.  Support electronics and laser systems should be incorporated into standard 19 inch rack-mountable units.

 

PHASE I: Develop a vacuum system concept that is capable of maintaining better than 10 -9 torr vacuum with an appropriate alkali dispenser.  Demonstrate proof-of-principle by the end of the Phase I base effort.

 

PHASE II: Construct a prototype ultra-high vacuum cell with an ultra-cold atom source, based on the design and lessons learned in Phase I.

 

PHASE III: Transition the final product to a host of applications that involve precise measurement of gravity gradients (for inertial navigation, tunnel detection, etc), rotation (also for inertial navigation) and magnetic gradients (for anti-submarine warfare).

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: In addition to potential commercial uses for the sensors as outlined above (inertial navigation), gravity gradiometers and magnetic gradiometers can be used for oil exploration.  Gravity gradiometers can help find open pockets inside a massive environment, such as pockets inside collapsed buildings or collapsed mines.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Gustavson, T.L., Bouyer, P., and Kasevich, M.A., "Precision Rotation Measurements with an Atom Interferometer Gyroscope."  APS Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997): 2046 - 2049.

 

2. Snadden, M.J., McGuirk, J.M., Bouyer, P., Haritos, K.G., and Kasevich, M.A., "Measurement of the Earth's Gravity Gradient with an Atom Interferometer-Based Gravity Gradiometer."  APS Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 (1998): 971-974.

 

3. McGuirk, J.M., Foster, G.T., Fixler, J.B., Snadden, M.J., and Kasevich, M.A., "Sensitive absolute-gravity gradiometry using atom interferometry."  APS Phys. Rev. A 65 033608 (2002): 14 pages.

 

4. Schoser, J., Batar, A., Low, R., Schweikhard, V., Grabowski, A., Ovchinnikov, Yu. B., and Pfau, T., "Intense source of cold Rb atoms from a pure two dimensional magneto-optical trap."  APS Phys. Rev. A 66 023410 (2002): 10 pages.

 

KEYWORDS: Ultracold Atom Source; Atom Interferometer; Passive Vacuum Pump; Inertial Navigation; Gyroscopes; Gravity Gradiometers

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-120                              TITLE: Inherent Electrical Conductivity in Qualified Aircraft Transparency Materials

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-265; F-18 Hornet, Super Hornet and Growler Program

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop an inherently conductive transparency based on currently qualified transparency structural materials.

 

DESCRIPTION: Aircraft transparency systems use one of several qualified materials as the transparent structural member.  These include glass, cast acrylic, stretched acrylic, or polycarbonate [1-3].  In addition, transparency systems often include a layer of conductive material on the polymer ply.  This conductive layer serves at least one of several possible functions including electrostatic dissipation, or electromagnetic interference shielding.  The conductivity is usually provided by a metal or metal oxide in an ultra thin film, so as not to diminish the high optical transparency.  This conductive layer, in turn, must be protected from environmental degradation by additional coatings, usually a thin polymer film or an additional ply of structural polymer.  This layered approach creates multiple interfaces at which delamination can occur due to environmental exposure in service.  These debonded areas act as optical scattering centers, degrading the optical transparency of the system.   Delaminated areas require costly repair or replacement of the aircraft transparency system.  Ultraviolet degradation and electrostatic discharge burn through are also issues with transparency coatings.

 

A qualified transparency structural material is desired that has the conductivity “built-in” so that the metal coatings, and their attendant protective coatings and interfaces, could be eliminated.  The optical properties of the system must be preserved.  There have been numerous attempts to incorporate conductive fillers, such as carbon nanotubes or intrinsically conductive polymers, into optically clear materials, but the optical properties are often degraded to a point that would be unacceptable in an aircraft transparency application [4-7].  Additionally, this work is typically demonstrated in thin films not representative of aircraft transparency applications.

 

PHASE I: Develop a material system concept with “built-in” electrical conductivity that provides optical and mechanical properties similar to currently qualified aircraft transparency materials.  Demonstrate the technical feasibility of the concept through fabrication and testing of a few sub-scale coupons.  The target sheet resistance would be less than 25 ohms/square while maintaining a transmissivity of greater than 80% and mechanical properties sufficient to qualify to the appropriate military material specification.

 

PHASE II: Further refine and demonstrate the validity of the Phase I approach through scale-up and testing of prototypes of size and scale commensurate with application in aircraft transparency systems.  Establish the performance parameters of the systems through systematic testing of prototypes.

 

PHASE III: Transition the approach to a qualified transparency vendor for use on military and commercial aircraft.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Inherently conductive transparency materials have potential to transition to the commercial aircraft market.  In addition, the development of clear conductive polymer materials has great potential in the area of optoelectronics.

 

REFERENCES:

1. MIL-PRF-8184F – Plastic Sheet, Acrylic, Modified,

http://www.everyspec.com/MIL-PRF/MIL-PRF+(000100+-+09999)/MIL-PRF-8184F_10582/

 

2. MIL-PRF-25690B – Plastic, Sheets And Formed Parts, Modified Acrylic Base, Monolithic, Crack Propagation Resistant, http://www.everyspec.com/MIL-PRF/MIL-PRF+(010000+-+29999)/MIL_PRF_25690b_2165/

 

3. AMS-P-83310 – Plastic Sheet, Polycarbonate, Transparent. http://www.sae.org/technical/standards/AMSP83310

 

4. Du, F., Scogna, R. C., Zhou, W., Brand, S., Fischer, J. E., & Winey, K. I. (2004), Nanotube Networks in Polymer Nanocomposites: Rheology and Electrical Conductivity, Macromolecules, 37, 9048-9055.  http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ma049164g

 

5. De, S., Lyons, P. E., Sorel, S., Doherty, E. M., King, P. J., Blau, W. J., Nirmalraj, P. N., Boland, J. J., Scardaci, V., Joimel, J., & Coleman, J. N. (2009). Transparent, Flexible, and Highly Conductive Thin Films Based on Polymer-Nanotube Composites, ACS Nano, 3 (3), 714–720. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn800858w

 

6. Hopkins, A. R.; & Reynolds, J. R. (2000), “Crystallization of Conducting Polymer Networks in Polymer Blends,” Macromolecules, 33, 5221-5226. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ma991347t?prevSearch=%255Btitle%253A%2BCrystallization%2Bof%2BConducting%2BPolymer%2BNetworks%2Bin%2BPolymer%2BBlends%255D&searchHistoryKey=

 

7. Ou, R., Gupta, S., Parker, C. A., & Gerhardt, R. A. (2006), Fabrication and Electrical Conductivity of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/Carbon Black (CB) Composites: Comparison between an Ordered Carbon Black Nanowire-Like Segregated Structure and a Randomly Dispersed Carbon Black Nanostructure, J. Phys. Chem. B, 110, 22365-22373.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17091976

 

KEYWORDS: Transparency; Inherent Conductivity; Optically Clear; Polymer Materials; Nanocomposite; EMI Shielding

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-121                              TITLE: Carbon Nanotube Coaxial Transmission Lines

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-231 E-2 / C-2 Program Office

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based coaxial transmission line technology for high-power ultra high frequency (UHF) airborne radar applications.

 

DESCRIPTION: High-volume production of CNT based macrostructures in the form of conductive fiber and sheets has matured to the point that it may be possible to replace conventional copper-based high-speed data cable and radio frequency (RF) transmission lines. Presently CNT sheets can provide the same shielding effectiveness as 2 copper braids. Traditional coaxial cables have the bulk of their weight in shielding. Weight reductions of 40-50% could be achieved through successful development and use of CNT for shielding and center conductor material.  In addition, CNT based transmission lines may produce less RF attenuation than comparable copper lines and more efficiently conduct away heat in high-power applications. 

 

The primary near term applications of interest is the development of CNT based RF coaxial transmission lines suitable for use in a multi-channel, high-power airborne UHF radar system. Coaxial transmission lines in this application are subjected to temperature extremes, very high electrical currents, mechanical stress and vibration.  The CNT based coaxial transmission lines would replace both rigid and flexible coaxial lines currently used.

 

PHASE I: Develop the proposed concept and demonstrate through detailed analysis and modeling whether proposed CNT based coaxial transmission lines can significantly out perform conventional copper based coaxial transmission lines in high-power UHF airborne radar applications.  Identify major technical challenges that if not addressed would limit the suitability of this technology and estimate which technical challenges pose the greatest technical and cost risk.

 

PHASE II: Develop a prototype CNT based coaxial cable whose electrical and mechanical characteristics are suitable for use in the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye APY-9 Airborne Early Warning Radar System.  Evaluate critical cable characteristics through extensive testing and correct deficiencies. Address manufacturing issues that may limit high-volume producibility and affordability.

 

PHASE III: Transition the technology to the Fleet through a collaboration with the weapon system prime contractor.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: A very wide range of potential private sector applications exist including high efficiency RF transmission lines, electrical power transmission lines, high-speed data bus lines.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Davis, Virginia A. et. Al. “True solutions of single-walled carbon nanotubes for assembly into macroscopic materials” Nature Nanotechnology 4, 830 – 834, 1 November 2009.

 

2.  Nie, Zhihong, “Properties and emerging applications of self-assembled structures made from inorganic nanoparticles”, Nature Nanotechnology 5, 15 – 25, 24 December 2009.

 

KEYWORDS: Carbon Nanotube; Coaxial Transmission Lines; Radar Systems; High-Power RF; UHF Radar; Electronic Scanned Arrays

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-122                              TITLE: Gear Hobbing Predictive Model

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Space Platforms

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Joint Strike Fighter - Propulsion

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a predictive model for analyzing forces, temperatures and residual stresses during hobbing of propulsion transmission gears for process and component improvement.

 

DESCRIPTION: Gear hobbing is a complex machining process involving fabrication of fatigue critical components with stringent dimensional and surface finish requirements. The hobbing or material removal process can induce stresses that are beneficial (compressive) or detrimental (tensile). Residual tensile stresses work to open up flaws after numerous load cycles are applied, which degrades the maximum life of the part.  It is desired to modify the manufacturing process to improve the residual stress state in the gears resulting in improved fatigue life while reducing cycle time and cost.

 

Develop a physics-based modeling capability to provide detailed analysis of the gear hobbing process including forces, temperatures and residual stresses. The model should be able to capture details of the cutting tool edge and chip formation (e.g., with finite element models) and also analyze the process over the entire part program level. Full three-dimensional representation of the cutting tool and work piece should be provided for both detailed and tool path level analyses.

 

PHASE I: Determine the feasibility of innovative approach for modeling gear hobbing operations. Provide correlation between predicted and measured forces for gear-specific work piece material.

 

PHASE II: Develop, demonstrate and validate prototype gear hobbing modeling capability with fully three-dimensional analysis of gear hobbing at the detailed tool-chip (finite element) level as well as the full tool path gear hobbing analysis.

 

PHASE III: Transition validated full gear hobbing modeling tool to acquisition program and integrate with existing engineering analysis tools.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Complex machining process involving fabrication of fatigue critical components with stringent dimensional and surface finish is a requirement in gear manufacturing for commercial producers. The innovative gear hobbing modeling tool developed in this program will have equal benefits to the private sector such as the automotive, trucking and heavy equipment companies that utilize gears and gearboxes in their designs. The benefits to the private sector would be lower failure rates/warranty costs and enhanced fuel savings via greater power densities (HP per gearbox pound).

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Gimpert, D. (1994, January-February). The Gear Hobbing Process. Gear Technology, 11 (1), 38-44.

 

2.  Maiuri, T. J. (2009, March-April). Hob Tool Life Technology Update. Gear Technology, 26(2), 50-59.

 

KEYWORDS: Modeling; Fatigue; Machining; Gear Hobbing; Residual Stress; Gear Life

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-123                              TITLE: Integrated Chip Optical CDMA for Transport Layer Security

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Sensors, Electronics

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Joint Strike Fighter ACAT I

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop an integrated chip for CDMA (code division multiple access) to implement multi-level security in a fiber optic avionics network

 

DESCRIPTION: Code division multiple access (CDMA) has long been used by the wireless telecom industry for secure broadcast and select network architectures, where only the intended user with the correct code will be able to decode the signal.  Optical CDMA has shown promise as an approach to address the need for multi-level security (MLS) in military optical avionics multi-core processor networks.  While optical implementation of CDMA has been demonstrated using custom arrayed waveguides and other passive elements, current state of the art technology using discrete individual photonic components are on the order of 1,000’s of cm3 and does not meet the form factor requirements for aircraft use.  In particular, use of discrete individual components does not achieve the form factor reduction that can be achieved even if the individual component size is reduced further because of the minimum volumes required for individual packaging. 

 

It is thought that a reduction in OCDMA package size could be achieved by integrating active and passive optical waveguide elements with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) on a single chip.  If achievable, this integration would eliminate the need for intermediate fiber to device interfaces and could possibly yield two orders of magnitude in size reduction.  Emerging silicon photonics technology has shown promise in this area.  Anticipated technology challenges associated with this research include integration of passive photonic filter, detector and CMOS electronics for Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) reduction; developing photonic chip filters at sufficient resolution to fit within existing Dense Wavelength Division Multiple-access (DWDM) channel wavelength constraints; achieving temperature insensitivity in the design; and, incorporating re-configurability in the OCDMA code.

 

PHASE I: Analyze the feasibility and develop a design concept for an integrated optical CDMA communication system that addresses multi-level security (MLS).  Feasibility should include performing design simulations and numerical analysis to develop a design approach for an integrated optical CDMA decoder, including as many of the following elements on the chip: passive optical elements, filters, photodetectors, and back-end amplifiers.  The design trade-offs should include consideration of device fabrication tolerances, filter stability, level of security that can be achieved, and process integration.  Specify the materials and processes that would be utilized to fabricate the decoder and demonstrate key fabrication capabilities.

 

PHASE II: Fabricate a prototype OCDMA module incorporating a photonic chip decoder with integrated passive and active photonic elements for demonstration and testing.  The prototype chip may use external electronics but the design must be compatible with future integration of standard CMOS circuitry using standard design rules.  The chip package should include all necessary optical and electrical interfaces for laboratory demonstration and testing.  Test the OCDMA module in a laboratory testbed.

 

PHASE III: Productize the OCDMA module with integration of the CMOS and back-end electronics such as transimpedance amplifiers and microwave switches into the OCDMA decoder chip.  Package the chip for system level testing and demonstration in a network testbed.  Perform environmental testing and qualification on the packaged device.  Transition the OCDMA module in Navy avionics and data networks for aircraft and other platforms.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This technology has potential applications in commercial data communications networks, such as in data centers and local area networks.

 

REFERENCES:

1. James K Chan, “Optical ODMA Video Transport/Switching System,” Proc. SPIE, Vol. 3531, 52-60, (1998).

 

2. Y.S. Tang, Y. Xu, and J. K. Chan, “Development and Prospective of SOI-Based Photonic Components for Optical CDMA Application,” Proc. SPIE, Vol. 3953, 1-8, (2000).

 

3. Y.S. Tang, H.C. Shi, J. Bartha, and J. Chan, “Advances in Developing SOI Based Optical CDMA Chips,” Proc. SPIE, Vol. 4293, 10-14, (2001).

 

4. K. Sayano, I. Nguyen, and J. K. Chan, “Demonstration of Multi-Channel Optical CDMA for Free Space Communications,” Proc. SPIE, Vol. 4272, p. 38, (2001).

 

5. S. Etemad et al., “Optical Encryption for WDM Networks,” OFC/NFOEC 2009.

 

KEYWORDS: Optical Networks; CDMA; Optical CDMA; Code Multiplexing; Multi-Level Security (MLS); Multi-Core Processors

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-124                              TITLE: Affordable, Reconfigurable Aerial Refueling Part-Task Trainer

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Information Systems, Human Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Program

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop innovative part-task trainer concepts that emulate the aerial refueling process.

 

DESCRIPTION: Traditional training systems can cost upwards of $40M and can train only one pilot or team at a time.  Time on these systems is therefore at a premium and often must be scheduled by personnel well in advance of anticipated need.  However, even when a trainer is available, the fidelity provided for training aerial refueling is often lacking 1) the proper visual stereo displays needed for the close proximity flight, 2) the larger field of view necessary for aerial refueling (larger than commonly affordable on full mission trainers), 3) a simulation of the buffeting experienced in close proximity flight, and  4) the ruggedness to withstand such continual shaking and buffeting as is experienced in the cockpit during aerial refueling exercises.  The result is a lack of opportunity to train for this critical flight maneuver, and potentially negative aerial refueling training in our full-mission trainers. 

 

This technology would support aviation training, with development of a part-task trainer that emulates only the aerial refueling process.  The trainer would not need to perform landing, take-off, weapons, or any other functions that are not directly impacted by aerial refueling.  Motion based cues however must exceed the current state of the art in flight simulation, by providing  to the trainee the turbulence and physical motions experienced during all phases of live aerial refueling.  Visuals for the single purpose of aerial refueling training, providing the precise detail and three dimensional imagery needed during the critical phases of the refueling process would be required.

 

A dedicated aerial refueling trainer would reduce the demand on full-mission trainers, by off-loading some of the training to smaller, less-expensive training venues.  Dedicated part-task trainers also enable engineers to tailor trainers to specific training requirements, at a lower cost than a full-mission trainer.  Recent advancements in the various enabling technologies (small foot-print stereo displays, synthetic environment content creation, motion needed only for specific tasks) may allow us to more fully exploit today's latest visual, motion, and aerodynamic modeling.  Only a fraction of the cockpit functionality and instrumentation is required (as compared to a traditional flight simulator) thus significantly reducing costs.

 

Initial efforts should identify the cues needed to model aerial refueling as closely as possible.  Special consideration should be directed toward whether or not the technology could be used to augment existing trainers (dome or collimated systems with full-motion) or only as a part-task trainer.

 

PHASE I: Develop and prove technical feasibility of an innovative reconfigurable trainer design that improves upon the aerial refueling training currently provided in the Navy's full-mission simulators.

 

PHASE II: Develop, integrate, demonstrate and evaluate a prototype that provides aerial refueling training for one type of aircraft.

 

PHASE III: Transition the developed technology into use for training and commercialize the system for appropriate aircraft types.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Technologies that enable compact, inexpensive training solutions for the military can be transitioned to the commercial sector aircraft training environment.  Both sectors require training alternatives to full-up institutional-based learning environments.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Dudfield, H.J., Macklin, C., Fearnley, R., Simpson, A., & Hall, P. (2001) Big is better? Human factors issues of large screen displays with military command teams. Proc. of People in Control: 2nd International Conference on Human Interfaces in Control Rooms, Cockpits and Command Centres. IEE Press, (pp. 304-309).

 

2. Moorabbin Flying Services: Visual Systems. (2007) Retrieved September 25, 2007 from http://www.mfs.com.au/MFS_VisualSystems.htm

 

3. Tan, D.S., Gergle, D., Scupelli, P.G., & Pausch, R.  (2003) With similar visual angles, larger displays improve performance on spatial tasks. Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference in Human Factors in computing systems.  (pp. 217-224).

 

4.  Strachan, I. (Ed.) (2001). Motion Cueing in the Real World and in Simulations – Principles and Practice. Jane’s Simulation and Training Systems.  http://jsts.janes.com/public/jsts/index.shtml

 

KEYWORDS: Training; Simulation; Aerial Refueling; Stereo Display; Fidelity; Motion-based

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-125                              TITLE: Nanoparticles for Mid-Infrared Heat Source

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-272 Tactical Aircraft Protection Systems

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and manufacture nanoparticle heat emitting sources to be used for countermeasures on aerial vehicles.

 

DESCRIPTION: The leading threat in terms of lethality and proliferation to assault and assault support rotary and tilt-rotor aircraft are MANPADS.  These tactically launched surface-to-air missiles (SAMS)  typically use infrared seekers for guidance.  They are a threat to low flying aircraft (manned or unmanned) that are moving troops or supplies such as the new Marine Corps unmanned rotary-wing support vehicle.  Due to the nature of their mission these aircraft generally use flares or pyrophoric material preemptively for aircraft self-protection when deemed in a high threat area.  Traditional Mag-Teflon flares burn brightly with lots of smoke, and are not very covert in the visible light spectrum; and, additionally, have a persistence that can ignite fires when expended in proximity to the ground.  Pyrophoric metal flares (PMF) are more covert and has less persistence, but is a one-for-one replacement for the limited traditional flares carried in the ALE-47 Countermeasures Dispensers.  Thus, increasing flare capacities will aid aircraft to survive in the battlefield environment and accomplish their mission.  Additionally, future countermeasure expendables must be capable of defeating future imaging threats that guide/home on both visual and infrared spectrums; and, to this end, this technology may lead to a more advanced capability. 

 

The Navy is investigating the potential to fabricate oxide-coated nanoparticles as a pyrophoric decoy material in the mid-infrared spectral band (4-5 microns).  Nanoparticles would have the benefit of uniform size distribution for dispersal and even oxidation, with the desired spectral radiance in the mid-infrared.   The desired solution would provide an aircraft with multiple events/greater capacity of an infrared emitting heat source capable of defeating either an imaging or infrared seeker. Current infrared flares are Hazard Class 1.4. Proposed material should be equal or less hazardous. The material should be non-corrosive to aircraft surfaces.  Color ration and intensity should be suitable for fixed-wing fighter aircraft and rotor-/tilt-rotor wing aircraft.

 

PHASE I: Prove feasibility for manufacturing nanoparticles that can be coated with oxides that provide a mid-infrared emission.

 

PHASE II: Demonstrate in a lab/manufacturing setting the ability to fabricate nanoparticle materials with the desired spectral response.

 

PHASE III: Design and fabricate an aircraft dispenser with the ability to eject nanoparticles in the appropriate dispersal patterns and irradiance and transition to an air platform such as a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Commercial Aircraft may have a requirement for a reliable and cost effective countermeasure against Man-Portable Air-Defense Systems (MANPADS).

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Barron, A. R. (2009, May) Oxide Nanoparticles. Connexions.  http://cnx.org/content/m22969/1.2/

 

2. G.S. Tompa, S. Sun, et al; "MOCVD Process Model for Deposition of Complex Oxide Ferroelectric Thin Films", Integrated Ferroelectrics, 2001, Volume 36(1-4), pages 135-152.   http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/809542613-32745586/content~db=all~content=a752389253

 

KEYWORDS: Nanoparticle; Infrared; Countermeasure; MANPADS; Dispenser; Pyrophoric

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-126                              TITLE: Detection and Discrimination of Large-Scale Subsurface Generated Ocean

Perturbations 

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Ground/Sea Vehicles, Electronics, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-264 Air Anti-Submarine Warfare Systems

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop innovative radar detection and discrimination techniques for large-scale ocean perturbations.

 

DESCRIPTION: The Navy has made important progress in mapping and understanding subsurface-induced perturbations to the ocean's surface, and the aerosols immediately above the surface, and the way in which those perturbations manifest themselves.   However, not all processes are understood.  A strong interest exists in understanding the nature of large scale perturbations, their source physics, the effects at, and above the surface, and optimal means of detecting and characterizing the perturbations. 

 

The focus of these innovative approaches will be on natural and man-made sources of large-scale subsurface influences, their manifestation at and above the surface, and optimal remote sensing and signal processing techniques.  Emphasis will be placed on physics-based descriptors of all three processes: (1) subsurface signal generation, (2) propagation of resultant signatures at and above the surface, and (3) signature detection, recognition, characterization, and discrimination from ambient background using novel sensors.

 

Unique and innovative approaches to this problem are desired.  The Navy envisions that new innovative signal processing approaches may evolve through this program.

 

PHASE I: Evaluate approaches for a physics-based modeling of various ambient and anthropogenic sources of large-scale subsurface perturbations, the energy transfer processes involved in propagation of those signatures to the surface and near-surface, and concepts for discrimination and characterization of those source signatures with respect to noise, clutter, and masking.

 

PHASE II: Fully develop the physics-based concept of an exploitable class of perturbations from source generation through surface and possible above-surface manifestations.  Proof of principle analysis is desired using existing experimental data or newly acquired data. Initial detection and discrimination techniques should be developed.

 

PHASE III: Transition the capability to exploit this signature into the Fleet utilizing existing maritime radar sensor systems.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Potential dual use applications include ocean environmental assessments, physical oceanography, biological and chemical oceanography, ocean modeling and prediction, tactical environmental support, and marine meteorology.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Sammarco, P., Mei, C. C. & Trulsen, K.  (1994)   Nonlinear resonance of free surface waves in a current over a sinusoidal bottom - a numerical study.   Journal of Fluid Mechanics 279, 377-405

 

2.  Hwung, Hwung-Hweng, Ray-Yeng Yang & Shugan, I. V. (2009). Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 626 pp 1-20 doi: 10.1017/S0022112008004758, Published online by Cambridge University Press 01 May 2009

 

3.  Cao, Y.(2007). Computations of Nonlinear Gravity Waves by a Desingularized Boundary Integral Method (Doctoral dissertation). Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

 

KEYWORDS: remote sensing; signal processing; hydrodynamics; natural ocean inhomogenities; ocean modeling and prediction; marine science; oceanography

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-127                              TITLE: Non-Chemical Means of Stripping Hard Chrome Plate

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-265 F-18 Hornet, Super Hornet & Growler Program

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop non-chemical stripping technologies and processes to remove chrome from F-18 landing gear without machining and/or damaging base materials.

 

DESCRIPTION: Hard chrome plate is used extensively to provide wear and corrosion resistant surfaces on landing gear and hydraulic actuators.  Current processes for reworking worn surfaces require the use of chemical baths to strip the chrome plating.  These baths can introduce hazardous waste to the environment through four different ways – airborne pollutants during operation, bath drag-out to rinse water as the parts are removed, bath dump after chemical activity is reduced and accidental spillage. While every precaution is taken to minimize environmental hazards and to recycle chemicals to reduce the waste stream, a non-chemical means of stripping hard chrome plate is highly desirable. 

 

Innovative, non-chemical approaches for stripping hard chrome plate are sought.  The proposed process should be cost-effective and without risk of damage to substrate materials, which are typically low alloy steels or even stainless steel. The process should be able to clean surfaces where the coating is unevenly worn or even spalled.  Chrome plated areas are usually adjacent to critical features, such as corner radii or bearing faces, which must not be damaged in the stripping process. Ideally, the process would also be suitable for stripping high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) coatings, which are increasingly being used as an alternative to hard chrome plate.  The process must be suitable to non-flat geometry, such as struts and inner diameter bores as small as 2” diameter.  No heat should be generated during the removal process and no material is to be removed from the substrate during the process.  Portability of the process is a plus and chrome removal rate should be short enough, not causing a burden to the fleet/depots.

 

PHASE I: Demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed process by stripping hard chrome plate from six flat sample coupons and six round coupons. The plating must be done in accordance with AMS-2460 and the surface must be characterized before plating and after stripping.  Sample characterizations and stripped coupons are to be sent to the Navy for evaluation. Perform a cost analysis comparing the proposed process to current chrome stripping methods.

 

PHASE II: Demonstrate the suitability of the process for stripping actual landing gear components. Explore the ability of the process to strip HVOF coatings. Build and demonstrate a prototype unit suitable for operation at a Navy repair and overhaul facility.

 

PHASE III: Fully develop the chrome stripping processes/units and transition for Navy or other government use.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Successful development of this technology could be transitioned to commercial airlines for the removal of chrome.

 

REFERENCES:

1. McClay, W. J., & Reinhard, F. P. (2007). Waste Minimization and Recovery Technologies” Metal Finishing, 105 (10), 715-742.

 

2. Legg, K. (2008). Proceedings from ASETS Workshop: “Surface Finishing and Repair Issues For Sustaining New Military Aircraft”. Tempe, AZ.

 

3.  AMS 2460 - Plating, Chromium

 

KEYWORDS: Chrome; Chrome Removal; Landing Gear; Plate; Stripping; Coating

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-128                              TITLE: Predictions of the Acoustic Nearfield on a Carrier Deck

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Information Systems, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Joint Strike Fighter Program

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a practical approach to defining the noise radiating properties of a supersonic jet so that it may be used as an equivalent source in commercial Boundary Element Analysis (BEA); Finite Element Analysis (FEA); or Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) noise prediction models.

 

DESCRIPTION: Modern propulsive supersonic jets produce a high amplitude noise field with complicated characteristics. The apparent noise source as measured and mapped using acoustic holography methods occurs from 1 to 100 nozzle diameters behind the engine due to a variety of turbulent behaviors of the hot jet. This complicated aeroacoustic problem is not easily modeled using classical analytical approaches. The key difficulty addressed in this work is characterizing the source. Turbulent, hot supersonic jets have been shown to radiate noise with “beaming” in certain directions. This is different than a “simple source” which typically radiates with spherical spreading. In a supersonic jet, turbulent eddies with some favored dimensions are translating at high speed along the jet boundary, in the shear layer, and produce frequency and direction dependent noise. It is desired to develop procedures to characterize or approximate this noise source in a way that would allow use of commercially available noise modeling methods (such as BEA, SEA or similar).

 

The candidate approach should be capable of working from government provided reference measurements of the sound “nearfield” close in around a supersonic jet, and produce a source, or forcing definition compatible with a commercial noise modeling code. The noise code, using the provided source definition must then predict the frequency and angle dependent noise field out to all practical distances. Methodologies should demonstrate the ability to account for superposition of the jet noise fields from multiple jets during simulated high activity carrier launch and retrieval operations, as well as the noise reflecting characteristics of the aircraft, jet blast deflectors and other carrier deck features. The developed approach will be evaluated by applying the method to a sample of measured nearfield jet noise data and give a reasonably accurate blind prediction of the noise as measured anywhere in the region.

 

Of primary interest is the accuracy of the methodologies compared to measurements to predict noise at particular crew locations in the noise field. Of secondary interest is the practicality of simulations in terms of turn-around time, complexity of needed data and computer resources required for the simulations.

 

PHASE I: Develop, demonstrate and prove feasibility of a procedure to process measured nearfield noise data from a supersonic jet in order to create source inputs to commercially available nose modeling methods that will be capable of predicting both near and far field noise.

 

PHASE II: Extend the method developed under Phase I to include the effects of typical features of an aircraft carrier deck, such as a Jet Blast Deflector (JBD) and superposition of multiple jet streams. Develop a prototype procedure/methodology and demonstrate the accuracy and practicality of the prototype.

 

PHASE III: Finalize into a practical procedure and transition methodology to US Navy and potential commercial customers.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Extension of one or more commercially available noise prediction tool to model supersonic flow as a source may allow such tools to be applied in a variety of other situations. Supersonic business jets are being contemplated by some manufacturers. Further, such methods may allow community noise predictions due to aircraft operations that would be generally useful.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Ikelheimer, B. J. (2005). Advanced simulation noise model for modern fighter Aircraft. Proceedings of Noise-Con 05, Minneapolis, MN

 

2. Gee, K. L. (2005). Prediction of nonlinear jet noise propagation (Doctoral thesis). The Pennsylvania State University.

 

3. Simonich, J.C., Schlinker, R.H., (2008) Measurement of Source-Wave Packets in High Speed Jets and Connection to Far Field, AIAA 2008-2891.

 

4. Reba, R., et al, (2005). Modeling Jet Noise from Organized Structures Using Near Field Hydrodynamic Pressure, AIAA 2005-3093.

 

KEYWORDS: aeroacoustics; jet noise modeling; noise prediction; supersonic jet noise; boundary element analysis; statistical energy analysis

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-129                              TITLE: Advanced Solid State Memory Conversion with Advance On-board Test

Capability

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Sensors, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-265 F/A-18 Super Hornet, Hornet, and Growler Program

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop an innovative solid-state memory storage unit that allows for rapid insertion of advancing commercial memory densities while maintaining shell backwards compatibility for existing sensor systems, and providing advanced embedded capabilities for interface personalization and in-situ sensor system testing.

 

DESCRIPTION: The Government spends significant resources on mass data storage devices.  Development of these systems is expensive as is the upgrade, and with the continuous need for memory devices to stay on pace with advancing sensor technology, upgrades are frequently desired, but infrequently delivered. The Navy supports multiple varieties of storage devices that are designed for specific sensor systems, interfaces, and standards, adding to the cost and complexity of providing up to date mass data storage devices.

 

This initiative seeks develop an innovative low-cost solid state storage unit that is easily upgradeable and cross-platform compatible.  The developed technology should implement a memory subsystem that accepts drop-in pluggable solid state drives for memory density upgrades, for easy and inexpensive replacement (plug-in) comparable to that of commercial/industrial market upgrades for their memory products.

 

Unlike existing systems, the proposed design would implement a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) controlled solid state core resulting in increased control and configurability over in-field models. The hardware should be configurable ‘on-the-fly’ for use with various interfaces and standards (e.g., STANAG-4575, GigE, RS-422, etc.) specific to the diverse tactical sensor systems. This cross-platform capability would reduce ‘per sensor’ development and would be a low cost, innovative solution for increasing device availability for users with high priority needs.

 

In addition to expandable memory and cross platform capability the device would implement in-system capabilities for sensor and cable testing to reduce system maintenance costs.  This innovative approach would increase system level capability while reducing overall cost.

 

The proposed mass memory device would meet the form and fit requirements of the various sensor systems. A goal is to re-use the solid state storage assemblies (shells) for a form, fit, function solution  If this proves to be impossible, the hardware would be designed so that it could be interchangeably packaged into a variety of custom-designed system-compatible enclosures.  Size, weight, and power (SWAP) would meet or exceed current performance parameters with a desired weight reduction on the order of 25-50% and alternative power/data sources for ground access (USB 2.0 or later, power-over-Ethernet, A/C, etc.). The system would sustain write speeds in excess of 500 Mbytes/sec, and total storage capacities in excess of 1 TB (terabyte).

 

PHASE I: Develop a proof-of-concept for the proposed approach to incorporate FPGA-controlled high density solid state storage with drop-in pluggable memories which meet the described requirements. Provide an analysis of technology driven storage capacity improvements and how those improvements will be incorporated into the existing storage device.

 

PHASE II: Develop a prototype of the solid state core assembly based on Phase I functional design.  Develop enclosure systems (pre-existing shells or custom designs) for the interchangeable sensor-configurable hardware. Provide detailed analysis of the solid state memory performance in a laboratory as well as a dynamic aircraft environment. Provide by analysis, assembly reliability and anticipated improvements. Demonstrate sustained, stable operation of the power source in excess of 2 hours.

 

PHASE III: Develop a solid state storage assembly core design package for integration into tactical systems such as the Advanced Tactical Air Reconnaissance System (ATARS) or SHAred Reconnaissance Pod (SHARP). Conduct flight testing of the solid state storage assembly on a Navy aircraft to show that the assembly meets all performance requirements.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The ability to increase storage capacity within a given SWAP environment can be utilized by a number of commercial environments including ship and space system. Application for bulk data collections and storage by DEA (drug enforcement administration), law enforcement, and the Department of Homeland Security will facilitate the quantity and fidelity of the data available to share in a real time and near real time situation.

 

REFERENCES:

1. STANAG-4575 NSA/0486(2009)-JAIS/4575 08 May 2009 – "NATO Advanced Data Storage Interface (NADSI)"

 

2. Serial ATA Revision 2.6 Specification (Feb 07), “Serial ATA Specification Rev 2.6 Gold”

 

KEYWORDS: Solid State Disk; Solid State Memory; High Density storage; Core Memory; In-Situ-Sensor Testing; Sensor Interfaces

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-130                              TITLE: Multi-Polarization Inverse Synthetic-Aperture Radar (ISAR) for Automated Ship

and Small Craft Classification

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Ground/Sea Vehicles, Sensors, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-299 H-60 Helicopter Program

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop innovative, multiple polarization techniques that will both increase the information content in Inverse Synthetic-Aperture Radar (ISAR) images as well as exploit that information to increase the robustness of maritime classification tools that assist sensor operators in rapidly and accurately classifying ships and small boats in the littoral.

 

DESCRIPTION: The state of the art in ISAR assisted target recognition uses single polarization image frames.  The coherent nature of both SAR and ISAR processing can make it subject to a considerable amount of speckle (or glint of unresolved scatterers) as well as “holes” in the image where the scattering mechanism provides a cross-polarized response to the antenna.  Speckle reduction improves the visual quality of SAR and ISAR imagery, and it permits the application of more sophisticated image processing and/or improves the robustness of current feature extraction algorithms.

 

Multiple polarimetric processing techniques have been developed for SAR processing that reduces these problems significantly.  If applied to ISAR, these techniques have the potential to significantly improve the quality of the feature extraction and thus classification performance.  In addition, different polarization responses are indications of features.  For example, if dual circular polarization responses are sampled on receive, resolved scatterers will be separated by channel into even and odd bounce scatterers.  This property has the potential to clearly identify the two-bounce scattering at the intersection of the deck and the superstructure from the flat plates of the hull and the superstructure.

 

PHASE I: Develop and perform a detailed concept and analysis assessing the value of multi-polarization ISAR processing for aiding ship and small craft classification.  Determine feasibility of the concept and develop a test plan that addresses performance metrics for use during Phase II testing.

 

PHASE II: Design and demonstrate that the prototype of the proposed approach can improve ISAR classification aids in the presence of imperfect data.   The demonstration and refinement should be undertaken using either available or DoD provided data sets.

 

PHASE III: Collaborate with radar system manufacturers to transition the technology to the Fleet.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The general methods developed could be applicable to a wide range of feature classification needs ranging from those of homeland security to the medical field.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Kawakami, K., Tanaka, H.  & Yamamoto, K. (2004). 3D Object Recognition using ISAR Image. SICE Annual Conference in Sapporo. Japan. pp. 204-207. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org xpl/freeabs_all.jsp?arnumber=1491396

 

2. Withagen, P. J., Schutte, K., Vossepoel, A. & Breuers, M. (1999). Automatic classification of ships from infrared (FLIR) images Signal Processing, Sensor Fusion, and Target Recognition VIII, SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3270, Orlando, USA, pp. 180-187.

 

KEYWORDS: Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar; Polarization; Automatic Target Recognition; Ship and Small Craft Classification; Littoral Operations; Radar

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-131                              TITLE: Increased Target Selectivity Harpoon Seeker

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-201, Precision Strike Weapons, ACAT II

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a low-cost approach that will significantly improve a sequential search radar seekers probability of acquiring the intended target in a target-rich environment.

 

DESCRIPTION: The current Harpoon weapon uses a radar seeker that sequentially searches an Area of Uncertainty (AOU). This method starts by searching for targets within an assigned search area (in both azimuth and elevation) and when it gets a return it determines if the return is clutter or a target. If the return is determined to be a target, the seeker will start tracking the return/target.

 

The current Harpoon guidance control unit (GCU) has sufficient processing power to implement a basic target mapping capability, but does not have sufficient data and control using the current seeker interface. Implementation of the appropriate algorithms in the GCU with only minor modifications to the seeker and/or its interface as well as improved target selectivity is desired.

 

Several engineering studies have been performed over the last 25 years along with hardware demonstrations showing the benefits of using track-while-scan (TWS) algorithms to improve target selection accuracy in a target-rich environment. These demonstrations have assumed that these algorithms would be performed within the seeker where the target detection information is most readily accessible. While most would agree with this logic, its implementation would require a major modification to a large portion of the Harpoon seeker inventory. The cost of such a major seeker upgrade has proven to be cost-prohibitive. While the newer service life extension program (SLEP) seeker was designed with this requirement in mind, it represents only a small portion of the overall seeker population. An alternative that could increase target selection capability without major modifications to the radar seeker is desired.

 

The above studies showed there is a benefit of using a TWS seeker in a target-rich environment to improve target selectivity, not how to implement them outside the radar seeker. This SBIR effort will address the implementation of the necessary algorithms outside the radar seeker. The overall conclusion from these studies, that TWS seekers provide increased target selectivity, should be used as an assumption for this SBIR. Given this assumption, this effort will develop new TWS algorithms that run outside the radar seeker with less data available while maintaining current system performance. This approach is required in order to provide a cost effective way to increase the Harpoon weapon systems target selectivity.  

 

This effort will determine the impact of going from a sequential search radar seeker to a TWS radar seeker that would increase target selectivity. The sequential radar seeker, described above, relies on certain features to meet performance requirements (e.g. probability of false alarm, search times, and dwell times). Representative unclassified performance figures will be provided to support Phase I of this SBIR. The TWS system would start searching for targets and when it gets a return, it would determine if it is a target or clutter. If it is determined to be a target, a track file would be generated and the seeker would continue searching for other targets.

 

PHASE I: Determine and demonstrate the feasibility of developing a low-cost approach to increasing the target selection capability of a sequential search seeker in a target-rich environment.

 

PHASE II: Develop a prototype and demonstrate the improved target selection capability of the technology on actual hardware of the contractors choosing.

 

PHASE III: Transition the increased target selectivity seeker upgrade to the Harpoon platform.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The algorithms developed would be applicable to non-military radar systems such as those used by the FAA and U.S. Coast Guard. There is also a potential to use these algorithms in a collision avoidance system for automobiles.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Gonzalez, Rafael C. & Woods, Richard E. (1992). Digital Image Processing. Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley.

 

2. Theodoridis, S. & Koutroumbas, K.(2009). Pattern Recognition. Burlington: Academic Press

 

3. Skolnik, M. (2008). Radar Handbook, 3rd Edition.

 

4. Skolnik, M. (2002). Introduction to Radar Systems. McGraw-Hill.

 

5. Stimson, G. (2000). Introduction to Airborne Radar 2nd Edition

 

KEYWORDS: Harpoon Weapon System; Guidance Control Unit; Target Selectivity; Track While Scan Algorithm; RF Seeker; Surface Warfare

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-132                              TITLE: Heat Resistant Visual Landing Aid (VLA) Lighting Fixtures for Ship Flight

Decks and Expeditionary Air Field (EAF) Matting

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-251 Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop an innovative in-deck lighting fixture design that can withstand the increased heat loads expected from future aircraft.

 

DESCRIPTION: Visual Landing Aids (VLAs) on air capable ships, aircraft carrier flight decks and Expeditionary Airfield matting are required for night and/or low visibility aircraft operations for general lighting, navigation, flight deck, and special purposes.  Future aircraft are expected to have hotter exhaust that could threaten the integrity of these lighting fixtures while recovering or taxiing.  The Navy seeks an in-deck/Airfield Flush-Deck lighting fixture that can be subjected to aircraft exhaust nozzle indirect temperatures in the range of 600-700F for long dwell periods as well as near-direct temperatures in the range of 1500-1700F for relatively short durations.  Current lighting fixtures have external surface materials such as 4130 steel, aluminum alloy, stainless steel, silicone rubber, a night vision device compatible lighting filter and a glass lens coated with Magnesium Fluoride. 

 

The solution proposed will need to be conformal to the skin of the existing ships’ structure and Expeditionary Air Field (EAF) AM2 matting, with a fixture design that is form, fit, function compatible with existing shipboard/airfield lighting configurations and be able to accept source light through fiber optic bundles, night vision device compatible lighting filter, LED, and incandescent lighting sources.  The carrier environment is extremely challenging.  Existing fixtures are capable of withstanding direct impact of aircraft tailhook and/or the tailhook "dragged" across the fixture during arrestment or bolter.  The fixture should experience no more than aesthetic damage and should be fully functional after impact.  Accumulated damage over time would be permissible but not be so severe as to cause a service issue.  The fixture should be usable for a minimum of a 6-month deployment without parts replacement other than normal maintenance actions.

 

PHASE I: Provide a conceptual design and identify key technical issues. Prove the technical feasibility of the concept through by addressing those issues through analysis and/or limited lab demonstrations.  Provide top level cost and reliability estimates.

 

PHASE II: Develop a prototype based on the design concept from Phase I. Provide a detailed test plan, finalize and conduct a scaled capabilities demonstration of the prototype.  Address the potential for shipboard/EAF replacement as well as the ability to meet shipboard/EAF environmental requirements. Hone cost and reliability estimates.

 

PHASE III: Design and fabricate full-scale fixture(s).  Provisions will be made to facilitate shipboard lighting testing of light fixtures and/or the EAF AM2 matting surface.  Subsequent to system refinement and all first articles testing, selected components will be lab tested and shipboard/field demonstrated.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This technology could benefit a wide range of applications where ruggedized heat resistant lighting applications are required.  FAA (runways), Off Shore platforms, and industrial plants require similar lighting sources.  Innovative applications would transfer to many other commercial applications.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Davis, J.R. (1997). ASM Specialty Handbook: Heat Resistant Materials, ASM International

 

2.  Information on flight deck and EAF lighting will be posted on the SITIS website on or about 21 April 2010.  www.dodsbir.net

 

KEYWORDS: Heat Resistant; Lighting Systems; Illumination; Visual Landing Aids; Ship Lighting; Airfield Lighting; LED

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-133                              TITLE: Aeroacoustics of High-Speed Jet Impingement

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Joint Strike Fighter

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop an innovative predictive modeling and simulation tool for the complex phenomena associated with the flow-acoustic resonances arising from jet impingement primarily from short and vertical-take-off (STOVL) tactical aircraft.

 

DESCRIPTION: In short- and vertical-take off configurations of STOVL tactical aircraft the propulsive nozzles are rotated toward the ground to generate the necessary lift. When that happens, the high-speed hot jet from the engine exhaust, as well as cooler jets from the roll-post nozzles on the wings (and possibly from the lift-fan as in the JSF F-35), impinge on the ground plane. These jets are then deflected by the ground and this process creates complex aerodynamic and aeroacoustic interactions (of the jets with themselves as well as with the ground). These interactions depend primarily on the airframe and nozzle geometries as well as the engine operating conditions.  Flow-acoustic resonances arise causing significant unsteady structural loading on the airframe surfaces.  In addition, the detrimental effect of noise on maintenance and support launch personnel is a health issue. It is also a safety issue because STOVL operations noise significantly reduces the ability of the pilot and support personnel to communicate effectively jeopardizing safety.  A similar, but less complex situation, occurs in the Navy-unique application of carrier take offs in front of the Jet Blast Deflector (JBD). Predictive simulations of these complex coupled impinging jet flow phenomena are only possible by a systematic development of large eddy simulation (LES) capabilities or other high-order multi-scale numerical simulation techniques.  By having a complete understanding of the flow-generated noise and its effect on personnel, air vehicle performance, and structural integrity, improvements to the design and carrier logistics can be realized.  Innovative modeling and simulation tools are sought that can capture these phenomena and provide key solutions to STOVL tactical aircraft engineers.

 

PHASE I: Determine the feasibility of accurately modeling the aeroacoustics of high-speed jet impingement, taking into account all of the aerodynamics and physical boundaries necessary to capture said phenomena.  Show preliminary approach to impacting the design and carrier deck logistics.

 

PHASE II: Develop prototype model and simulation (M&S) software reproducing scale model results.  The M&S tool should provide accurate comparison to key metrics measured from test.

 

PHASE III: Integrate software into the design practice and mission logistics of VSTOL aircraft operation on carriers.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: JBDs are used in commercial airports to reduce the ground-level sound and propagation of jet noise.  The structural fatigue and noise associated with this practice would benefit from a better understanding of the aeroacoustics.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Krothapalli, A., Rajkuperan, E., Alvi, F. & Lourenco, L., "Flow field noise characteristics of a supersonic impinging jet," J. Fluid Mechanics, 315, 1999, 155-181.

 

2. Henderson, B., Bridges, J. & Wernet, M., "An experimental study of the oscillatory flow structure of tone-producing supersonic impinging jets," J. Fluid Mechanics, 542, 2005, 115-137.

 

3. Henderson, B., "The connection between sound production and jet structure of the supersonic impinging jet," J. Acoustical Society America, 111, 2002, 735-747.

4. Alvi, F.S., Ladd, J. A. & Bower, W.W., "Experimental and computational investigation of supersonic impinging jets," J. AIAA, 40, 2002, 599-609.

 

KEYWORDS: Jet Impingement; Large Eddy Simulation; Jet Blast Deflector; Jet Noise; Aeroacoustics; Exhaust Plume

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-134                              TITLE: Low-Cost Compact Magnetometers for Air and In-Water Anti Submarine

                                                Warfare (ASW)

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-290 P-8A High Altitude ASW

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a small, low-cost, low-power, low-weight total field magnetometer for use on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), buoys, in-water arrays, unmanned ground vehicles, and manned platforms.

 

DESCRIPTION: Current magnetometer systems are too large to be integrated into a small UAV and too expensive to be used in expendable platforms.  The current ASQ-233 Magnetic Anomaly Detector (MAD) sensor is approximately 60” long by 7” diameter, weighs about 29 lbs, and cost in excess of $350,000 each.  Commercial magnetometers, though smaller in size, are still over $30,000 unit cost.

 

Low-cost, light-weight, low-power, expendable magnetometers are desired for shallow water ASW, geomagnetic noise reduction, in-water detection, and land-based target detection such as buried weapons caches and improvised explosive devices (IEDs).  Proposals should provide innovative design concepts for a scalar magnetometer able to operate in all field directions and magnitudes.  Three-axis vector magnetometer devices are not desired for this effort.

 

Size, weight, and power goals are driven by intended small platform applications.  The cost objective should be less than $5,000 in small quantities with a goal of less than $2,000 in volume production (100 - 500 units/year).  Proposed designs should be small (< 100 cm3 sensor head, < 1500 cm3 remote electronics module), low-power (< 10 W total), and low-weight (< 5 lb. total).  The noise floor objective of the compact magnetometer should be in the range 1 to 10 pT/rt Hz from 0.01 to 100 Hz with a goal of 2 pT/rt Hz from 0.01 to 20 Hz and a heading error of < 300 pT.   

 

Currently available magnetometers vary substantially in the above parameters; however, they all fall far short of the cost specification.

 

PHASE I: Develop innovative design concepts for a low cost compact magnetometer that can achieve the described cost, weight, size, power, and performance requirements.  Evaluate its applicability to the above stated utilizations.  Establish the feasibility of designing and fabricating the compact magnetometer prototype in Phase II.

 

PHASE II: Fabricate two compact magnetometer laboratory prototypes based on the Phase I design.  Demonstrate the specified noise floor in a laboratory and field environment with the above-specified parameters.

 

PHASE III: Transition the compact magnetometer for use in NAVAIR platforms.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Miniature high-performance magnetometers will find application in UAVs for geologic applications including mineral and petroleum exploration.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Happer, W., "Optical Pumping."  Reviews of Modern Physics 44 (1972): 169 - 249.

 

2. Kominis, I.K., Kornak, T.W., Allred, J.C., and Romalis, M.V., "A Sub-femptotesia Multichannel Atomic Magnetometer."  Nature 422 (2003): 596 - 598.

 

3. Shah, V., Knappe, S., Schwindt, P.D.D., and Kitching, J., "Subpicotesla Atomic Magnetometry with a Micro-Fabricated Vapor Cell."  Nature Photonics 1 (2007): 649 - 652.

 

4. Smullin, S.J., Savukov, I., Vasilakis, G., Ghosh, R.K., and Romalis, M.V., "A Low-Noise High-Density Alkali Metal Scalar Magnetometer."  arXiv:physics/0611085, 24 Jul. 2009.  Web.  11 Nov. 2009.

 

KEYWORDS: Magnetometers; Magnetic Anomaly Detection; Anti-Submarine Warfare; Unmanned Air Vehicles; Vertical Takeoff UAVs; Improvised Explosive Devices

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-135                              TITLE: Rain Repellency for Shipboard Aircraft Transparency

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Joint Strike Fighter, ACAT I

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop innovative rain repellency coating concepts for aircraft stretched acrylic canopies to improve visibility in inclement weather.

 

DESCRIPTION: Navy aircraft often have to taxi, take-off, and land during conditions of differing amounts of rain. While performing taxi and take-off operations the pilot must be able to clearly see ground crew directions. During landing, the pilot must be able to clearly see landing strip lights, and for carrier landings, the Optical Landing System (OLS). The Joint Strike Fighter canopy and windscreen are manufactured  from stretched acrylic in accordance with MIL-P-25690 and has a polyurethane-type top coat.

 

Development of innovative concepts for permanent coatings to improve rain shedding properties for ground and low speed operations are desired. Rain repellent evaluations of Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) hydrophobic treatments, used in automotive and non-aviation marine applications, showed little to no margin of improvement over the baseline coating system. These evaluations were conducted at room temperature in laboratory conditions using a roll-angle test.  Proposed coating concepts must be compatible with the polyurethane-type top coat, mission environments (i.e. supersonic speeds, and extreme temps) and should last the life of the aircraft transparency without degradation. Chronically applied coatings or treatments that would perform the same task will also be considered. Treatment solutions must be able to meet requirements specified in “Rain Repellency Coating Requirements”, listed below. These requirements include, but are not limited to: rain erosion, marine operating environment, salt fog, salt spray and commonly encountered chemicals. Coatings and treatments may not hinder the optical properties in any way, including haze, optical distortion, and light transmissivity.

 

PHASE I: Determine feasibility of developing a permanent or chronically applied rain repellency coating to perform in a marine environment on stretched acrylic transparencies with polyurethane-type top coats.

 

PHASE II: Demonstrate the validity of the Phase I approach through fabrication and testing of sub-scale coupons. Coated coupons should be tested against bare stretched acrylic, and polyurethane-type coated acrylic. Coupons should be tested by measuring the roll angle before and after rain erosion testing, as well as before and after being subjected to salt spray.

 

PHASE III: Transition the approach to a qualified transparency vendor for use on military and commercial aircraft.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Successfully developed technologies have potential to transition to the commercial aircraft market.  In addition, the automotive aftermarket may also be interested in this type of coating.

 

REFERENCES:

1. MIL-PRF-25690B – PLASTIC, SHEETS AND FORMED PARTS, MODIFIED ACRYLIC BASE, MONOLITHIC, CRACK PROPAGATION RESISTANT

 

2. "Rain Repellency Coating Requirements", Document Number 435-001-2010.2, 23 Sept 2009, posted in SBIR Interactive Topic Information System (SITIS) on 04/30/10.

 

KEYWORDS: Transparency; Rain Repellency; Optically Clear; Polymer Materials; Coating; Acrylic Treatment

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-136                              TITLE: Non-Destructive Inspection Tool to Measure Sustained Stresses in Metallic

Components to Assess Environmentally Assisted Cracking Susceptibility

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-261; H-53 Heavy Lift Helicopter Program

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate a nondestructive depot level inspection tool capable of quantitatively measuring the magnitude and state of a sustained stress present in the primary aircraft structure.

 

DESCRIPTION: It is widely recognized that a sustained stress can significantly inhibit or accelerate environmentally assisted cracking (Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking) depending on the state and magnitude of the stress. There are various origins of this stress including: clamping forces from fasteners, fit-up and alignment forces, thermal gradients, service history, plastic deformation, and thermo-mechanical processing of the material. While the presence of a sustained stress is sometimes known, quantitative knowledge of the stress state and magnitude is not. The lack of a quantitative characterization technique to assess the stress state/magnitude prohibits informed decision making with regards to the susceptibility of the aircraft structure to premature failure resulting from environmentally assisted cracking. This lack of knowledge has resulted in the reactive stance of high frequency inspections based on flight hours to detect subcritical cracks after they have formed rather than a proactive stance of identifying areas of the aircraft structure with unfavorable stress states/magnitudes and taking the appropriate steps to ensure crack initiation does not occur in service.

 

There is currently a need for a nondestructive inspection tool that can be used at the Fleet Readiness Centers (FRCs) to determine the state and magnitude of a sustained stress in a metallic airframe component. In addition to providing highly reliable/accurate data, the tool must also be practical for operation in a functional depot environment.  Historically, portable X-Ray diffraction devices and technologies based on magneto-elasticity have proven unreliable and only semi-quantitative. A successful tool would be durable, adaptable to components of various size/shape, have an easy to use operator interface, non-labor intensive, and easily integrated into a process flow with minimal disruption. Near-term benefits of this tool would be the establishment of a currently nonexistent diagnostics capability, which will yield improved flight safety and a reduction in inspection cycles for aircraft during fleet operations. The long-term benefit of this tool would be the ability to detect the susceptibility to environmentally assisted cracking for structural components.

 

PHASE I: Develop a nondestructive inspection tool concept capable of quantitatively measuring the state/magnitude of a sustained stress in a structural airframe component. Demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed tool/system by providing diagnostics to determine the potential for crack initiation resulting from Hydrogen Embrittlement.

 

PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate a prototype of the tool/system that can be effectively implemented into an environment equivalent that of a FRC without significantly disrupting the work flow or degrading the reliability of the data. Verify and demonstrate successful function of all requirements.

 

PHASE III: Transition the tool/system to platforms that experience environmentally assisted cracking.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Areas that would benefit from this newly developed tool/system include civil aviation, petroleum/chemical industry, nuclear industry, mining operations, heavy equipment manufactures, and industrial overhaul/repair centers.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Dull, D.L., & Raymond, L. (1972). Stress history effect on incubation time for stress corrosion crack growth in AISI 4340 steel. Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. 3(11). http://www.springerlink.com/content/ml4w011795806502/

 

2.  Committee on Aging of U.S. Air Force Aircraft, Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems, National Research Council (1997). Aging of U.S. Air Force Aircraft: Final Report. Washington D.C., The National Academies Press.

 

3.  Gangloff, R. P. (2005). Critical Issues in Hydrogen Assisted Cracking of Structural

Alloys, Environment Induced Cracking of Metals (EICM-2), Elsevier Science, Oxford. http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA450342&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf

 

KEYWORDS: residual; stress; inspection; environmental; hydrogen; fatigue

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-137                              TITLE: Near Infrared Lasers for High Energy Laser Applications

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors, Electronics, Battlespace, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-242 Direct & Time Sensitive Strike Programs

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop high-energy laser tunable across the near-infrared spectral regime to perform research in eye safe laser design.

 

DESCRIPTION: The development and continued improvements of solid state high energy lasers (SSHEL) enables their consideration for weapon applications and subsystems. The current wavelengths of operation for most SSHELs are considered very hazardous to human eyes, but full assessment of target effectiveness and collateral hazards versus laser wavelength requires experimentation across the range of near-infrared laser wavelengths. A laser system is required that produces high average power output in the 1.3 um to 2.0 um range. Requirements for the development of this laser system are indicated in the table below. Wavelengths in the 1.3 to 2.0 um passband with less than 75% one-way atmospheric transmission per MODTRAN2 need not be considered, so discretely tuned designs are as acceptable as continuously tunable designs. The output beam must be polarized with a M2 beam quality less than 5. Laser output (for commercial system applications) requirements will be 1 kW of output tunable across the indicated passband. Special consideration needs to be applied to the line width of operation at any given wavelength if the design for Phase 3 includes the use of spatial or coherent beam combining (SBC/CBC) or other new techniques and concepts. Innovative designs that address performance, reduced mean-time-between-service as well as reduced total cost of operation or ease of maintenance will receive major consideration.

 

Final laser requires an output of at least 1000 W across the desired spectrum with a stable output power and good quality beam, as this system will be used in biomaterial threshold studies. The beam should be produced for durations greater than 100 seconds per shot, with at least 100 shots per day.

 

This laser is needed to satisfy several requirements. There is a legal requirement (Geneva Convention) to design directed energy weapons that minimize the potential for damage to non-combatants. There is also a military need for minimizing fratricide casualties. This laser can provide information both for the protection of civilians and to help combatant commanders minimize risks to their troops. It can, in the latter regard, aid in the design of protective clothing and glasses. On the civilian side, eye-safer wavelengths can be used with laser countermeasures for civilian aircraft faced with shoulder-fired missile attacks.

 

The design effort should research new laser diode semi-conductor substrates, bar diodes, and other form factors to optimize energy generation in the desired passband.

 

Parameter Lambda range desired Energy/pulse Pulse width A vg power M2 Factor Pulse Stability

Phase I - II 1.3 – 2.0 um 25 kJ >= 100 s >= 250 W 5 <=2%

Phase II 1.3 – 2.0 um 50 kJ >= 100 s >= 500 W <= 5 <=1%

Phase III 1.3 – 2.0 um 100 kJ >= 100 s >=1000 W <=5 <=1%

 

PHASE I: Develop an initial conceptual design for a high-energy laser tunable across the near-infrared spectral regime that meets Navy requirements. Provide a first-order computer model of the designed laser system for use in subsequent design phase. Develop detailed analysis and include methodology and prototype performance that will demonstrate the proposed concept at the specified performance and wavelength tenability.

 

PHASE II: Complete detailed component design. Develop and fabricate prototype suitable for proof of concept testing in a laboratory environment.

 

PHASE III: Fabricate full-scale high power near-infrared tunable laser suitable for an operational environment. Demonstrate all capabilities and SBC/CBC output powers > 10 kW. Transition to commercial and joint services medical uses and Air Force and Navy programs.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Since the output wavelength is in the telecom-relevant regime, it is possible the higher performance will be useful to optical fiber communication and data transfer. The laser will also have commercial medical research applications.

 

REFERENCES:

1. ANSI Z136.1-2007. American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers

 

2. DODI 6055.11. Protection of DoD Personnel from Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation and Military Exempt Lasers

 

KEYWORDS: High Energy Laser; Laser Weapons; Fiber Laser; Eye Safer Laser; Near Infrared; Tunable

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-138                              TITLE: Low Cost G-cues for Pilot Training Device

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Ground/Sea Vehicles, Human Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Joint Strike Fighter, ACAT I

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a low cost means to provide onset acceleration cues to a seated pilot as part of real time immersive training in a flight simulator.

 

DESCRIPTION: The accuracy and reliability of our orientation sensory systems can be distorted when exposed to the unique gravity and inertial cues encountered during varied phases of flight.  Because vestibular and proprioceptive senses can no longer be relied on, pilots must be trained to depend entirely upon their visual cues.  Current flight trainers lack a full capability of inducing the range of onset inertial cues experienced during flight.  The rudimentary motion cues available in today's trainers do improve pilot performance and control behavior in the simulator, particularly for disturbance tasks (such as turbulence) and in aircraft with low dynamic stability (such as helicopters and fighter aircraft). However, further development of such capabilities is needed for our future, more maneuverable (e.g., short take-off and vertical landing) aircraft. 

 

Any safety issues resulting from the proposed design will need to be addressed. Placement of hardware so as not to interfere with existing simulator operation is an important consideration. Cost effectiveness including reliability and maintainability of design approach is an important factor.

 

PHASE I: Conceptualize and design an innovative solution. Demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and propose how to integrate it into an existing flight simulator, and/or added to a desktop training system.

 

PHASE II: Develop and implement preliminary design as a prototype. Validate the design through demonstration of the ability to provide limited yet effective onset motion cues when implemented in a flight simulator.

 

PHASE III: Finalize the product and integrate as a subsystem into new and/or retrofitted flight simulator.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: An improved motion cue for training simulation is needed for both military and commercial flight trainers.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Cheung, B.,  Hofer, K., Heskin, R., & Smith, A. (2004) Physiological and Behavioural Responses to False Sensation of Pitch. Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine; 75:657-665.

 

2.  Burki-Cohen, J. & Sparko, L. (2007). Training Value of a Fixed-Base Flight Simulator with a Dynamic Seat. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference and Exhibit. Hilton Head, SC

 

KEYWORDS: training; motion cue; simulation; flight; pilot; real time

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-139                              TITLE: Exploiting Multipath for Efficient Target Classification

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Sensors, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-231 E-2 / C-2 Program Office

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop an innovative method to improve the efficiency and accuracy of Radar Cross Section (RCS) based target classification by exploiting naturally occurring multipath.

 

DESCRIPTION: Target classification or identification (ID) is often accomplished using radar measurements to determine an “image” of the target in the form of RCS, and then matching the measured image against a database. Doing this with a traditional approach requires collecting and processing large amounts of sensor data over a wide field of view in order to obtain sufficient image quality. Moreover, when multipath is present, as in urban or hilly settings, image quality is degraded, and classification performance suffers. A technology that can exploit environmental multipath to improve the efficiency and quality of RCS imaging, instead of degrading it, to enable faster and more accurate target classification is needed.

 

The goal of this effort is to develop a mathematical basis of the concept to be incorporated into an analytical model, which will be used to prove (or reject) the utility of this approach. Promising approaches may incorporate electromagnetic-based multipath modeling and methods to reconstruct the target’s free-space scattering behavior. Ultimately, experimentation will be performed, in which live data from a controlled multipath environment is collected and processed off-line to develop the RCS signature of an actual target.

 

PHASE I: Perform a detailed analysis and modeling effort to assess the feasibility of an approach to exploit multipath target classification with fewer sensor samples. Identify major technical challenges that if not addressed would limit the suitability of this technology and estimate which technical challenges pose the greatest technical and cost risk.

 

PHASE II: Significantly increase the fidelity of electromagnetic and processing simulation to be more representative of operational environments. Develop and end-to-end prototype system. Evaluate and improve the system using experimental data obtained in a real-world multipath environment.

 

Note: The prospective contractor(s) must be U.S. Owned and Operated with no Foreign Influence as defined by DOD 5220.22-M, National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual, unless acceptable mitigating procedures can and have been be implemented and approved by the Defense Security Service (DSS). The selected contractor and/or subcontractor must be able to acquire and maintain a secret level facility and Personnel Security Clearances, in order to perform on advanced phases of this contract as set forth by DSS and NAVAIR in order to gain access to classified information pertaining to the national defense of the United States and its allies; this will be an inherent requirement. The selected company will be required to safeguard classified material in accordance with DoD 5220.22-M during the advance phases of this contract.

 

PHASE III: Transition the developed technology to appropriate platforms and interested commercial entities.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Target RCS matching is an important element in air traffic control and maritime navigation and control. Success of this topic would benefit those fields. This technology could also be applied to municipal and private security, as well as natural-resource exploration.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Vespe, M, Baker, C.J. & Griffiths, H.D. (2007). Radar target classification using multiple

Perspectives, IET Radar, Sonar & Navigation, 1, (4), pp. 300–307

 

2. You, Y., Hong, S., Min,K., Lee, K., Kwon K. & Jeon, W. (2005). Analysis of OFDM Timing Synchronization Using Multipath Exploitation (Wireless Communication Technologies), IEICE Transactions on Communications E88-B(2):781-783

 

3. Arnaud, D., Brousseau, C., & Bourdillon, A. (2000). Study of flight route effects on aircraft RCS signature at VH frequencies by means of wire grid models. Univ. Radar Conference. The Record of the IEEE 2000 International

 

KEYWORDS: multipath exploitation; RCS signature; target classification; computational electromagnetics; pattern matching; scattering

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-140                              TITLE: Bistatic Radar Receiver/Processor

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Sensors, Electronics

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-290, EP-3E Joint Airborne SIGINT Architecture - ACAT III

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a highly automated digital signal processor (DSP) that receives and processes bistatic radar emissions and displays on an airborne platform.

 

DESCRIPTION: Bistatic radar processing by airborne Signals Intelligence/Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance (SIGINT/ISR) platforms affords covert, passive exploitation of adversary or own-force radar systems to improve tactical situational awareness and fused intelligence products. The system design should have high Radio Frequency (RF) and/or processing gain, wide field-of-regard (360 degree optimal), be capable of being configured via software/firmware to duplicate victim radar’s external operating parameters, thereby emulating victim radar’s receiver functions, and displaying targets and clutter illuminated by victim radars. Innovative design will be required provide technical solution to seemingly contradictory requirements for high system sensitivity with concurrent very wide field-of-regard, and ability to display relatively small RCS targets useful ranges.

 

Additionally, proposed system must be able to automatically correct inherent bistatic cardioid range distortion to provide a range corrected (circular) display. Initial interest is for a system designed for use onboard an aircraft flying up to 180 nm away from the victim radar and capturing the victim radar’s target return picture (curvature of the earth and terrain masking considered), as well as Radar Cross Section (RCS) vs Range dependency considered. System must be able to automatically achieve parameter synchronization (RF/Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF)/Pulse Width (PW)/SCAN/SCAN RATE) with selected victim radar and display radar targets. Proposed designs contain provisions for input of additional digital/analog signals/data, such as Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) data, for simultaneous display with bistatic radar data (spare channel inputs).

 

PHASE I: Determine technical feasibility of automating the capture and display bistatic radar signals, and optimizing primary bistatic performance parameters.

 

PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate prototype bistatic radar system with optimized sensitivity and ability to integrate additional signals using simulated signals and targets.

 

PHASE III: Define emitters to be exploited and develop display ranges versus RCS versus radar Effective Radiated Power (ERP) tables for those emitters. Transition technology to appropriate platform. Expected Navy transition platforms include P-8, EP-3E, EP-X.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Commercial Vessel Navigation Backup (ability to use coastal and/or harbor radars to provide additional weather and radar/navigation information), Counter-Drug Enforcement (provides for covert means to track vessels of interest without alerting target vessels to the presence of Counter Drug Forces.).

 

REFERENCES:

1. Willis, N. J. (2005). Bistatic Radar. Raleigh: SciTech Publishing, Inc.

 

2. Willis, N. J., & Griffiths, H. D. (2007)Advances in Bistatic Radar. Raleigh: SciTech Publishing, Inc.

 

3. Skolnik, M. I. (2008) Radar Handbook (3rd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill Professional

 

KEYWORDS: Bistatic Radar; Receiver/Processor; High Sensitivity; Passive Radar Exploitation; SIGINT; Auto-Range Correction

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-141                              TITLE: Non Destructive Material Case Depth Verification

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-299, H-60 Helicopter Program

 

OBJECTIVE: Accurately determine the case depth of hardened (carburized, nitrided, induction, etc.) aerospace materials by non-destructive means without the use of traditional destructive method of cross-sectioned specimens (hardness-traverse method).

 

DESCRIPTION: The Naval aviation community as owner and operator of aerospace systems continuously seeks improvement in the manufacturing arena. The Navy occasionally faces issues with inadequately case hardened aerospace components. One major issue is the determination of case-depth hardness of the materials. The industry standard method is to cross-section the specimen for a hardness-traverse measurement. This destructive inspection requires random sampling and can be quite expensive if there is a suspect population of non-conforming parts and a high demand for the suspect product. Developing a cost effective, accurate, hand held, innovative, non-destructive technology that would allow these case hardened parts to be inspected (measure case depth) without being destroyed, would increase the possibility of identifying non-conforming parts early in the production process.  This would result in a decrease in cost to the government or OEMs by removing the need to inspect numerous suspect components by means of destroying potential conforming components.  Develop innovative technology capable of measuring the case depth by non-destructive means of carburized aerospace gears (flank, face, pitch circle, fillet radius)l.

 

PHASE I: Design and demonstrate feasibility of a technology to measure case depth of hardened aerospace materials (carburized materials, gears).

 

PHASE II: Develop, demonstrate and validate the non-destructive case depth measuring technology for carburized materials.  Refine the models for accuracy by accounting for geometry, material characteristics, ratio of case thickness to tooth thickness.  Refine and conduct a prototype demonstration to characterize technology capability.

 

PHASE III: Conduct necessary qualification testing and finalize the non-destructive case depth measuring technology for transition to both military and commercial applications (gears, bearings, splines, shafts, etc).

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This technology would be applicable to aerospace and non-aerospace case hardening (carburize, nitride, induction, etc.) supply sources.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Chandler, H. (1999).  Hardness Testing.  Publisher: ASM International; 2 Sub edition

 

2.  Cuffe, J., Sun, H., Plotnikov, Y., Nath, S., & Sheila-Vadde, A. (2008).  Eddy Current Measurement of Case Hardened Depth of Steel Components, From 17th World Conference on Nondestructive Testing, Shangahai, China. Accessed online http://www.docstoc.com/docs/15948383/Eddy-Current-Measurement-of-Case-Hardened-Depth-of-Steel

 

KEYWORDS: non-destructive inspection; hand held; case hardened; steel; aerospace components; carburized materials

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-142                              TITLE: Improved Gear Carburization Process

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA 261 CH-53K Heavy Lift Helicopter Program

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a robust carburizing method for deep internal splines with a high aspect ratio.

 

DESCRIPTION: The most common carburizing processes for aerospace gearing are conventional gas carburizing and vacuum carburizing.  Both of these methods rely on carburizing gas circulation to achieve uniform carburization of surfaces.  For both carburizing methods, a high part aspect ratio (e.g. internal bore length to the internal bore diameter ratio of greater than 3:1) can cause a reduction / restriction of gas circulation to the internal volume of the part, which limits the producibility of the carburized internal features such as splines.

 

Innovative carburizing processes are sought for internal, potentially high aspect ratio surfaces that provides uniform coverage and case hardening depth and the avoidance of free-carbon formation or sooting.  Target applications for this technology are gears ranging in size from 4 to 44 inches in diameter, including Herringbone Pinions with an internal aspect ratio of approximately 5:1.  The proposed process should also be efficient in energy usage and time allotment and conducive to mass production. 

 

PHASE I: Develop the concept and demonstrate the technical feasibility of the proposed carburizing method. Define mass production requirements and obstacles.

 

PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate the process through the carburization of representative internal spline samples along with evaluation and testing of the samples.

 

PHASE III: Complete all required qualification/certification testing and transition the technology to the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM's).

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: An improved internal gear carburization process would be beneficial for commercial aviation, automotive and commercial and military nautical applications.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  AMS-2759/6 - Gas Nitriding and Heat Treatment of Low-Alloy Steel Parts. http://www.sae.org/technical/standards/AMS2759/6B

 

2.  AMS-2759/7 - Carburizing and Heat Treatment of Carburizing Grade Steel Parts. http://www.sae.org/technical/standards/AMS2759/7A

 

3.  Osterman, V.M., (2005, September). Heat Treating: Development Experience in Low-Torr Range Vacuum Carburizing. Industrial Heating. http://www.industrialheating.com/Articles/Feature_Article/9bb06f4ed965e010VgnVCM100000f932a8c0

 

KEYWORDS: Carburize; Gear; Transmission; Hardening; Pressure; Gas

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-143                              TITLE: Nondestructive Inspection Technique Capable of Detecting and Characterizing

Bridging

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-261:  H-53 Heavy Lift Helicopter Program

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a nondestructive inspection technique capable of detecting and characterizing bridging in graphite/epoxy and fiberglass/epoxy laminate parts with tight radii.

 

DESCRIPTION: Ply bridging in laminate materials with tight radii can result from improper manufacturing processes.  Bridging is an area within a laminate material with tight radii in which the plys are not completely filling the radius. Bridging reduces structural strength, and its detection and characterization is of importance to the Navy. Having a means of detecting and quantifying bridging would significantly improve the quality control process of thick composite parts subject to defects of this kind. While computed tomography radiographic techniques have been used in the past, they are expensive, generally limited to parts less than two feet in width, and unreliable when the plies are nearly in contact with each other. For these reasons, an affordable nondestructive tool is desired to reliably detect, measure, and characterize bridging in tight radii. The primary materials of focus are graphite/epoxy and fiberglass/epoxy laminates of various geometries and up to 0.75 inch thick. Detection of bridging throughout the thickness of the part is required. Consideration also should to be given to other materials or obstructions that may exist between layers in a part. Composite bridging must be detectable in and around molded-in metal sections of the component under inspection.

 

PHASE I: Develop and demonstrate feasibility of an innovative technology that detects and measures bridging in graphite/epoxy and fiberglass/epoxy laminate materials with tight radii. Manufacture or procure necessary laminate samples for feasibility demonstration.

 

PHASE II: Develop, construct and demonstrate a prototype for characterization testing and evaluation, capable of detecting and quantifying bridging. Demonstrations should be performed using samples that are manufactured or procured and that are representative of what can be expected in the Fleet.

 

PHASE III: Transition the developed nondestructive evaluation (NDE) device to interested platforms and commercial interests.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Quality control process improvements from this technology would be applicable to any industry that is using composite material construction; i.e.; automotive, wind turbines, ship building, and commercial aircraft.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Krishnamurthy, C. V., Shankar, M., Vardhan, J. V., & Balasubramaniam, K. (2006). The 2004 ultrasonic benchmark problem - sdh response under oblique incidence: Measurements and patch element model calculations. Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation. Volume 25B, 25B, 1820-1827.

 

2. Walker, J. L., Russell, S. S., & Workman, G. L. (1998). Thermographic qualification of graphite/epoxy instrumentation racks. Paper presented at the Proceedings of SPIE: Nondestructive Evaluation of Aging Aircraft, Airports, and Aerospace Hardware II. San Antonio, TX; USA; 31 Mar.-2 Apr.; Proceedings of SPIE: Nondestructive Evaluation of Aging Aircraft, Airports, and Aerospace Hardware II, San Antonio, TX; USA. 141-148.

 

3. Muralidhar, C., Lukose, S. N., & Subramanian, M. P. (2007). Evaluation of turbine blades using computed tomography. Journal of Nondestructive Testing, 12(3)

 

KEYWORDS: bridging; radius; composite; nondestructive inspection; nondestructive testing; void

 

Questions may also be submitted through DoD SBIR/STTR SITIS website.

 

 

 

N102-144                              TITLE: Hazardous Material Satellite Storage Lockers

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes, Space Platforms

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMS 312

 

OBJECTIVE: To develop satellite storage lockers for the stowage of hazardous materials to meet the evolving needs of the Fleet, including high corrosion and fire resistance, and durability.

 

DESCRIPTION: All U.S. Navy Ships require the use of Hazardous Materials (HM) for daily Shipboard operations.  Types of required HM include, but are not limited to, hydraulic fluid, lubricating oil, paint, adhesives, acids, and corrosives.  Per reference (1) and the Consolidated Hazardous Material Reutilization and Inventory Management Program (CHRMIP), Ships are outfitted with designated HM stowage spaces, such as Flammable Liquid Storerooms, for the bulk storage of HM.  These designated spaces are designed to include dedicated fire protection systems, explosion proof electrical fixtures, and forced ventilation.  Obtaining material from these spaces requires a member of the Supply Department to conduct a transaction in the Hazardous Material Inventory Control System – Windows (HICSWIN) upon issue and return of the material.

 

In order for Ship’s Force to work more efficiently, NAVSEA approved the use of satellite storage lockers, which are placed in the Ship’s workcenters, to store a seven (7) day supply of daily use HM.  The Ship’s HM Coordinator must approve the use and final location of all satellite storage lockers on a case-by-case basis.  Satellite storage lockers allow Ship’s Force to work more efficiently by stowing the most frequently used HM in appropriate work spaces.  Without the use of satellite lockers, Ship’s Force would be required to conduct HM transactions several times a day for both issuing and returning, transiting from their work space to the appropriate issue location for material.  By utilizing satellite storage lockers, Ship’s Force must still conduct an issue/return transaction; however, this only occurs once for each material over the course of seven (7) days. 

 

There are two types of hazardous material storage lockers approved for Shipboard use: Flammable Liquid Lockers and Corrosive Liquid Storage Lockers.  Manufacturers that produce these lockers are Justrite Manufacturing Company, Delta Industries, Inc., and The Protectoseal Company.  Per reference (2), Approved Flammable Liquid Storage Lockers range in size from ten (10) gallon capacity to a maximum of thirty (30) gallons; approved Corrosive Liquid Storage Lockers range in size from two (2) gallons to thirty (30) gallons.  Per reference (2), the requirements for locker approval are as follows:

 

Flammable Liquid Storage Lockers Requirements

1. Must meet the requirements of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Code 30,

2. Meet Grade B shock requirements per Military Specification MIL-S-901,

3. Self-Closing doors,

4. Lockable, and

5. Yellow.

 

Corrosive Liquid Storage Lockers Requirements

1. Must meet the requirements of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Code 30,

2. Meet Grade B shock requirements per Military Specification MIL-S-901,

3. Internal shelves fitted with Polyethylene trays or liners to contain internal spills,

4. Self-Closing doors,

5. Lockable, and

6. Blue or white.

 

In addition to Flammables and Corrosives, Calcium Hypochlorite is also required for emergency potable water purification and Chemical and Biological Warfare defense operations.  Calcium Hypochlorite is currently stowed in modified first-aid lockers mounted to the Ship’s bulkhead.  Modifications to the lockers include repainting and drilling vent holes to dissipate fumes. The first-aid lockers are constructed of aluminum; however, due to the oxidizing properties of Calcium Hypochlorite, the lockers deteriorate quickly.

 

NSWCCD Code 635 recommends the investigation of corrosion resistant alternatives to aluminum construction for Calcium Hypochlorite storage lockers.  These alternatives include corrosion resistant coatings and corrosion resistant materials, such as polyethylene.  Lockers should be able withstand varying levels of shock and vibration as caused by Ship movement and operations.  Completely non-metallic lockers could potentially provide the corrosion resistance necessary; however, shock requirements and flammability properties need to be tested.  Non-metallic alternatives to the already-approved Corrosive Liquid Storage Lockers, would also lead to a decrease in weight, as steel lockers range in weight from 60 to 225 pounds.

 

All lockers shall be mountable to the bulkhead or to the deck and shall be lockable.  All hinges and brackets shall be corrosion resistant, either through a coating application or material selection.  Lockers shall have vent holes to dissipate fumes.  Calcium hypochlorite lockers shall be able to stow a minimum of forty-eight (48) six (6) ounce bottles (NSN: 6840-00-255-0471).

 

Additionally, non-metallic lockers have applications in the Minesweeper Ship Class. Due to the nature of the Minesweeper Class’s mission parameters, non-magnetic equipment is required.

 

PHASE I: Provide recommendations and rationale for the appropriate size lockers required to maximize Shipboard efficiency.   Develop innovation solution to this storage locker issue.  Develop detail description and production cost estimate of the proposed concept. Descibe what special installation requirements for a non-metallic storage locker in a compartment.

 

PHASE II: Fabricate small, medium and large prototype versions of the locker for testing and evaluation. Evaluate durability (i.e. corrosion resistance, flammability, smoke generation and shock/vibration properties), useability and application testing on non-metallic storage lockers.  Evaluate the lockers in a labratory.  Refine detail description and production cost estimate of the proposed concept.

 

PHASE III: Refine the design based on Phase III and fabricate pre-production prototypes for shipboard evaluation.  Support shipboard installation and evaluation. Refine detail description and production cost estimate of the proposed concept.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Lockers resistant to highly corrosive materials are relevant to any activity or Command that utilizes hazardous materials in the workplace.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Chief of Naval Operations Instructions (OPNAVINST) 5100.19E

 

2. Naval Ship’s Technical Manual (NSTM) Chapter 670

 

3. Naval Vessel Rules (NVR), Part 5 “Auxiliary Machinery Systems”, Chapter 7 “Environmental Protection Systems”, Section 13 “Hazardous Material Management – Shipboard Control”, dated 15 July 2004

 

KEYWORDS: Hazardous Material, Flammable, Corrosive, Oxidizer, Lockers

 

 

 

N102-145                              TITLE: Enabling netted sensor fusion for anti-submarine warfare in uncertain and

variable environments

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Sensors, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: AN/UYQ-100 Undersea Warfare Decision Support System (USW-DSS) ACAT IV-T

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate convergent, dynamic registration of uncertain, biased ASW sensor data from multiple carrier strike group platforms for command and control (C2) to enable shared, distributed classification, localization and prosecution of adversaries in real time.

 

DESCRIPTION: Net-centric warfare exploits the fact that platforms and sensors can be netted together with communication links to form a system or net that is greater than the sum of its parts.

 

Sensor netting is fundamentally different from the current practice of transmitting highly processed track information between units.  A good example is the Navy's Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) which links together air and missile defense assets in ways that allow one platform to guide a missile launched by another at a target first detected by a third. (Ref: Cote and Sapolsky, MIT Security Studies Program) The CEC construct is not directly applicable in the uniquely complex undersea environment; detection ranges against a very quiet target are short, wideband communications all but non-existent and spatial and temporal variability make netted sensor registration requirements difficult to achieve.  As a starting point, this solicitation seeks a probabilistic treatment for resolving bias in undersea netted sensor data.  The approach must reduce the correlation errors and mis-associations that degrade netted system performance due to bias and correlation inconsistency.  The final research product will be a sensor gridlocking algorithm that converges to an accurate registration of uncertain undersea sensor data from distributed ASW sensors on multiple platforms.

 

PHASE I: Conduct the needed R&D to identify and define the algorithms and processes to enable effective gridlocking and registration of ASW sensors on multiple platforms.  Provide the analysis for a candidate approach, document the conceptual designs and provide in a final Phase I report.

 

PHASE II: Complete the additional R&D required to develop and demonstrate a prototype tool that will incorporate viable candidates to support Gridlocking and Registration of ASW sensors. Provide the assessment of the total impact for the Navy’s improvement in ASW command and control (C2) to improve classification and/or localization of adversaries in time for effective Anti-Submarine actions to be achieved.  Deliver algorithm description, procedures for use, test results, Phase III plan.

 

PHASE III: This algorithm must transition to multiple platforms through multiple programs as an enabler for net-centric ASW.  This will be achieved by teaming the SBIR contractor and Navy personnel to accomplish the transition of the technology to the USW-DSS program of record and the Surface Ship Advanced Capability Build program as part of the coordinated fusion and sensor netting programs.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Algorithms/tools can be used in commercial rescue/salvage, and or oil exploration to provide operators with improved correlation among undersea exploration sensors.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Endsley, M. R., Bolte, B., & Jones, D. G. Designing for Situation Awareness: An approach to human-centered design. London: Taylor & Francis (2003)

 

2. Hall, David L, McMullen, Sonya A.H., Mathematical Techniques in Multisensor Data Fusion, 2nd ed.  Norwood, MA:  Artech House (2004)

 

3. Hall, David L, Llinas, James, Handbook of Multisensor Data Fusion. New York: CRC Press (2001)

 

4. Blackman, Samuel, Popoli, Robert, Design and Analysis of Modern Tracking Systems.  Norwood, MA:  Artech House (1999)

 

KEYWORDS: Network; Fusion; Command and Control; Cognition; Registration

 

 

 

N102-146                              TITLE: Field powder coating application

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Radar Restoration, OMN, PE s/b 0702228N

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a Powder Coating material, process of application,  and prototype applicator that can be used aboard ship for in place application to apertures and similar topside metal fixtures.

 

DESCRIPTION: Two critical areas for successful field powder coating are (1) environmentally robust application techniques and (2) field curing technology and coating formulation.  While commercially available technology can deliver and deposit powder to a metal surface, the spray pattern and over spray are unsuitable and impossible to direct in any but a controlled environment.  Innovative techniques are required to allow the operator to keep the powder close to the substrate without allowing the electrodes to get close enough to cause arcing to a grounded substrate.  Field application studies involving resin, catalyst and additives to optimize performance, and Nanotechnology need to be conducted and coating formulas will need to be developed and evaluated for suitability with the application techniques which minimize or eliminate current controlled substrate preheating requirements.  Field curing technology and coating formulation of superior corrosion performance coatings must be developed and evaluated for field application.

 

PHASE I: Analyze and  research current powder formulation technology to develop a powder coating formula to optimize anti-corrosive performance in harsh, marine environments for maximum life-cycle extension of treated assets. Experiment with various powder formulations to determine effectiveness for use with Governmental field application. Via analysis determine application process, recommend appropriate materials, and design a prototype to accomplish application for ship board in place application of the selected powder coating (s).

 

PHASE II: Develop and validate a prototype powder coating,  Field Application process, and Curing system for repair of small areas.  Develop appropriate manufacturing technology for producing uniform consistent product as well as developing capability for manufacture of the application technology for Governmental and commercial use.

 

PHASE III: Transition the Phase II technology to Navy in-service radar systems through the Above Water Sensor radar restoration program.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: A (mobile) local Powder Coating application can be applied to any metal surface Government or Industry.

 

REFERENCES:

1. MIL-C-5541E - Chemical Conversion Coatings on Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

 

2. MIL-A-8625 F - Anodic Coatings for Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

 

3. MIL-C-24712A Coatings, Powder

 

KEYWORDS: Powder Coating; Application; Field Curing; Plasma; Flame Spray; Localized Cure

 

 

 

N102-147                              TITLE: Develop Valid Performance Measures for Multi-tasking Environments

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Human Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Combat Systems Training ACAT II, Warfare Systems Training PEO IWS

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

The requirement to perform more than one task in a limited period of time is prevalent in many work environments, where multi-tasking (MT) has been associated with stress and burnout in such areas as air traffic control, emergency dispatch, and nursing (Josslyn & Hunt, 1998).  Within the Navy, development of new surface ships with reduced manning (e.g., LCS, DDX) has created the conditions for increased MT as fewer crewmembers must perform a greater number and variety of tasks within a time-constrained environment. Observational studies, coupled with incumbent interviews, have identified several major “themes” that characterize MT environments, such as having to manage risk by maintaining situational awareness, making multiple decisions rapidly, monitoring the flow of multiple tasks simultaneously, and monitoring multiple sources of information (Fischer & Mautone, 2005).  While we know from anecdotal reports and informal observations that MT demands can be very high under certain operational conditions, and seem to vary considerably across different tactical settings and job domains, we lack validated measures of MT performance that allow us to both substantiate these claims and quantify their impact on overall Fleet readiness, system effectiveness, as well as individual and team performance. 

The development of a suite or battery of MT measures of performance will yield enormous dividends to the Fleet.  For example, armed with the ability to measure MT performance accurately and precisely, recruiting, training and personnel detailing processes could benefit from identification of jobs that require greater demands in MT.  In addition, the MT measures could be used in person-in-the loop simulations to validate Modeling and Simulation (M&S) design efforts where crew models of time-pressured tasking have been constructed. Training resource and personnel selection criteria (via tests of MT ability) could then be allocated to targeted areas of greatest MT.  Also, through more judicious application of HSI designs, it would be possible to determine whether, and if so by how much, MT demands have been reduced, resulting in lower ownership costs and improved system/ship operational effectiveness.  In short, development of a set of valid measures of MT performance for the Fleet environment will provide empirical information that can be utilized by the manning, personnel selection, HSI design, and training development communities so that better multi-taskers can be assigned to high-demand MT environments, redesigned systems engineering to reduce MT demands, and MT training interventions targeted for jobs and settings where MT skill is most important.

 

Development of these unique performance measures will require the construction of a measurement model that provides a systematic representation of the dynamic relationship of environmental, temporal, behavioral, attitudinal, and cognitive variables on MT performance.  While it is expected that existing theories of cognitive behavior, such as multiple resource theory (Wickens, 2002) and rapid decision-making (Gillan, 2002), will provide useful concepts, original theoretical work will be needed to apportion the candidate measures of MT performance across objective (e.g., amount of work activity performed per unit time, response time, number of errors) and subjective (e.g., self-rated reports of resource “exhaustion”, workload) metrics. 

 

In particular, we believe a successful measurement model will have the following characteristics.  First, the model must result in measures that are dynamic and which capture the temporal basis of information-based task processing.  As such, these should be process measures rather than static.  Second, the measures should encompass cognitive meta-competency skills that will underlie many of the tasks that surface ship operators must perform.  Examples include, but should not be limited to, such areas as situational awareness, critical thinking, adaptive decision-making, and attention management.  Third, the measures, when collected in the context of vignette/scenarios, should yield fairly precise indications of when multi-tasking demands have been exceeded, thereby helping to pinpoint where multi-tasking strategies can be employed.  Examples here include task shedding, task prioritization, and task delegation, among others.  Fourth, the measures should be sufficiently robust that they can tie into programs aimed at promoting time-critical risk management to improve safety at the rate, mission area, and ship level.  A measurement model that helps delineate where and why multi-tasking demands breakdown can then be fed back into strategic-level initiatives concerning talent/manpower management and sustained combat operations at-sea.

 

In terms of validation, application of a robust MT measurement model will result in content, construction, and criterion validation (Cronbach, 1984).  The measurement model should not only guide the specification of existing MT measures of performance to a given work environment, it should also support identification and development of new measures as different job/task settings and new or modified mission requirements are considered. 

 

In Phase I, the research team should perform a detailed literature search to identify candidate measures of MT performance in the areas of objective behavior specification, cognitive processes, and attitudinal factors.  A report should be produced that presents a measurement model and a roadmap for performing validation studies in Phase II.  A successful Phase I will have established a proof of concept that a cohesive set of MT measures of performance can be created for job domains under various mission contexts and time constraints of interest to the Navy.

 

In Phase II, the research team should take the measurement model and apply the candidate measures of MT performance to at least two different Navy job domains.  Validation studies should be performed to support the extent to which the candidate measures satisfy requirements for content, construct, and criterion validity.  The impact of various environmental and HSI factors on MT performance should also be part of the validation studies.  Both qualitative and quantitative indices of MT demands should result from the studies, where an economy of scale should be established in taking the measures created in the first job domain and applying/adapting them to the second.  A “roll-out” plan for applying both the measurement model and the associated MT performance measures to a broader range of Navy job domains under varying degrees of time-critical performance requirements should be a prominent part of the Phase II final report and out brief.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Cronbach, L.J. (1984). Essentials of psychological testing (4th ed). New York: Harper & Row.

 

2. Fischer, S.F. & Mautone, P.D. (2005, August). Multi-tasking assessment for personnel selection and development. (ARI Contractor Report 2005-07). Washington, DC: US Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences.

 

3. Gillan, C.A. (2002). Aircrew adaptive decision-making: A cross-case analysis. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of San Diego.

 

4. Josslyn, S. & Hunt, E. (1998). Evaluating individual differences in response to time pressure situations. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 4(1), 16-43.

 

5. Wickens, C. (2002). Multiple resources and performance prediction. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 3.2, 150-177.

 

KEYWORDS: Multi-tasking, cognitive skill, performance assessment, job selection, job placement

 

 

 

N102-148                              TITLE: Develop Radar Radome Materials, Processes and Test Methodology

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: NA, IWS 2.0 will use this technology on developing high power radar systems

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this topic is to develop novel materials and/or processes to provide improved Shipboard Radome performance for Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) systems and operational assessment technologies to mitigate risk and impact of Radome interactions with array Transmit/Receive modules. 

 

DESCRIPTION: Future naval surface combatants and need innovative radome materials with improved performance and manufacturability. These composite radome structures provide protection for the radar array face; however, they can also operationally impact/interact with active array elements leading to the potential for decreased system performance, element performance degradation, decreased mean time between failure of Transmit/Receive modules, and overall life cycle cost increase of the radar system logistics support. This topic seeks to identify advanced and innovative materials and processes for the manufacture of high power radar radomes and also test methodologies to assess interactions with array face and elements so that unintended performance degradation of system and array modules can be avoided or predicted. The research sought will develop new materials and processes that provide improved operational performance beyond the current state-of-the-art radome materials and processes. The materials cannot negatively impact radar Transmit/Receive module performance.

 

Radomes are required to provide protection for high power AMDR radars, EW systems and system Transmit/Receive modules. The developed radome materials shall provide improved performance in terms of RF loss, dielectric constant, thermal expansion;  robust environmental stability in terms of electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of the radome when exposed to solvents, uv radiation, high environmental thermal loads, moisture and solvents; and, manufacturability for end application usage. Representative performance metrics will be system dependent, and the project should seek to address these representative parameters for their intended transition system.  The proposed radome structures shall be of a sandwiched construction, it shall be applicable to S and/or X Band radar applications and it will provide amplitude and phase uniformity. Notational performance parameters that shall be addresses by this project include:

 

Specification                    Parameter Value                                   Test Condition

Electrical:

Dielectric Constant          System Specific Value                           ASTM D2520

Loss Tangent                   System Specific Value                           ASTM D3380 at System

                                                                                                         Specified Frequency

 

Physical:

Thickness                         System Specific Value

Water Absobsion              0.5 weight % maximum

 

Environmental:

Temperature                     -30 C to +80 C                                       -65 C to +100 C Non-operating

Relative Humidity            up to 95%

Salt Atmosphere               Standard Shipboard Requirements

Chemical solvents             Standard Shipboard Requirements

Radiation                           Solar, RF, UV, IR

Vibration Shock                100G, 6 ms                                            Sawtooth

 

PHASE I: Conduct research and development to identify, formulate, and model performance of innovative radome materials. Design proposed radome configurations using the new materials that significantly improve radome performance and develop testing methodologies that characterize performance and interactions between radomes and the active T/R modules the materials protect.

 

PHASE II: Based on the results and materials identified in Phase I, develop and test a prototype radome for application to a Navy program. In support of the testing process, the company will develop an RF test methodology and metrics applicable to the testing of radomes using the new materials and configurations.

 

PHASE III: The Small Business will team with Navy to transition the phase II developed technologies into a developing high power radar system. The developed technology will be exercised within the transition system to demonstrate the performance improvement, increased reliability, test time reduction and/or cost reduction.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  Radomes are needed by military and civilian radars to provide protection to the radar array face.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Volakis, John C. "Radomes, Materials and Design Data, Frequency Selective Surfaces". Antenna Engineering Handbook, 4th ed. Pp. 53-1 - 56-25. McGraw Hill Publishing, 2007.

 

2. The Handbook of Antenna Design, Vol. 2. A. W. Rudge (Editor), A. David Olver (Editor), K. Milne (Editor), P. Knight (Editor). Institution of Electrical Engineers.

 

3. Antenna Engineering Handbook. Richard C. Johnson, Henry Jasik (Editor) McGraw-Hill Companies, The.

 

KEYWORDS: Radar, EW, ESA, Radome, test, RF, Advanced Materials

 

 

 

N102-149                              TITLE: Novel Materials for Small and Medium Caliber Projectiles

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: .50 Cal, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, Close In Weapon System

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and evaluate candidate novel materials that demonstrate improved target damage, improved lethality and improved battle damage indicators.

 

DESCRIPTION: The current small and medium caliber weapon systems utilize projectile that rely strictly on kinetic energy to provide damage to the target.  The ability to couple that kinetic energy with a material that provides a significant chemical energy release (such as a reactive material) is desirable for increased weapon performance in addition to enhanced battle damage indicators. There are several challenges associated with this tasking such as: material strength, material density, and energy release over the velocity range of 2500 ft/s - 3500 ft/s.  Research and development is required to develop novel materials and innovative processes to achieve the mechanical properties (of the projectile) necessary to survive launch, penetrate the target, and deliver the chemical energy in a way that improves the lethality of the round

 

PHASEI:  Conduct research and development pertaining to the investigation of the structural, mechanical and chemical properties of candidate novel materials. Begin modeling effort to characterize material survivability during gun launch, material break up, and energy release on target impact.

 

PHASE II:  Generate scaled samples of materials identified in Phase I to evaluate and measure the chemical energy output and the ability of the candidate materials to withstand gun launch. Perform ballistic and target impact analysis of candidate solutions. Update launch and impact model to reflect test data. Perform an assessment of each material’s ability to increase battle damage indicators over status quo.

 

PHASE III:  Build full scale assets from the most promising candidate solutions.  Provide samples for further testing at Navy facility.  Test launch survivability, ballistics, target damage and BDI compared to existing assets.  Transition will be contingent upon the choice of the most appropriate caliber(s) for technology transition.  The contractor will work with the applicable Navy Program Office in qualifying new projectile configurations.  Qualifications will include Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) assessments, test firings and Insensitive Munitions (IM) assessments and/or testing, as required.  Any impact to IM will be coordinated with the PEO IWS IM Coordinator.

 

This technology could potentially be applied to larger caliber weapons but will require investigation of the impact of a scaled up approach from the small/med caliber size to larger projectiles.  An analysis will need to be conducted that address performance of larger projectiles, cost of larger masses of the novel materials and the costs to scale the manufacturing process.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  Law Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security.  Increase round performance and even battle damage indicators could prove useful in law enforcement and DHS operations.  Less rounds to complete an operation and a “hit” indication would be a few of the benefits.

 

REFERENCES:

1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reactive_material

 

2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx_CIWS

 

3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M230_Chain_Gun

 

4. Advanced Energetic Materials, Committee on Advanced Energetic Materials and Manufacturing Technologies, National Research Council. National Academy of Sciences, 2004. http://www.nap.edu/catalog/10918.html

 

KEYWORDS: projectile; reactive material; small caliber gun; medium caliber gun; incendiary; bullet

 

 

 

N102-150                              TITLE: Broad Band Fiber Lasers (Wavelength of ~500nm to 1800nm)

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Laser Weapon System/Close In Weapon System

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Perform the required R&D in support of design trade studies to determine best approach to develop a laboratory prototype laser that can produce laser light with a wavelength between approximately 500 nm to 1800 nm either as an instantaneous bandwidth, or continuously sweep wavelength over the desired bandwidth with the sweep time less than 1 millisecond.  Meeting the R&D challenges will result in laser output beam quality that should be better than 3X the diffraction limit, be continuous wave (CW) or pulsed with the pulse repetition rate better than 1000 Hz, and an average power of greater than 50 watts.  The laser should be able to run continuously for more than 10 minutes with no loss of average power or beam quality. A successful design will lead to improved potential for broadband communications and increased opportunities for electro-optic jamming.  The military transition is envisioned to be integrated into LaWS (Laser Weapon System).

 

DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this topic is to develop a broadband (500 nm – 1800 nm) laser source based on existing technology or through R&D achieved improvements to current laser technology which enables the end user to project broadband laser energy either CW or pulsed with relatively high repetition rates of 1000 Hz minimum.  The contractor shall perform the R&D so that the system may employ nonlinear devices or novel technologies which achieve the stated requirements and allow for control of output beam quality and divergence.  The results of this work effort will enable solutions for applications of interest to the U.S. Navy, including, but not limited to, directed energy (DE) weapons, countermeasures to electro-optic (EO) systems, target illumination with a frequency agile source, and atmospheric transmission studies in situ.

 

Nonlinear devices such as optical parametric oscillators (OPO’s) have provided tunable output when pumped by an appropriate laser source however, they are generally limited in bandwidth by properties associated with the nonlinear material such as absorption and/or reduced nonlinear coefficients as one tunes away from the degenerate point.  Fiber lasers offer opportunities for broadband output via various doping elements and amplification through multiple stages of optical gain systems.  Currently R&D programs involving new dopant schemes and various glass media have created lasers which provide more options for visible to near infrared output than previously realized by former solid state laser designs.  Some of the remaining R&D challenges involving higher power fiber lasers stem from parasitic loss mechanisms such as Brillouin and Raman scattering which require changes in fiber design necessary to suppress such loss mechanisms.

 

Improved wall plug efficiency for future shipboard laser systems will be critical with respect to power management and the reduction of strain on existing ship based power resources.  Thermal management as well as the ability to yield a relatively stable and compact laser system is also important for integration of hardware onto existing and newer ship designs.  Mitigation of environmental impact as a result of operating in a maritime environment is important towards increasing mean time between failure for total system operation as well as key components in the device design.

 

PHASE I: The contractor would most likely conduct supporting research and analysis of possible system approaches towards development of a broadband laser source with wavelength output between 500 nm – 1800 nm.  The work should establish plausible and realizable technological solutions achievable within a two year time frame for subsequent design, development and testing of a working device.  Cost analysis as well as material development should be included in the study so as to ascertain critical needs not yet fully developed or readily available given current technology.  The design should illustrate strong potential towards meeting or exceeding the program objectives.

 

PHASE II: Based on a successful Phase I development, complete the required R&D identified in support of the development.  An experimental prototype device should be designed end to end and sub components machined and assembled in concert with demonstrated performance objectives.  A finished prototype should be tested for compliance to all objectives with repeatable results and established mean time between failure data on the system prototype and subcomponents.  Data packages on all critical subcomponents will be provided throughout the development cycle and test results will be provided for regular review of progress.  It is expected that a working prototype will be capable of demonstrating 85% or more of the expected bandwidth as well as stated power levels of 50 watts for 90% of the device bandwidth in addition to the operational capability of 10 minutes continuous without degradation to device or device performance.

 

PHASE III: The prototype laser system developed in Phase II will be ruggedized for testing in a maritime environment.  This device will also be fine tuned and engineered for deployment in both civilian and military applications.  The testing requirements will be specific to each application and will be created in concert with available resources and platforms where testing is anticipated.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This device has strong potential uses in the private and University sectors where chemical and physical property analysis of materials is currently performed by spectroscopic processes employing broadband tunable sources.  Furthermore, the medical device development community may find this device applicable towards their interest in development of non-invasive methods for determining fluid chemistry in both research and direct medical applications.

 

REFERENCES:

1. P.F. Wysocki, M.J.F. Digonnet, and B.Y. Kim, “Broad-spectrum, wavelength-swept, erbium-doped fiber laser at 1.55 µm”, Optics Letters, Aug. 15, 1990 vol. 15, No. 16, pp. 879-881

 

2. M. J. F. Digonnet, Rare Earth Doped Fiber Lasers and Amplifiers, 2nd edition., CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL (2001)

 

3. A. Galvanauskas, “Mode-scalable fiber-based chirped pulse amplification systems”, IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 7, 504 (2001)

    

4. R. G. Smith, “Optical power handling capacity of low loss optical fibers as determined by stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering”, Appl. Opt (11), 289 (1972)

    

5. V. I. Kovaloev and R. G. Harrison, “Suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering in high-power single-frequency fiber amplifiers”, Opt. Lett. 31 (2), 161 (2006)

 

KEYWORDS: Optical parametric oscillator, fiber laser, Brillouin scattering, Raman scattering, nonlinear, directed energy, Laser Weapon System (LaWS)

 

 

 

N102-151                              TITLE: Innovative Ship/Aircraft Analytic Securing and Positioning Algorithms

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMS 502, CG(X) Program Office, ACAT 1

 

OBJECTIVE:  Develop and demonstrate innovative algorithms that will provide the ability to analyze aircraft, ship, and environmental conditions to determine loads imparted on aircraft structure, securing equipment and traverse system components, as a function of aircraft limits associated with Dynamic Interface (DI) test and/or operational conditions.  These advanced algorithms will aid in the determination of the optimal aircraft tie-down/securing-chain pattern configurations to enable the safe securing of aircraft on the flight deck of naval and commercial vessels in all environmental and operational conditions.

 

DESCRIPTION: The ability of an aircraft to remain on deck, in a controlled or restrained condition, depends on many factors such as ship motion, environmental conditions, as well as the size, shape, weight, configuration and operating condition of the aircraft.  Current analysis tools used to determine aircraft securing, traversing and landing loads are not able to support dynamic interface flight operations.  Current models that focus on helicopter/ship flight deck analysis include the Curtis Wright Controls Maritime Division Dynaface® simulation software and the Mechanical Dynamics, Inc. ADAMS® program.  Dynaface is a special purpose 15 DOF model and ADAMS is based on non-linear dynamics and solves the equations of motion of complex systems.  Although these programs can be used to calculate static loads, they are not able to account for helicopter rotor system aerodynamics or dynamic forces associated with rotor operations.

 

Currently, aircraft manufacturers provide both naval and commercial end-users with tie-down/securing-chain patterns that are solely based on structural strength of the aircraft.  Due to competing considerations associated with ship design process, these recommended patterns cannot always be duplicated in the design of the flight deck or applied during the construction and operation of an air capable ship.  The currently available analytical software tools (as discussed above) do not take into consideration all necessary design factors when predicting loads on the aircraft, securing equipment or traverse system components.  Additionally, chain-interference is caused when new or existing aircraft mission equipment requires a divergence from the contractor furnished tie-down patterns.  As a result, aircraft are being secured with unknown loads on securing equipment/traverse system components and aircraft structures.  The current solution to the uncertainties associated with unknown loads is to compensate by reducing the operational capability by reducing the total aircraft weight (i.e. fuel load, or payload) and/or restricting environmental conditions or sea states in which air capable ships may operate aircraft.  To date, an analytic capability has not been developed that is sophisticated enough to enable the incorporation of multi-design factor variables, including aircraft rotor operations, to determine the optimal aircraft tie-down/securing-chain pattern configurations.

 

This topic seeks innovative and alternative approaches to the development of advanced algorithms that will improve the ability to analyze the dynamics involved in aircraft securing by examining not only aircraft type and configuration (including fuel load and payload), but condition of operation, ship class, tie down configuration, ship motion and environmental conditions.  The key challenge to DI modeling is being able to include all factors in the problem space.  DI flight operations entails helicopter flight dynamics and trajectory, influence of ship air-wake and atmospheric turbulence, hydrodynamics of sea states, other human factors associated with ship deck crew, and influence of other environmental factors (i.e., temporal, weather conditions, etc.).  For the sake of demonstrating feasibility, proposers are encouraged to utilize aircraft data for the Multi-mission Helicopter MH-60R (references 6 and 7).  Ship motion data should be obtained from modeling and simulation from the Arleigh Burke Class Destroyer (DDG 51) during the Phase II prototype demonstration phase.  Once feasibility has been demonstrated, aircraft and ship specific data will be furnished by the Government POC identified for this topic.  Utilizing data from the aircraft, ship and environment, the proposed algorithms are expected to be able to determine the loads sustained by existing aircraft/ship securing and traversing equipment, whether aircraft is static or operating rotor blades.  The proposed algorithms shall also identify optimum locations for securing points on the flight deck, identify impacts of altering securing point locations and improve the capability to identify helicopter-traversing envelopes.  Approaches should be designed using Open Architecture (OA) design principles to the maximum extent practicable to be able to interface with, transfer and receive data from other OA designed tools (e.g. Leading Edge Architecture for Prototyping Systems (LEAPS) design software, etc.) as well shipboard specific data multiplexing systems.

 

Phase I:  Demonstrate the feasibility of the development of innovative and alternative approaches to aid in the determination of optimal aircraft tie-down/securing-chain pattern configurations to enable the safe securing of aircraft on the flight deck of naval and commercial vessels in all environmental and operational conditions. Establish performance goals and provide a Phase II development approach and schedule that contains discrete milestones for product development.

 

Phase II:  Develop, demonstrate and fabricate a prototype as identified in Phase I. In a laboratory environment, demonstrate that the prototype product meets the performance goals established during Phase I.  Provide a detailed plan for software certification, validation, and method of implementation into a future aircraft/ship test and/or design environment.  Prepare cost estimates, logistics data packages, and interface documents for use in both forward fit and retrofit ship programs.

 

Phase III: Utilizing the technology developed during Phase I and II, work with Navy and industry to certify and implement for use on existing and future naval and commercial shipbuilding programs, including adapting the prototype to be able to address multi-air assets.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL:  The advanced securing and positioning analytical tool can be utilized to improve the analysis of commercial cruise ships and other commercial air capable ships.  The technology can also be used to support tie-down requirements for commercial helicopters and other equipment on offshore oilrigs. The technology could also be adapted to support the securing and tie-down of cargo and commercial freight containers

 

KEYWORDS: tie downs; helicopter; ship integration; ship design; aviation; algorithms

 

 

 

N102-152                              TITLE: Near Field Passive Tracking

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Under Sea Warfare Decision Support Systems (USW-DSS) ACAT II

 

OBJECTIVE: Design and Develop an automated passive only target tracking system for a sparse field of low cost directional passive sonar sensors.

 

DESCRIPTION: Passive sonobuoys support the covert detection, classification, localization, and attack of a submarine through the detection of the narrowband, broadband and transient sounds that are emitted from even the quietest, modern submarine.  However, the implementation of target tracking with passive sensors has proven resistant to automation, significantly lagging progress achieved with other types of sensors. This lack of automation translates directly to shipboard extended manning requirements, heightened operator workload, and diminished operator functional efficacy. Furthermore, Ad-hoc, fractional solutions to the passive near-field tracking problem suffer from a common set of systemic shortcomings: mathematical modeling of the data measured at the sensors, handling non-linearity of the problem (nearfield curvature effects), and applying appropriate optimal estimation.  

 

Under this topic, an approach will be developed that addresses the specific technical problem of automated near field directional buoy tracking.  An effective approach must consider the following: physical modeling and error modeling of sensors and targets, choice of appropriate optimal estimation algorithms, and metrics based testing.  Develop processing concepts and proposed algorithms to automate localization and tracking of multiple surface and sub-surface contacts in a field of passive sonobuoy sensors.  The proposed approach must handle a mix of loud contacts that produce concurrent sonobuoy detections and quiet contacts that are detected intermittently by a single sensor.  Model results must demonstrate how the proposed algorithms will address the sensor positions and measurement limitations of passive sonobuoys.  Important performance metrics to be addressed include:  (a) contact scene completeness - the percentage of true contacts that are contained in the set of automated track solutions,  (b) number of false tracks produced by the automation that are unrelated to true contacts, (c) accuracy or mis-distance of localization and track solutions, (d) containment - the percentage of true contacts that are contained in the set of automated track solution areas of uncertainty. Innovation will be required to assure the eventual algorithms address the near field tracking problem.

 

PHASE I: Specify a set of metrics to act as the basis for selecting estimation algorithms.  Conduct research and development that will lead to the development of  unique optimal estimation algorithms. Conduct analyses of the algorithms to determine at least two optimal estimation algorithms for testing that are well suited to the near field tracking problem.

 

PHASE II: Complete development initiated in phase I.  Develop a prototype automated sonobuoy field processor utilizing the algorithms validated in phase I.  Process recoded sonobuoy field acoustic data to demonstrate algorithm performance.  Compute performance metrics for completeness, false tracks, localization tracking accuracy, and containment with recorded track data inputs.

 

PHASE III: Finalize development of  the Phase II prototype and participate in the transition efforts to a Navy system. Complete metrics based test suite, and optimize performance of baseline algorithms.  Bring product up to best commercial practices for function, stability and maintainability.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Developed technology will be useful in passive commercial automated surveillance systems and automated intrusion detection.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Kalman, R.E. (1960). "A new approach to linear filtering and prediction problems". Journal of Basic Engineering 82 (1): 35–45.

 

2. Kalman, R.E.; Bucy, R.S. (1961). New Results in Linear Filtering and Prediction Theory.

 

3. Alan V. Oppenheim, Ronald W. Schafer, John R. Buck : Discrete-Time Signal Processing, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-754920-2

 

4. Design and Analysis of Modern Tracking Systems, 1999, S. Blackman, R. Popoli, Artech House, ISBN 1580530060

 

KEYWORDS: Passive Sonobuoy Processing; Near Field Tracking; Non-Linear Tracking; Automation; Linear Filtering; Sensor Modeling

 

 

 

N102-153                              TITLE: Innovative materials/manufacturing for a prototype 600-1000VDC DC/DC

Converter for Shipboard Radar

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes, Sensors, Electronics

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: NA, IWS 2.0 will transition technology into developing high power radars.

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this topic is to develop a prototype, high efficiency, high power density, low noise, 2.5KW DC/DC converter for insertion into developing Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) systems.  Future Navy Active Electronically Steered Array (AESA) radar systems will demand higher peak and average power levels requiring development of high power density, isolated DC/DC converters for pulsed current loads.  This effort will require research and development of advanced materials, technologies, and manufacturing processes that will provide reliable, high performance power conversion while minimizing cost, weight, volume, and thermal management infrastructure.

 

DESCRIPTION: This topic seeks an advanced DC/DC converter design compatible with Transmit/Receive Modules utilized in Navy AESA radar systems and compatible with shipboard power requirements.  The power systems within AESA radar systems consume significant power, space and thermal management resources.  The power converters are designed to minimize cost, volume, thermal management infrastructure while maximizing efficiency, power density, and electrical performance. Goals for this prototype 2.5KW DC/DC converter will be 650 volt input, 28V output, efficiency greater than 90 percent%, power density greater than 200W per cubic inch, output regulation less than 0.1 percent, output ripple less than 0.25 percent, output stored energy less than 1 joule, and response time less than 10 microseconds, settling time less than 10 microseconds, overshoot less than 4 percent, output voltage droop less than .5 percent, and baseplate temperature typically at 50C. Key areas of interest are innovative designs for low loss switching topologies, low loss magnetic components, high common-mode isolation, advanced control loops, power factor correction, and enhanced thermal performance.

 

Power converters are a key enabling technology for fielding reliable and cost effective future AMDRs.  The prototype converter within this topic shall support developing AMDR radars in terms of system performance and component reliability.  Testing of the power converters will be conducted in a manner consistent with the operational requirements for the T/R modules (i.e. pulsed load conditions).  Additionally testing should include a 1000-Hr life test and other long term life tests performed to demonstrate power supply maturity.

 

PHASE I: Identify, model, and develop an innovative converter design incorporating materials, technologies and manufacturing processes that significantly improve performance and reliability.

               

PHASE II: Using the design in Phase I and any improvements in materials, technologies, and manufacturing processes developed in this phase, build and test a prototype DC/DC converter focusing on a Navy transition. The prototype design, materials, and processes developed will address the issues described in the description of this topic (e.g., performance, cost, size, weight, etc.)

               

PHASE III: The Small Business will team with the Navy to transition the phase II developed DC/DC converter design into first articles and pilot production for integration into a Navy systems.

               

Private Sector Commercial Potential/Dual-Use Applications: Reliable, high performance DC/DC converters are needed to support a number of emerging applications within the military and industry.

               

               

REFERENCES:

1. NAVMAT P-4855-1A Navy Power Supply Reliability, Design and Manufacturing Guidelines, 1989.

 

2. NAVSO P-3641A More Power For The Dollar, 1999.

 

3. Next Generation Integrated Power Systems (NGIPS) Roadmap:

https://www.neco.navy.mil/synopsis_file/N00024NGIPS_Technology_Dev_Roadmap_final_Distro_A.pdf

 

KEYWORDS: Power,Converter,Radar,EW,AESA,AMDR, DC

 

 

 

N102-154                              TITLE: Collaborative Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Threat Assessment

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Sensors, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Under Sea Warfare Decision Support Systems (USW-DSS) ACAT II

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: This project will require the joint application of three levels of fusion (I. contact association, II. situational assessment, III. threat assessment) in a single adaptive framework, where an uncertain contact picture at the entity level can be refined by relational inferencing across all fusion levels simultaneously.

 

DESCRIPTION: Current systems require Navy watchstanders to manually interpret the spatial and temporal relationships among entities on the tactical picture, infer the intentions of all the contacts in the data space, and assess the threat that each contact poses to strike group platforms. Multi-Level Fusion is being performed by the watch-stander manually and sequentially.  Current automated fusion algorithms are entity level algorithms that do not exploit feature measurement, classification clues, negative information, tactical events and entity relationship clues that are available from detecting sensors.  Algorithms are desired that exploit these clues to extend and clarify the tactical picture.  Successful technology will focus the strike-group ASW commander's attention on contacts of highest threat potential and reduce the time to make threat contact engagement decisions.

 

PHASE I: Formulate a concept and algorithmic approach that clarifies uncertain contact pictures using available situational and threat-specific information as a multi-level fusion application.  This should be framed as an unclassified multi-sensor, multi-location surveillance problem (e.g. port security)

 

PHASE II: Develop an automated algorithm that can be tested in a system prototype. The prototype shall work with ambiguous cross-platform sensor tracks and classification feature attributes, either simulated or real. Assess prototype performance using government furnished multi-sensor, multi-platform data, either simulated (unclassified) or real (classified) at-sea ASW exercise.

 

PHASE III: Integrate the automated threat assessment processing capability into the Undersea Warfare Decision Support System product baseline. Demonstrate improved ASW engagement decision timeliness and accuracy in an at-sea operational environment.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Commercial applications of this SBIR technology include commercial and residential surveillance and security systems utilizing multiple sensor types (radar, video and infra-red) and multiple sensor locations. Automated threat assessment technologies from surface, land, or perimeter surveillance systems can potentially be used in this SBIR project.

 

REFERENCES:

1.Steinberg, A.N., Bowman, C.L. and White, Jr., F.E. "Revision to the JDL Data Fusion Model" Proc. 3rd NATO/IRIS Conf. Quebec City, Canada 1998

 

2. Hall, D.L., Llinas, J. "Handbook of Multi-Sensor Data Fusion", CRC Press 2001

 

3. Goodman, I.R., Nguyen, H.T. and Mahler, R. "New Mathematical Tools for Data Fusion", Artech House, Inc. Boston 1997

 

KEYWORDS: Data-fusion; Anti-Submarine Warfare; Multi-Sensor Fusion; Multi-level Fusion; Threat Assessment; Situational Assessment

 

 

 

N102-155                              TITLE: Towed Array Fishing Net Entanglement Prevention or Damage Reduction

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: SURVEILLANCE TOWED ARRAY SENSOR SYSTEM (Low Frequency Active) ACAT II

 

OBJECTIVE: Research and develop a method and/or apparatus to prevent or mitigate towed array system damage from fishing net and hook entanglement

 

DESCRIPTION: Fishing nets plague US Navy operating areas in the Pacific Fleet (PACFLT). They entangle Navy towed arrays, especially the twin-lined (TL -29A) array used by SURTASS.  Entanglements occur with little or no warning. The entangled array coupled with the constant tow of the vessel causes enormous stress on the towed array and cable. The stress either snaps the array and/or significantly damages individual modules.

The costs of net entanglements are monetarily significant, impact mission critical operations, and reduce PACFLT ASW readiness. Disentanglement operations temporarily halt operations with similar consequences.

 

The Navy is committed to lessening the likelihood of net entanglements. This topic solicits innovative solutions beyond the current state of the art that improve array survivability.

 

Current solutions consist of the following. (a) SURTASS Headline and Roll Control System (SHARC), a rigid system between the two arrays that allows the system to potentially “fly” over the nets rather than collapse in them (as paravanes did).  However, the SHARC system can act as a net collector. The system has been useful in preventing collapse of the arrays (and further more expensive damage) but still collects nets and often can “push” fishing nets further down the array.  ( b) Preventative tools that measure spikes in tension.  The tensiometer that is currently in use measures tension in the array, which is triggered by an entanglement that has already occurred.  This device helps to prevent further damage caused by entanglement by alerting the crew to stop the ship and retrieve the array to remove nets.  (c)Modifications to smooth array hard points, referred to as the y-joint modification, consist of a hard plastic shell (over the tow cable y-joint). It  provides a smooth surface (over a once blunt design) and lets the nets glide over this area.  However, there are still areas of the array that are prone to net entanglements (that now occur further down the array). (d)Hardware and sensors are used to locate and recover lost arrays, but that goal is not within the scope of this topic. All of these items provide help in dealing with net entanglements and can minimize impact but none provide a solution to prevent entanglement from occurring. 

 

There is still no known solution to prevent entanglements. Using the technology listed above, the Navy has attempted to “steer” the net entanglements and damage to less costly, less critical parts of the array.  However, net entanglements still occur and the damage often leads to both potential array loss and/or the array having to be removed from the ship to be repaired. 

 

Offerors are asked to research, develop and demonstrate new solutions to the stated problem. Solutions may include location detection (of nets), preventative devices, safe cutting devices, avoidance devices and/or damage mitigation schemes.

 

PHASE I: Conduct a feasibility study of how the proposed solution would prevent net entanglements and reduce damage or loss. The feasibility of the proposed solution should be visually supported by a basic working model, CAD drawings at the conceptual level, or simulation. Assess and analyze the remaining research and development required to implement the proposed solution. Clearly identify how the analysis and study address the current Navy’s towed array system and system requirements.

 

PHASE II: Implement the Phase I design in an Engineering Development Model (EDM) and test the EDM in a realistic environment, which might include lake or basin testing.  Incorporate lessons learned from these tests into a full system design.  Complete some small tests or models to demonstrate that the lessons learned were incorporated into the system.

 

PHASE III: Fabricate a production representative towed array system for lake and/or at-sea testing onboard a SURTASS vessel. Successful completion of this waterborne testing will enable the integration of the net mitigation solution into the Navy’s towed array systems.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Net mitigation applications can have use in any towed array application including the seismic oil exploration industry. In addition any research attained throughout this process may be beneficial to any commercial or environmental agencies/sectors concerned with fishing net entanglement.

 

REFERENCES:

Patents cited represent different approaches and are not to be taken as endorsements of the patent or the patented approach.

1. “Adaptive Methods Develops SHARC Tow System” http://www.adaptivemethods.com/news/detail.php?news_id=10

 

2. “Gel-Filled Seismic Streamer Cable” http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6879546.html

 

3. “Lateral Force Device for Underwater Array” http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/5443027/description.html

 

4. “Thin-Line Towed Array Force Measurement Apparatus and Method” http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/6253627/description.html

5. TL-29A towed array drawing. (Uploaded in SITIS 6/2/10.)

6. Photos of fishing net entanglements, 5 photos. (Uploaded in SITIS 6/2/10.)

 

KEYWORDS: entanglement avoidance; towed arrays; SURTASS; fishing nets; array damage mitigation; array damage avoidance

 

 

 

N102-156                              TITLE: Integrity and Authentication of Real-Time Data in Navy Combat Systems

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Future Navy Combat System, Advanced Capability Build (ACB) 14/16/18

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop the capability to authenticate, authorize, encrypt, key manage and audit publishers and subscribers in a real-time deadline scheduled pub/sub software environment on a per middleware message basis.  We have a need for ensuring the producers and consumers of information used within a Navy surface combat system can be authenticated and trusted while preserving system performance requirements and data pedigree.

 

DESCRIPTION: In a publish/subscribe environment, robust capabilities are needed to (1) assure internal information pedigree, (2) preclude external data tampering/compromise and (3) ensure the producers and consumers of information can be authenticated and trusted.

 

Information assurance objectives include maintaining non-repudiation and data integrity for machine-to-machine, people-to-machine, and people-to-people data exchanges, such that all data producers and consumers are trusted. An open architecture methodology and information assurance design is needed to assure that the data has reached its intended recipient without data corruption.  The desired capabilities should include a means to provide an auditable chain of custody for the data as it traverses data producers and consumers.  This capability should include sender and receiver authentication, data integrity, and encryption. All features should be available in the pub/sub environment and be done on a per message/topic basis. There currently is not a capability to accomplish this in a real-time deadline scheduled environment. Current technologies only provide this capability for all messages and only in a point-to-point environment where both sender and receiver know each other and have a pre-existing trust model implemented. In a pub/sub environment, the sender is agnostic to the receiver and therefore no pre-existing trust models can be established. This SBIR needs to address this gap in capability in a true pub/sub environment.

 

These new capabilities must not adversely impact the existing system performance and real-time data delivery Quality of Service (QoS) guarantees of a distributed combat system, nor diminish the functionality of the system.  It therefore is crucial that the developed technologies be lightweight and low-overhead in terms of processor, memory and network usage.

 

PHASE I: Analyze problem space, identify or define a set of specific information assurance technologies, develop initial concept design and deliver a plan of action for development of the set technologies that meet the need for real-time data provenance.

 

PHASE II: Develop, test and integrate the technologies identified in Phase I with a representative real-time surface Navy software system.  Analyze performance impact of the developed technology.

 

PHASE III: Develop a set of products based on the work completed in Phase I and II and participate in their transition into Navy systems. These products should be standards based.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The developed technology will have applications to any distributed computing software where it is important to establish trust between data producer and data consumer.  This commercial dual-use will mitigate identity theft and enhance electronic banking and commerce.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Navy Open Architecture Computing Environment Design Guidance, August 23, 2004; http://www.nswc.navy.mil/TIE/OACE/docs/OACE_Design_Guidance_v1dot0_final.pdf

 

2. DDS: Data-Distribution Service for Real-Time Systems specification, version 1.2, http://www.omg.org/technology/documents/formal/data_distribution.htm

 

3. A New SOA Data-Provenance Framework; Tsai W.T. et al., Eight International Symposium on Autonomous Decentralized Systems (ISADS’07), IEEE 2007

 

4. “Towards Low Overhead Provenance Tracking in Near Real-Time Stream Filtering,” Vijayakumar, N.N. and Plale, B., Provenance and Annotation of Data, 46-54, Springer 2006

 

KEYWORDS: data distribution, information assurance, provenance, real-time

 

 

 

N102-157                              TITLE: Light High-Speed Amphibious Vehicle

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Operational Logistics Integration Program

 

OBJECTIVE: To develop robust solutions to the hydrodynamic drag issues associated with high-speed amphibious vehicles in a variety of size classes.

 

DESCRIPTION:  Amphibious vehicles have historically offered a unique ability to cross the surf line and move cargo inland on a single platform, but have always had disadvantages including low water speed and limited cargo capacity. Advances in technology since the 1960s (when the last major wheeled cargo carrying amphibian series was designed), however, appear to show promise in addressing some of the technical issues that have historically limited performance of an amphibian.

 

The key limiting factor for water performance has been the hydrodynamic drag associated with the land mode drive train of the vehicle. Legacy designs such as the LARC series and the familiar DUKW have accepted this drag and made incremental concessions to boat-like design for operation as displacement vessels. Large amphibious demonstrators have had to accept a great deal of design complexity (e.g. retractable hydrofoils, variable geometry surfaces, redundant or extremely large power plants) to attain high water speeds. Small high-speed demonstrators have been more successful in maintaining a more nearly automotive design, but have very limited carrying capacities.

 

This project seeks innovative technological solutions to mitigate the adverse water mode performance effects of the land mode drive train in an amphibious vehicle. Potential approaches include, but are not limited to, retraction mechanisms, faired covers, and controlled separation of flows. Special consideration should be paid to minimizing the overall craft impact of the selected technology, both in terms of space and weight required and in terms of preparation and time required to shift between land and water operating modes. Scalability to vehicle sizes capable of carrying an operationally relevant cargo (e.g. multiple fully equipped personnel, palletized supplies) is a necessity.

 

PHASE I: Complete the required initial research to demonstrate that enhanced capabilities are achievable with the proposed technology or concept. Prepare a concise study showing how the new technology will achieve high water speeds and mode conversion in the context of a mid-size amphibious vehicle. Approximate Desired Characteristics: road legal, water speed 20+ kts, road speed 45+ mph, cargo capacity of at least one short ton, sufficient off-road capability to exit an unimproved beach.

 

PHASE II: Construct a sub-scale development model of the selected technology and conduct appropriate preliminary tests to measure performance and identify a development path to full capability.

 

PHASE III: Construct or convert a full scale demonstration vehicle suitable for test & evaluation by the transition sponsor.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR APPLICATIONS: Emergency responders and civilian search and rescue organizations might find the amphibious capability useful for a number of missions. Additionally, a large number of mid-size amphibians are in use as tourist and pleasure craft throughout the world. These craft are between 45 and 60 years old, and long out of production. Modern high performance amphibious craft could find a civilian market in this industry.

 

REFERENCES:

1. “Wheeled Amphibians” Army Material Command Design Handbook AMCP 706-350, 1971.

 

2. United States Coast Guard Navigation and Inspection Circular No. 1-01 Inspection of Passenger Carrying Amphibious Vehicles. USCG COMDTPUB P16700.4 NVIC 1-01

 

3. Friedman, Norman J. U.S.  Amphibious Ships and Craft: An Illustrated Design History. Naval Institute Press, 2002.

 

KEYWORDS: Amphibious Vehicles, Amphibians, Small Craft, Hydrodynamics, Drag Reduction, Maritime Mobility

 

 

 

N102-158                              TITLE: Intelligent Agents for ASW Threat Prosecution

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Under Sea Warfare Decision Support Systems (USW-DSS) ACAT II

 

OBJECTIVE:  This topic seeks to develop and adapt a decision process model to filter and aggregate contacts, and declutter displays in contact dense environments.  The goal is to employ the decision process model to provide different tactical renderings of the data based upon common underlying features in the state data linked to entity tracks. The relevant tactical feature sets will be provided to as Government Furnished Information.

 

DESCRIPTION:  The decision environment in which the Anti Submarine Warfare Commander (ASWC)must operate during threat prosecution is characterized by severe time pressure, complex, multi-component decision tasks, rapidly evolving and changing information.  The data on which ASWC threat prosecution decisions are based are presented in an automated, information dense ASW tactical master plot that displays all acoustic contacts from multiple platforms and multiple sensors across the strike group.  This tactical master plot is currently simplified for decision making purposes by visual inspection.

 

A flexible decision process model is sought that decomposes track data into simplified renderings that support ASW contact prosecution workflow.  Unclassified state data and operationally important features will be provided as GFI during Phase I.  The key metric to be used in evaluating the effectiveness of the approach will be reduction in the detect to engage timeline.

 

PHASE I:  Design a decision process model that can be applied to tracker state data to declutter contact dense displays.  Demonstrate the performance of this model for a simple test case (defined at program kickoff)

 

PHASE II: Build an automated prototype.  Build a full library of filters and alerts, sufficient to improve ASWC effectiveness in assigning resources and prosecuting contacts. The number of contacts he is able to manage/prosecute effectively should increase, and the training required to do the job effectively should decrease, resulting in an overall increase in productivity and reduction in detect to engage timeline. 

 

PHASE III: Transition the Intelligent Agent to the Carrier and to USW Decision Support platforms.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  This product is appropriate for all Army, Navy, and Airforce automated scene managment applications.  There is potential to provide scene management tools for managing high density shipping traffic, as well as for resolving ambiguity in air traffic control data.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Moray, N., Editor "History and Scope of human factors" September 2005

 

2. Kirlik, A., Editor "Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction" Oxford University Press 2006

 

3. Brunswik, E. "The conceptual framework of psychology" University of Chicago Press 1952

 

KEYWORDS: Decision Process Model; Anti Submarine Warfare; Cognitive Engineering; Automation; Battlespace Management; Tracking

 

 

 

N102-159                              TITLE: Consolidated Apertures with Co-site Interference Reduction in the Frequency

Range 2 to 30 MHz

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMS 502, CGX Program, ACAT 1

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop an innovative approach to enable the consolidation of multiple transmit and receive signals in the 2 to 30 MHz frequency range onto two transmit and one receive antennas.

 

DESCRIPTION: The topside of Navy ships is crowded and the space available for new antennas, systems and capabilities is limited by the number of existing topside systems.  Co-site effects from new high-power phased array radars only compound this problem due to the required amount of space, weight, and power.  Using dedicated antennas for each system also increases the likelihood of co-site interference between RF systems.  Ultimately the lack of available topside real estate unacceptably constrains the performance of new systems.  Additionally, there is a growing need for increased communications capabilities on Navy combatants.  For new ships, and upgrades to existing ships, these increased communications capabilities combined with more stringent performance requirements drive a need for technology approaches that will increase throughput while reducing the number of antennas.  One major technical challenge for topside systems is the requirement to operate in the presence of multiple, high-power, RF transmitters.  This challenge is further complicated by the need to consolidate multiple signals onto fewer antennas to meet the communications requirements in the space available.

 

This topic seeks to meet these challenges by exploring the development of innovative new approaches for antenna consolidation and integrated co-site interference mitigation techniques.  This need is especially acute in the 2 to 30 MHz (HF) range.  The wavelengths in this frequency range are comparable to the dimensions of the ship; thus, spatial isolation between transmit and receive antennas is limited.  Legacy systems that combine multiple signals onto a few antennas typically have significant insertion loss. For example, legacy systems when combining up to 16 signals have insertion losses no less than 12 dB per signal.  Additionally, these legacy systems typically do not use Automatic Link Establishment (ALE) to select the optimum frequency for transmission [Reference 1]. The figures of merit for any proposed technology should include: ability to receive a signal while transmitting many high-power signals, the ability to change frequency rapidly to accommodate environmental change common to HF communications, and the reduction of insertion losses.  Any technology solutions that can meet these goals should be considered. Examples of technology that have proven successful in the 30 to 400 MHz frequency range include comb filtration with linear combining and active feedback transmit signal cancellation [References 2, 3, and 4].

 

Representative and relational data will be provided, as needed, for this project during Phase II. All information provided and generated as a result of this effort will be unclassified.

 

PHASE I: Demonstrate the feasibility of an approach that will enable the consolidation of 2-30 MHz antennas with integrated co-site interference mitigation. Establish performance goals of the approach.  Provide a Phase II development approach and schedule that contains discrete milestones for product development.     

 

PHASE II: Develop, demonstrate and fabricate a prototype as identified in Phase I. Using a 16-channel high power HF transmission system, in a laboratory environment demonstrate the ability to consolidate signals without significant loss of performance and the ability of the technology to reduce the effects of co-site interference.  Demonstrate that the prototype meets the performance goals established in Phase I. Develop a cost benefit analysis and a Phase III installation, testing, and validation plan.

 

PHASE III: Working with government and industry, develop prototypes of final products identified in Phase II and perform tests to validate performance. Evaluations should be conducted on a shipboard test platform or at a representative Land Based Test Facility as appropriate and should demonstrate the ability to consolidate signals without significant loss of performance and the ability of the technology to reduce the effects of co-site interference.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Hand held radio manufacturers are in the market for technology that can permit more signals to be transmitted and received simultaneously through existing antennas.

 

REFERENCES:

1. John C. Kim and Eugen I. Muehldorf, Naval Shipboard Communications Systems, Prentice Hall, 1995.

 

2. Michael A. Maiuzzo, Shing T. Li, John W. Rockway, James H. Schukantz, and Daniel W. Tam, “Comb Linear Amplifier Combiner (CLAC),” Patent 6,211,732 Issued 3 April 2001.

 

3. Michael A. Maiuzzo, Shing T. Li, John W. Rockway, James H. Schukantz, and Daniel W. Tam, “Comb Linear Combiner for Frequency-Hopped Communications,” Patent 6,549,560 Issued 15 April 2003.

 

4. Richard Adams, Ted Harwood, Mike Maiuzzo, “An Innovative Signal Distribution System that Allows EMI Free Communications for Navy Ships,” presented at 2008 MILCOM conference.

 

KEYWORDS: HF Communications; antenna combiner; automatic link establishment; co-channel isolation; passive intermodulation; co-site interference

 

 

 

N102-160                              TITLE: Low Maintenance, Low Cost Valves

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PEO Aircraft Carriers, ACAT IV

 

OBJECTIVE: To develop a family of valves which require substantially less maintenance than current valves, but have comparable outside dimensions and comparable pressure/flow performance characteristics as typical vales equipped with standard gland packing at a low cost.  The maintenance performance objective is essentially zero maintenance to the valve stem or gland seal for seven years, with the exception of an annual visual inspection.  For purposes of discussion, the valve would be fully stroked twice daily, then left half open.  The valves must be suitable for installation aboard warships, thus entailing shock, vibration, EMI and fire hazard specifications.

 

DESCRIPTION: Thousands of valves operate aboard a typical warship, each requiring maintenance to ensure smooth and full cycling capability, as well as to prevent leaking by.  The number of valves on a warship is higher than on commercial ships, due to redundant piping and cross-connecting systems for quick service restoration in the event of battle damage. The man hours associated with valve maintenance is considerable, and often requires system outages to remove and replace the gland packing, remove verdigris, and hone and polish the valve stem to near-new condition.  This can easily take one man-hour for a single half-inch valve.  In most valves, small leaks around the stem develop over time, as there are some clearances between the stem and the gland packing to allow movement around the stem.  Mildly corrosive fluids such as seawater can eat at the surface of the valve stem, making it rougher and less likely to seal.  Gritty contaminants in the fluid, or adhering to the valve stem, may be drawn in to the interstitial space and act abrasively, thus degrading the gland packing and valve stem even further.

 

A new design of valves would ideally obviate the need for valve stem maintenance while simultaneously reducing cost of parts, associated manhours, and increasing readiness.

 

PHASE I: Investigate concepts for development of a low cost, low maintenance valve that would allow low-speed (40RPM nominal) rotary valve actuation without substantially leaking and without requiring substantial maintenance for a saltwater or freshwater system.  Determine the salient factors that affect performance of the gland packing, and determine a way of meeting the above performance objectives.  Compare the technical alternatives for feasibility.  Report on all findings, making recommendations as to the most promising and feasible technical approaches to benefit from further development.

 

PHASE II: Design brass-board valves which incorporate advanced technology, and demonstrate their effectiveness in reducing valve maintenance and reducing cost.  As time limitations may prohibit the full evaluation of wear over the course of a seven year lifecycle, a special test jig is to be designed and used to simulate several years of stoking, corrosion, vibration, contamination, and shipboard installation, using tribology theory and engineering judgment.  After the test period, the brass-board valves will be disassembled and inspected to evaluate wear.  Make changes as may be indicated by the results of the test, and test a revised valve using the same test jig, and inspect it for wear.  Presuming the effort is successful, make an estimate of lifecycle costs of using the new valves, as compared to standard valves.  Develop the logistics support package including provisioning technical documentation, drawings, operating instructions, installation, training and maintenance procedures as necessary.

 

PHASE III: Conduct full-scale manufacturing, Fleet introduction and fielding, and computer based training as necessary.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Commercial factories, commercial naval vessels, industrial environments.

 

REFERENCES:

1. NSTM 505- Piping Systems

 

2. Joint Fleet Forces Manual- Revision B (COMFLTFORCOMINST 4790.3)

 

3. Standard Navy Valve Technical Manual  (NAVSEA   0948-LP- 012-5000)

 

KEYWORDS: Reduced maintenance, valve, leakage, seawater, valve stem, fire main, cooling water, reduced cost

 

 

 

N102-161                              TITLE: Flexible Electronic Cooling Water (ECW) Piping Interfaces

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMS 502, CGX Program, ACAT 1

 

OBJECTIVE: Explore the development of alternatives to traditional ECW piping system interfaces through the application of novel interface concepts and the use of advanced material solutions to minimize maintenance and life cycle costs, time required and level of effort associated with movement and rearrangement of these shipboard piping systems.

 

DESCRIPTION: A significant cost component of maintenance and life-cycle costs for hull, mechanical and electrical systems is the need for hot-work when a piece of equipment is moved or rearranged within a space onboard Navy ships.  When equipment is moved, associated piping is typically rerouted.  This requires new, welded or brazed pipe connections, the installation of new pipe hangers and the cutting, grinding and repainting associated with removal of the existing pipe hangers.  The overall process is both time consuming and can be expensive.  In addition, this work often requires a full Ship Alteration (SHIPALT), which includes a two year planning period, followed by a three to six month change-out and since it must be accomplished in a shipyard, the availability of the ship is directly affected. 

 

This topic seeks to explore the development of innovative, non-traditional concepts to enable flexibility in the installation, relocation or re-routing of ECW piping runs in an attempt to reduce labor and material costs typically associated with these types of changes.  Total escalated life-cycle cost of a conventional ECW System is estimated at over $4 Million.  Across multiple compartments within one ship and considering entire classes of ships, the cost savings could be significant.  Proposed concepts will be required to meet existing Navy shock qualifications for piping (see references).    Meeting these shock requirements represents the most significant challenge associated with designing a shipboard, flexible piping solution. 

 

Proposed concepts should eliminate the need for hot work (welding, brazing, cutting and grinding) while meeting all referenced shipboard standards and requirements (see references below).  In addition, concepts should eliminate the need for a SHIPALT by removing the need for hot work (welding, brazing, cutting and grinding) and causing minimal disruption to the ship.  The concepts should allow this work to be performed via Equipment Alteration (Machinery Alterations, Field Changes, etc), which do not require the extensive planning and change-out period associated with and are less expensive than SHIPALTs.  In addition, by performing piping change-outs via Equipment Alteration vice SHIPALTs, the ship’s availability is increased since it does not have to return to a shipyard for this work to be performed.  Proposed concepts should focus on electronic cooling water piping applications.  Current shipboard pipe sizes range from a 2 inch main to a ½ inch supply line.  The temperature range for this piping is from 40 to 105 degrees Fahrenheit and the pressure range is from 10 to 150 lb/sq. in.  If successful, there is a possibility that the proposed flexible piping solution could be used for potable water piping in the future.  

 

PHASE I: Demonstrate the feasibility of the development of innovative, non-traditional approaches to eliminate the need for welding and/or hot work and meet current Navy standards and requirements.  Establish performance goals of the approach.  Provide a Phase II development approach and schedule that contains discrete milestones for product development.

 

PHASE II: Develop a prototype of the proposed Phase I concept(s).  In a laboratory environment, validate the performance goals identified in Phase I.  Provide manpower, cost-savings and performance metrics.  Prepare an implementation and test plan that contains discrete milestones for product development for the purposes of obtaining necessary certifications for shipyard and/or manufacturing sector implementation.

 

PHASE III: Utilizing the concept(s) developed during Phase I and Phase II, work with Navy and industry to approve and certify the proposed concept for use in Navy applications and then transition this technology to existing and future surface combatant systems.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The commercial shipping industry may find the same cost reduction benefits in the use of these piping interfaces.

 

REFERENCES:

The following references are available through ASSIST (https://assist.daps.dla.mil/quicksearch/):

1. MIL-S-901: Grade “A” Shock Testing

 

2. MIL-STD-167-1: Mechanical Vibrations of Shipboard Equipment

 

3. MIL-STD-2142: Magnetic Silencing Characteristics

 

4. MIL-STD-1399-300: Interface Standard for Shipboard Systems, Electric Power Alternating Current (Metric)

 

5. MIL-STD-1310G: Navy Standard for Grounding

 

6. MIL-E-16400: General Specification for Electronic, Interior Communication and Navigation Equipment, Naval Ship and Shore

 

7. MIL-W-21965: General Specification for Water Cooling of Shipboard Electronic Equipment

 

8. MIL-H-24520: Hose and Hose Assembly for Water Cooling of Electronic Equipment

 

9. MIL-STD-438: Schedule of Piping, Valves, Fittings and Associated Piping Components for Submarine Service

 

10. MIL-STD-777: Schedule of Piping Valves, Fittings and Associated Piping Components for Surface Ships

 

11. Removed at the request of TPOC (4/26/10)

 

12. Removed at the request of TPOC (4/26/10)

 

13. Removed at the request of TPOC (4/26/10)

 

14. Removed at the request of TPOC (4/26/10)

 

KEYWORDS: electronic cooling water systems; piping; fittings; interfaces; arrangements; open systems;

 

 

 

N102-162                              TITLE: Shipboard Clothes Dryers, “Green Technology”

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles

 

OBJECTIVE:  Develop a 50-pound (dry weight) capacity, electrically-heated tumbler-dryer, compatible for operations within a U.S. Navy shipboard laundering environment, which does not require external exhausting and venting of air. 

 

DESCRIPTION: The Navy currently outfits ships with tumbler-dryers built to the A-A-59364 CID standard (superseding MIL-T-23480A).  This standard includes requirements for exhaust, ducting and lint box/screen integration which might be eliminated by introducing newer, more energy efficient, clothes drying technology.

 

Existing technology in drying garments on board ship involves constantly drawing in air from the atmosphere surrounding the dryer, heating the air by steam or electrical means, forcing the heated air through a rotating basket, and exhausting this moisture and lint laden air into ventilation ductwork.  This equates to 750cfm air displacement, and 54 amps per phase, for each 50-lb dryer in the laundry.  Ships laundry spaces are typically located low in the ship, resulting in the need for lengthy exhaust ducting and fans to expel dryer exhaust overboard. 

 

Historically, laundry dryer lint fires have been a major source of shipboard fires.  The use of hot air (~180F) results in a significant amount of lint production during the drying cycles.  Inevitably, some of this lint is drawn into the ventilation duct work.  A ships laundry is an inherently humid environment, and ships are spending deployments in humid geographical areas of the world.  Heat, humidity and lengthy runs of ventilation create a high probability for fire.

 

The desire is to design a 50-lb capacity tumbler-dryer which would operate utilizing more energy efficient “green” technology that might preclude the need for high heat temperatures and exhausting this hot, lint-laden air through lengths of ventilation ductwork.  The use of new efficient technologies should reduce degradation of fabrics and result is a decrease in lint production.  Less lint means a lower probability for lint fires.  Technologies which could eliminate the need for external exhausting and venting of air overboard could allow the reclamation of limited volume on ship for use elsewhere.  The current requirement for dedicated dyer exhaust ducting demands considerable shipboard space (cubic volume of exhaust ventilation).  The elimination of dryer exhaust ventilation frees up this volume of space for other uses.  Less lint production and no dryer exhaust duct work means no lint buildup in dryer ventilation, reducing the fire potential and decreasing manpower expended to clean these dryer exhaust systems.

 

Any shipboard design would need to be of a modular construction.  This will allow the tumbler-dryers to be disassembled pier side and moved into the ship’s laundry space without the need for hull cuts or other large accesses.  All modular sections should be designed to fit through a standard 26” shipboard hatch/door. 

 

PHASE I:  Study engineering and manufacturing processes to determine drying technologies that would increase drying efficiency, decrease environmental impacts, and be suitable for installation and operation in a U.S. Navy shipboard laundry.  The equipment must be developed to meet shipboard (environmental) requirements, and current mechanical and electrical standards.  The ideal model would be able to be loaded aboard ship via normal personnel passageways and hatches. 

 

PHASE II:  Develop prototypes of selected dryer design for operational testing and evaluation at the production site, followed by shipboard trials which will be arranged by the Navy. 

PHASE III:  Follow up successful equipment evaluation by requesting Navy assistance for acquisition support, to facilitate Fleet equipment sales and potential (Navy/DoD) shore infrastructure installations.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL:  The new dryer design should serve as a catalyst for market entry as industry transitions to environmental and energy saving technology.  Assist with technical documentation (e.g., drawings and life cycle support plans) to have the new dryer added to the list of approved shipboard equipment.

 

REFERENCES:

 

1. Commercial Item Description A-A-59364 ; Tumbler-Dryer, Laundry, Steam and Electric (Naval Shipboard), 50-pound and 100-pound dry weight capacity.

 

2. Commercial Item Description (CID)A-A-59364, Tumbler-Dryer, Laundry, Steam, and Electric (Naval Shipboard), 7 pages. (Uploaded in SITIS 6/8/2010).

 

3. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Criteria Manual for Surface Ships of The United States Navy; NAVSEA0938-LP-018-0010.

 

KEYWORDS: Ventless, exhaust-free, ductless, heat exchange, closed cycle, dehumidification, tumbler-dryer, clothes dryer, shipboard laundry, modular

 

 

 

N102-163                              TITLE: High Strength, Optical Quality Spinel

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Naval Unmanned Combat Air System (NUCAS)  PMA-268

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Increase the mean mechanical strength of optical quality spinel for large windows to 300 MPa with a Weibull modulus of at least 6 to reduce the thickness and weight required for large-area applications.

 

DESCRIPTION: Of the three available durable midwave infrared sensor window materials, spinel has the widest transmission window and the lowest mechanical strength.  For applications such as reconnaissance, windows need to be as thin as possible to maximize transmission and minimize weight.  However, the thickness must be great enough to bear the required mechanical load.  The goal of this SBIR topic is to increase the strength of spinel to at least 300 MPa with a Weibull modulus of at least 6, while retaining the best possible optical quality.  The method must be scaleable to make windows with dimensions of at least 0.40 x 0.40 x 0.013 m.

 

PHASE I: Conduct coupon-level experiments to demonstrate a method to make optical quality spinel with a mean strength of at least 300 MP and Weibull modulus of at least 6, as measured in biaxial flexure with 38-mm-diameter x 2-mm-thick disks.  Methods used must be scaleable to eventually give windows with dimensions of at least 0.40 x 0.40 x 0.013 m.  Coupons should have not more than 0.5% total integrated forward optical scatter at 3.39 microns and should be free of obvious inclusions and defects and stress birefringence.

 

PHASE II: Optimize the mechanical strength of large spinel windows while retaining excellent optical quality.  Goals are a mean strength of at least 300 MPa with a Weibull modulus of at least 6.  Evaluate mechanical and optical properties with coupons cut out of 0.40 x 0.40 x 0.013 m plates.

 

PHASE III: Scale up for commercial production of 0.4 x 0.4 m or larger finished windows for Navy airborne reconnaissance platforms or a Navy ship such as the DDX-1000 destroyer.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: There is a potentially large market for strengthened spinel for bulletproof windows for armored vehicles

 

REFERENCES:

1. S. M. Sweeney, M. K. Brun, T. J. Yosenick, A. Kebbede, and M. Manoharan, “High Strength Transparent Spinel with Fine, Unimodal Grain Size,” Proceedings of SPIE. 2009, 7302, 73020G.

 

2.  J. L. Sepulveda, R. O. Llutfy, S. Chang, S. Ibrahim, and N. Traggis, “Advances in Spinel Ceramic Technology for large Windows and Domes,” Proceedings of SPIE. 2009, 7302, 73020E.

 

3.  J. R. Bashe and D. Hibbared, “Observations During the Fabrication of Spinel Optics,” Proceedings of SPIE. 2009, 7302, 73020C.

 

KEYWORDS: Spinel; Infrared Window; Transparent Ceramic; Mechanical Strength

 

 

 

N102-164                              TITLE: Large-Area, Monolithic Reconnaissance Window

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Naval Unmanned Combat Air System (NUCAS) PMA-268

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Scale up window technology to make large, strong, monolithic windows from sapphire, spinel, or aluminum oxynitride (ALON).

 

DESCRIPTION: There is a continuing need for durable, infrared-transmitting sensor windows with areas up to 0.8 x 0.8 meter for reconnaissance purposes.  The size of monolithic windows is presently limited by crystal growing equipment used to make sapphire, and by the availability of hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing equipment for spinel and ALON.  One approach to make large windows is by edge-bonding of small windows.  The mechanical strength of the bond and the ability to image through the bond are potential limitations of this approach.  An alternative approach is to scale up processes to make large, strong, monolithic windows.  Excellent optical and mechanical properties of small windows must be preserved in the large windows.

 

PHASE I: Identify and demonstrate key steps of a scaleable method to make optical quality, mechanically strong, monolithic sapphire, spinel, or ALON blank plates.  The method must have clear potential to be scaled up to at least 0.40 x 0.80 x 0.013 m and, preferably, 0.80 x 0.80 x 0.013 m panels.  Identify the major cost drivers for scaleup.  Devise a Phase II plan to make the maximum area window consistent with a Phase II budget.

 

PHASE II: Produce the maximum area window consistent with a Phase II budget.  Apply an “inspection polish” to the faces to demonstrate the absence of voids, bubbles, or inclusions and to demonstrate refractive index homogeneity and the absence of stress birefringence.  Use coupons cut from a large blank to measure transmittance and optical scatter and mechanical strength in biaxial flexure.  Identify a path to scale up to 0.80 x 0.80 x 0.013 m blanks.

 

PHASE III: Scale up for commercial production of 0.8 x 0.8 m finished windows.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: There is a large market for bulletproof windows for armored vehicles if cost per unit area can be decreased.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  J. Locher, C. Jones, H. Bates, and J. Rioux, "Characteristics of Thick (>12 mm) Class 225 EFG Sapphire Sheet for IR Window Applications," Proc. SPIE 2009, 7302, 730202.

 

2.  L. M. Goldman, R. Twedt, R. Forti, M. Smith, and S. A. Sastri, "Large-Area ALON Windows for Reconnaissance and Armor Applications," Proc. SPIE 2009, 7302, 730205.

 

3.  J. Sepulveda, R. O. Loutfy, S. Chang, and S. Ibrahim, "Advances in Spinel Ceramic Technology for large Windows and Domes," Proc. SPIE 2009, 7302, 73020E.

 

KEYWORDS: Sapphire; Spinel; Aluminum Oxynitride (ALON); Reconnaissance window; Infrared Window; Transparent Ceramic

 

 

 

N102-165                              TITLE: Optically Precise Conformal Sensor Window

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Naval Unmanned Combat Air System PMA-268

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Produce a durable, conformal midwave-infrared-transmitting window with a shape such as a toroid and lateral dimensions of 30 x 30 cm with surface figure accuracy of 1 micron.  The preferred material is spinel, but other materials with at least an equally wide infrared bandpass and similar erosion resistance will be considered.

 

DESCRIPTION: Future air vehicles will benefit from sensor windows that conform to the shape of the airframe.  The goal of this SBIR topic is to advance the state of the art of grinding, polishing, and measuring conformal shapes without rotational symmetry and made of hard materials.  Proposals may cover fabrication or metrology or both.  A fabrication-centered proposal must identify the available metrology that will be used to assess how well the fabricated part meets dimensional specifications.  An example of a possible window shape to be targeted for the end of Phase II would be a 30 x 30 cm toroid with a radius of curvature of 30 cm along one axis and 60 cm along the perpendicular axis.

 

PHASE I: Demonstrate key aspects of the proposed technology by making or measuring a toroid or other selected shape with lateral dimensions of 10 x 10 cm.  For fabrication, either spinel or another hard optical material can be selected in consultation with the Government.  Demonstrate that the part can be made with peak-to-valley surface shape accuracy within +/- 1 micron of the theoretical shape.

 

PHASE II: Scale up to make or measure a spinel toroid or other selected shape with lateral dimensions of 30 x 30 cm.  Demonstrate that the part can be made with peak-to-valley surface shape accuracy within +/- 0.2 micron of the theoretical shape over the entire clear aperture.

 

PHASE III: Implement commercial production of 50 x 50 cm or larger conformal windows suitable for high quality imaging sensors.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Conformal windows could be used for synthetic vision systems on commercial aircraft.  These windows could increase the pilot’s field of regard and might be used in locations that would not be suitable for flat windows.

 

REFERENCES:

1.  G. P. H. Gubbels, B. E. H. Venrooy, and R. Henselmans, "Accuracy of Freeform Manufacturing Processes," Proc. SPIE 2009, 7426, 742607.

 

2.  R. Henselmans, L. Cacace, G. Kramer, N. Rosielle, and M. Steinbuch, "Nanometer Level Freeform Surface Measurements with the NANOMEFOS Non-contact Measurement Machine," Proc. SPIE 2009, 7426, 742606.

 

3.  S. Bambrick, M. Bechtold, S. DeFisher, D. Mohring, and J. Meisenzahl, "Recent Developments in Finishing of Deep Concave, Aspheric, and Plano Surfaces Utilizing the Ultraform 5-Axis Coputer Controlled System," Proc. SPIE 2009, 7302, 73020U.

 

KEYWORDS: Conformal optics; freeform optics; aspheric optics; optical fabrication; optical metrology; infrared window

 

 

 

N102-166                              TITLE: Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM) of Metallic Components: Controlled

                                                Thermal Processing

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-265 (F/A-18 Program) and PMA-257 (AV-8B Program)

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a controlled thermal process to produce a uniform microstructure, defect free and near net shape qualify metallic aircraft components using DDM.

 

DESCRIPTION: Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM) of aircraft metallic components is an emerging and innovative manufacturing process which creates metallic parts directly from from powder metal.  These metallic parts are intended to be used as the final product itself with minimal post-processing such as machining and surface finishing.  DDM promises cost, time and efficiency benefits over traditional machining processes (in which material is removed using cutting tools) in the area of low production volumes, processes involving constant design iterations and manufacturing parts that have relatively complex geometric shapes. Additionally, as compared to traditional machining of metal parts, DDM technologies will allow engineers to create more efficient, creative, and innovative aerospace-related designs rapidly and accurately in which complex features and internal passages can be created that could not be created with traditional machining methodologies and techniques. Currently, available direct-metal additive manufacturing process lacks the level of process monitoring and control desirable for process certification efforts. The usage of thermal process monitoring ensures that the deposited material is neither too hot nor too cold. These high or low temperature conditions can lead to defects resulting from either lack of fusion between layers if low processing temperature or excessive vaporization of alloying elements if high processing temperature.  Also, the temperature and solidification rate around the build area are the predominant factors that determine a metal’s resulting microstructure, which, in turn, dictates the material’s mechanical properties.

 

There is a need to control the thermal distribution throughout the manufacturing process.  An innovative approach on direct digital manufacturing process is sought to manufacture uniform/desired microstructure, defect free, and near-net shaped aircraft components.  The process is not limited to single beam melting technology, powder bed thermal design, or cooling system design, etc. 

 

PHASE I: Develop the methodology and tools for a thermal managing system and demonstrate the feasibility of  producing uniform/desired microstructure, defect free, simple-shaped materials with comparable forged mechanical properties

 

PHASE II: Refine/develop material processing controls and parameters which fabricate uniform/desired microstructure, defect free, and near-net shaped aircraft components. Develop and demonstrate a process control tool utilizing the thermal and micostructural models to control the process parameters of commercially available Direct Digital Manufacturing technologies.

 

PHASE III: These tools and methods could be used to qualify a broad range of metallic DDM parts for military and civilian applications.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Direct Digital Manufacturing (MDDM) is an emerging and innovative manufacturing process which creates metallic parts directly from powder metal.  These metallic parts are intended to be used as the final product itself with minimal post-processing such as machining and surface finishing.  DDM promises cost, time and efficiency benefits over traditional machining processes (in which material is removed using cutting tools) in the area of low production volumes, processes involving constant design iterations and manufacturing parts that have relatively complex geometric shapes. Additionally, as compared to traditional machining of metal parts, DDM technologies will allow engineers to create more efficient, creative, and innovative aerospace-related designs rapidly and accurately in which complex features and internal passages can be created that could not be created with traditional machining methodologies and techniques.

 

REFERENCES:

1. William Frazier, Don Polakovics, and Wayne Koegel, “Qualification of Metallic Materials and Structures for Aerospace Applications,” JOM. March 2001.

 

KEYWORDS: Direct Digital Manufacturing, Thermal, Microstructure, Titanium

 

 

 

N102-167                              TITLE: Magnetic materials with strong ferromagnetic precession properties and low

damping factors.

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes, Electronics, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: EMW-FY08-06 - Counter Improvised Explosive Devices Spiral 2

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: The development of magnetic materials which exhibit scalable strong ferromagnetic precession properties with low damping factors for use in high-power microwave generation.

 

DESCRIPTION: Microwave oscillators based on ferromagnetic precession have been demonstrated for continuous-wave low-power devices.  Traditionally, these devices use a small amount of ferromagnetic material with an externally applied bias in the oscillator feedback path.  In this application, the ferromagnetic material is simply used as the resonator and operates at low power.  It has been proposed to significantly increase the size and electrical length of the resonator and to pump it with a fast-rise pulse input to achieve high power microwave (HPM) generation.  Significant material challenges exist that limit the efficiency of this method for HPM generation.  In particular, magnetic precession damping reduces the efficiency and increases internal heating and reduces the maximum pulse repetition rate.  Scalability is also another area that must be addressed.  By nature, these materials exhibit strong nonlinear behavior that can be used to produce the desired oscillation.  Optimized materials will allow for higher designed output powers for a given peak input field.

 

PHASE I: Based on desire to reduce magnetic precession damping, develop a meaningful measurement technique that will predict the performance of available ferromagnetic materials in high power microwave applications. Utilizing this new technique, measure the ferromagnetic precession properties of known/existing ferromagnetic materials in order to characterize their performance as well as derive the basis for a materials approach to enhance the desired properties.

 

PHASE II: Building off of the data and methods generated in Phase I, develop and validate new and novel ferromagnetic materials and fabrication processes of ferromagnetic materials that would result in improved HPM generation. Measure and validate performance gains through Phase I test methodology.

 

PHASE III: Address scale-up issues associated with manufacture of these new materials. Establish a pilot-scale manufacturing process in order to produce and verify consistent and predictable output. Transition technology for manufacturing for large scale.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Improvements to these materials will have application to high-power energy transmission, specifically transformers, commercial electronics, radars, ocillators, delay lines, and power limiters.

 

REFERENCES:

(1) Handbook of Magnetism and Advanced Magnetic Materials

 

(2) Handbook of Magnetic Materials, Vol. 18

 

KEYWORDS: ferromagnetic, precession, microwave, oscillators, materials, IED

 

 

 

N102-168                              TITLE: Integrated blade tip lighting system for rotorcraft

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA-261, H-53 Heavy Lift Helicopters, ACAT I

 

OBJECTIVE: Design and build a reliable, lightweight rotor blade tip lighting system that can be modulated to provide red, green and white navigation lights at the appropriate positions on the azimuth; a hover mode to clearly mark the complete rotor disk circumference to ground crew; and a low-observable, Night-Vision Goggle (NVG) compatible mode for night formation flight.

 

DESCRIPTION: Aircraft flying at night in non-combat areas typically display red and green navigation lights (also known as position lights) at their wingtips to improve visibility to other aircraft and aid in identifying relative orientation. Helicopters, having no fixed wingtips, usually display navigation lights on the sides of their fuselages. This results in a lateral offset that is small compared to the vehicle size, and may limit options for mounting external mission equipment. A lighting system attached to the blade tips that allows navigation lights to be displayed directly at the edges of the rotor disk would greatly improve visibility to other aircraft. A hover mode may also be provided to enhance rotor visibility during ground and shipboard operations. One example of such a system is described in Ref. (1). Desirable attributes include lightweight and reliability; minimal structural modifications to blade, and self-contained power supply and azimuthal phasing means.  Enabling technologies for such a system include thin surface mount, low-power multi-wavelength lighting; small, lightweight energy harvesting devices, and flush-mount air data sensors. A completely self-contained system could find application as a retrofit to existing aircraft as well as in new aircraft designs.

 

PHASE I: Design a complete, self-contained rotorcraft blade tip lighting system that can be used to provide red, green and white navigation lights at appropriate points along the edge of the rotor disk as well as hover and NVG-compatible modes. Bench test critical components, and demonstrate on a rotating structure representing a rotor.

 

PHASE II: Fabricate a full-scale version of the system developed in Phase I, integrate with a flying rotorcraft, and demonstrate in flight. The rotorcraft may be a UAV or manned aircraft, and should be of suitable size to demonstrate applicability of the system to a wide range of aircraft sizes.

 

PHASE III: Transition to a flight-qualified technology that the small business may offer to aircraft manufacturers for incorporation in experimental and/or production aircraft.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Civil sector helicopter safety in night operations will benefit from improved position lighting, particulary in well-lit urban areas with heavy background lighting.

 

REFERENCES:

1. US Patent 7,324,016, "Navigational indicating system for rotary wing aircraft",  Jan, 2008

 

2. US Patent 5,793,164, "Low Intensity Aircraft Rotor Tip Illumination", August, 1998

 

KEYWORDS: rotorcraft; helicopter; blade; navigation, position, lighting,

 

 

 

N102-169                              TITLE: Advanced Reference Cells for Corrosion Control Systems

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: NAVSEA PMS450 Virginia Class Submarine Program, ACAT I

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate capabilities of increased reliability reference cells for use in naval applications including submerged platforms and enclosed spaces.

 

DESCRIPTION: The legacy  reference cells in use on VIRGINIA Class submarines have several performance and reliability issues which must be addressed to improve operational availability and lower maintenance and repair costs.   No VIRGINIA class submarine to date has been delivered with 100% operational  reference cells This has resulted in nuisance alarms, non-optimal operation of the Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP) system, and substantial rework and repair.  In addition, reference cells in tanks and other confined spaces are frequently damaged or destroyed due to the lack of ruggedness and ease of damage in these areas.  

 

Long term performance of existing and next generation digital controlled ICCP systems requires a high level of  performance from reference cells. Condition based maintenance diagnostics for  ships’ underwater hull and ballast tanks rely on reference cell gathered data.  Unknown amounts of drift in reference cell readings and unplanned failures of reference cells can disable these advanced systems.  The need exists for increased reliability/maintainability in reference electrode assemblies.  New materials/chemistries or conceptual designs for a stable microprocessor controlled electrochemical half-cell for seawater environments, are of interest.  These half cell sensor materials must be fully reversible under seawater conductivity and temperature regimes.  They must be able to operate in seawater/freshwater solutions that have a range of  resistivity from 18 Ohm-cm to 20,000 Ohm-cm, with an operating temperature range of 30-95F.   Sensors that are able to survive harsh toxic environments (such as sulfide containing seawater solutions) that limit existing technologies, are of additional interest.  Reference cells should be designed such that installation and power up is simple and straight forward and cabling connections should be designed to survive significant levels of hydrostatic pressure and pressure cycling. Life and reliability requirements are targeted at greater than existing technologies (12 years).  Reference cell drift should be minimized, controllable and well defined.  On-board reference cell diagnostic or prognostic features are desirable.  These features will aid in development of systems that can fully exploit reference cell capabilities and performance over time.  Reference cells developed must operate in a seawater environment of varying conductivity and temperature and be compatible with ship systems in general. Reference cells should require minimal maintenance and designed so that components are modular and underwater replaceable. 

 

PHASE I: Develop and demonstrate prototype reference cell performance for long term evaluation in a laboratory environment simulating Navy operational needs. Demonstrate manufacturability and installation parameters which lead to consistent, repeatable measurements under realistic conditions.

 

PHASE II: New reference cells could be applied to a broad range of military and civilian maritime and infrastructure applications where ICCP systems are relied upon for corrosion protection – for example, commercial shipping and interstate highway bridge maintenance.

 

PHASE III: As part of Phase III complete electrode assemblies will be evaluated to provide proof of conformance with pertinent shipyard specifications (these will be provided during development).  Final prototypes meeting the relevant performance exit criteria will be installed by shipbuilder trades to demonstrate installation ability. After these tests, if selected, the products will be included in the FNC transition path.  The FNC transition strategy includes integration of components by PMS450 into the R&D programs for VIRGINIA Block IV.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: New reference cells could be applied to a  broad range of military and civilian maritime and infrastructure applications where ICCP systems are relied upon for corrosion protection – for example, commercial shipping and interstate highway bridge maintenance.

 

REFERENCES: 

1. K. E. Lucas, E. D. Thomas, K. I. Kaznoff and E. Hogan, “Design of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection Systems for US Navy Hulls,” Designing Cathodic Protection Systems for Marine Structures and Vehicles, ASTM, STP 1370, pp. 17-38, 1999.

 

2. Underwater Ship Husbandry Manuals, Chapter 19, Cathodic Protection Systems, S0600-AA-PRO-190, NAVSEA 00C5 (Distribution A).

 

3. R. A. Adey (ed), Modelling of Cathodic Protection Systems, Chapter 2, Shipboard Impressed Current Cathodic Protection System Analysis, WIT Press, 2005.

 

KEYWORDS: Reference cells; electrochemistry; corrosion; condition based maintenance

 

 

 

N102-170                              TITLE: Neck Load Simulation During Individual Warfighting Postures and Maneuvers

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Biomedical, Human Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: EMW-FY09-06 EC, Individual Warfighter Lightweight Protective System

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a validated simulation for predicting neck loads during realistic and repetitive  Warfighter tasks incorporating fatigue factors.

 

DESCRIPTION: The desire to protect the Warfighter’s head from higher ballistic threats has required the use of heavier and heavier materials.  This headborne load creates a potential cause of intense fatigue or even injury while conducting normal dismounted military operations.  Advancements in neck load evaluations, specific to these types of movements, are needed in order to improve helmet designs that are affected not only by added weight but also by the placement of headborne sensors and communications devices. As a Warfighter engages in common activities such as marching, crouching and running, the angle of the head relative to the body shifts so that not only do head-supported masses load the neck axially, potentially causing disk compression, but off-axis head orientation taxes the neck muscles, potentially causing  muscle strains. This problem is accentuated by the fact that head-mounted gear may change during the course of an operation, and the appropriate placement of a piece of equipment on the helmet for a person in a marching stance might, for example, actually be injurious to a person in a prolonged crouch. A physics-based simulation tool is needed that would simulate neck loads while a Warfighter conducted common Warfighter movements while wearing various headborne equipment that varied in weight and placement.  It would demonstrate the ability to optimize neck loads in order to reduce fatigue and injury while improving mobility, stability, and comfort.  This simulation tool would include the ability to analyze adjustment strategies, such as minimizing neck torque by revising the placement of head-mounted gear or by changing head angle or amount of knee bending.  The tool would advance current analytical capabilities relative to head-supported masses by adding and validating the fatigue component which does not exist in current models.  This effort would use Government collected data for demonstration and validation.  This effort would enable progress towards a mission-based optimization tool for designing or selecting headborne equipment.  Initial work conducted under the “Validation of a Physics-Based Simulation of Warfighter Neck Load” study funded by ONR yielded a model based on limited experimental Army ARIEM data of Soldiers performing basic mission maneuvers with combat helmets (with and without NVGs). This model proved to be a fairly inaccurate predictor of load influence on the head and neck. While the initial model was not to the level of maturity required for engineers, designers and human factors personnel, the base model did provide a basis for continuing development as the indication are that a significantly more accurate predictive model can be achieved.

 

Phase I:  Build and demonstrate a validated physics-based simulation that estimates neck load of a Warfighter engaged in at least three common mission tasks; such as marching, running, jumping, etc.  This simulation should include the ability to accurately analyze neck load adjustment strategies and account for fatigue and the onset of potential injury. This basic and validated simulation tool will allow for further investigations to maximize warfighter performance and reduce injuries from over burdened muscular and skeletal systems.

 

Phase II:  Using existing experimental bio-mechanics data and the validated simulation tool developed in phase I demonstrate the applicability of the tool by designing an improved helmet system (center of gravity, weight distribution and stability)  and identify maximum loads the head/neck can carry over various durations and operational tasks without  causing significant fatigue or injury (temporary or permanent).  Simulation will demonstrate ability to optimize neck loads based on equipment design and individual movement.

 

Phase III:  This tool can be used by military R&D and acquisition organizations to design and select protective headborne equipment. Phase III will seek to expand the scope of mission tasks to include more intense select mission functions (firing weapons, high impact insults, NVG compatibility and weight distributions and etc).  Improved combat helmet design concepts developed under separate FNC funding will be incorporated into the simulations to optimize performance prior to user evaluations.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  The sports industry can benefit by being able to evaluate and optimize protective headgear against fatigue or discomfort. 

 

REFERENCES: 

1 - Draft Final Report: Validation of a Physics-Based Simulation of Warfighter Neck Loads, U.S. Army Natick Soldier Center & Office of Naval Research, 20 pages (uploaded in SITIS 5/17/10).

 

2. PM-MERS study “Investigation of the Preferred Mass Properties for Infantry Headwear Systems.”

 

3. ONR and Army study on “Validation of a Physics-Based Simulation of Warfighter Neck Load.”

Ashrafiuon H, Alem NM, McEntire BJ. Effects of weight and center of gravity location of head-supported devices on neck loading. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1997 Oct;68(10):915-22. PubMed PMID: 9327117.

 

4. Buhrman JR, Perry CE. Human and manikin head/neck response to +Gz acceleration when encumbered by helmets of various weights. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1994 Dec;65(12):1086-90. PubMed PMID: 7872908.

 

5. McCloskey K, Esken RL. Evaluation of integrated night vision goggle (NVG) helmets under sustained +Gz. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995 Feb;66(2):118-25. PubMed PMID: 7726774.

 Manoogian SJ, Kennedy EA, Wilson KA, Duma SM, Alem NM. Predicting neck injuries due to head-supported mass. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2006 May;77(5):509-14. PubMed PMID: 16708531.

 

6. Sovelius R, Oksa J, Rintala H, Huhtala H, Siitonen S. Neck muscle strain when  wearing helmet and NVG during acceleration on a trampoline. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2008 Feb;79(2):112-6. PubMed PMID: 18309908.

 

KEYWORDS: simulation; neck load; validation; biomechanics; headwear; helmet

 

 

 

N102-171                              TITLE: Compact Control Module for Short Towed Arrays

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: This project will support SHD-FY07-01, SHD-FY10-03, SHD-FY10-05

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this topic is to develop a control module that could be incorporated into a towed array to control its depth and location. This technology would increase the control of the array, and add to its capability thereby enhancing the array's system performance.

 

DESCRIPTION: Current towed arrays use a drogue system that uses drag to straighten the array while it is being towed. This system increases the drag on the array and the length of the array. This system also reduces effectiveness since it reduces tow speed and, at very low speed, this causes the array to droop and hit the bottom.

 

This topic proposes the development of an array module for incorporation into the end of the array. This module can apply the required force needed to keep the array straight and prevent the array from hitting the bottom at low speed. The module must be designed to be low drag and not add any more drag than the current drogue system. The system also must not add any additional flow or mechanical noise to the array sensors.

 

New technologies will need to be developed beyond what is currently used in this application. These new technologies may include very compact buoyancy engines that require very small amounts of power compared to current state of the art, low noise actuators to minimize acoustic interference with towed array elements, new low noise/low drag fairing technology design to minimize acoustic interference with array elements, etc.

 

The Towed Array Control Module would have application to the Navy platforms conducting undersea surveillance missions. This control module would be beneficial to arrays by providing the ability to actively vice passively control the array depth and position behind the towing platform at low speeds. This active depth control could be applicable to all towed array use in waters shallower than current systems, and would reduce the damage to towed arrays by reducing the amount of time towed arrays are dragged on the bottom.

 

PHASE I: Design a towed array control module with a focus on the new innovation in technology over the current state of the art. For high risk technologies, perform a bench top test to reduce program risks in Phase II. In addition to the design information, include the expected noise that will be emitted from any actuators and expected flow noise from the design in the Phase I report.

 

PHASE II: Complete detailed design from Phase I effort.  Build and test two prototype towed array control modules for use in development arrays towed behind a surface ship. The contractor may conduct testing using their facilities and equipment to test the performance of the module.  If necessary, the government will make available two weeks of test time in San Diego on a government owned array towed behind a government supplied ship to test performance of the module at no cost to the contractor for use of government facilities and equipment (funded by ONR). 

 

PHASE III: Integrate the Control Modules into Navy ASW programs of record.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: As more industry moves into the ocean environment, new markets are increasing for monitoring man made noise in the environment. This technology could be used by commercial industry (oil and gas, fisheries, agriculture, etc) and the recreational community to monitor the noise omitted from man made objects and conduct research on the effects on Marine life or use a method to mitigate effects on marine life.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Description of SURTASS towed array http://www.globalsecurity.org/intell/systems/surtass.htm

 

2. Description of MFTA http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/MFTA-The-US-Navy-New-Towed-Array-for-Naval-Detection-04956/

 

3. Description of TB 29 towed array http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/systems/tb-29.htm

 

4. Paper on theoretical work for towed array control:

http://audiophile.tam.cornell.edu/randpdf/qdmathu1.pdf Keywords: Trim, variable buoyancy, tethers, cable, arrays

 

KEYWORDS: Trim, variable buoyancy, tethers, cable, arrays

 

 

 

N102-172                              TITLE: Advanced Flight Controls for Ultra-agile Small Unmanned Air Vehicles

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Air Platform, Ground/Sea Vehicles

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PMA263, Navy STUAS

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate advanced flight control algorithms tailored towards multi-flight-mode Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV) that are suitable for efficient thrust-borne and wing-borne flight in challenging maritime environments.

 

DESCRIPTION: Current small Unmanned Air Vehicle Systems (UASs) have great potential for Department of Defense applications. However, the large launch and recovery footprint of current systems, limited range and persistence, and operational and basing in-flexibility of today’s UASs prevent them from being utilized to their full potential. Technologies are needed that facilitate the development of small (<150 lbs gross weight) Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) that have mission range and endurance far surpassing the current state of the art. For example, the current Scan Eagle UAV, with video payload has a range of approximately 2,500 km and an endurance of approximately 25 hrs. With advanced rotor designs and flight controls, the objective is to increase these values by at least 50% and gain VTOL capability to allow for stop-and-stare sensor operations and more flexible basing concepts on sea-based platforms. A vehicle with this capability requires a versatile auto-pilot that is able to control the aircraft in both VTOL and cruise, as well as conversion modes of flight in a variety of environmental conditions. Navy UAVs are required to be operated from sea-based platforms which include large ships for blue-water operations, smaller vessels in the littorals, submarines and unmanned surface vessels. UAVs operating from at-sea platforms must be agile enough to perform in a variety of challenging environmental conditions including operations from fast-moving vessels, gusty winds and turbulence from ship super-structures.

 

PHASE I: Develop the auto-pilot/flight-control architecture that would be used for phase II demonstration. Lab and/or limited flight demonstrations of flight control functionality are highly desirable. A test vehicle for phase II demonstration should be identified and in a sufficiently advanced stage of development suitable for phase II demonstration.

 

PHASE II: Develop an auto-pilot/flight control system and integrate into a demonstration air-vehicle. Conduct flight tests to demonstrate air-vehicle control in VTOL, conversion and cruise(wing-borne flight). The ability to maintain air-vehicle control and precise ground position-keeping in variable winds up to 25 kts is highly desirable.

 

PHASE III: The phase III will entail advanced development of the small unmanned air-vehicle concept accompanied by testing and demonstration in operationally representative environments. Sea-trails with full demonstration of launch, execution of mission relevant flight profiles and recovery fall within the scope of the phase III. The phase III product would be at a technical readiness level (TRL) of 6 and suitable for transition to acquisition.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Small UAVs are becoming increasingly sought-after by law-enforcement, border patrol, disaster surveillance teams, farm applications, meteorology, climate change data collection and geological surveys. As the FAA moves towards certification of UAV operation in commercial airspace, the value of small UAVs will increase significantly, particularly with the high level of capability of this vehicle concept.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Mark A. Motter, "Adaptive Flight Control Research at NASA", http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20080022957_2008021658.pdf.

 

2. Anthony J. Calise, Rolf T. Rysdyk, "Nonlinear Adaptive Flight Control using Neural Networks", http://www.aa.washington.edu/research/afsl/publications/rysdyk1998adaptiveNN.pdf.

 

KEYWORDS: UAV; flight controls; autopilot; ship launch and recovery; autonomous; UAS

 

 

 

N102-173                              TITLE: Fire Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction Tool for Aluminum Ship

Structures During and After Fire

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes

 

OBJECTIVE: The Navy has a requirement for a validated analysis tool to predict fire growth, fire spread, heat transfer through structure boundaries, time dependent material softening, structural stability, and residual strength of advanced aluminum structure during and after fire. This SBIR is seeking proposals for modules which address an aspect of this problem, and a system integrator to integrate the modules into a prediction tool.

 

DESCRIPTION: The use of aluminum alloys and their extruded structural components in marine construction has a great advantage in minimizing a vessel’s weight. Given its one-third density of steel and 70% of the tensile strength of steel, the resulting weight of aluminum high speed craft is much lower than a similar vessel constructed from steel. The reduction of hull structural weight allows for increased payload, top speed, and operation range at lower operational and total ownership cost. Protection of aluminum structure from fire is a key issue in aluminum structural design as aluminum’s properties are quickly reduced when the temperature exceeds 150 degree Celsius. In addition, the material properties of aluminum are permanently modified by elevated temperature causing the structure to be weakened following a fire event. Given a larger (more than two times) coefficient of thermal expansion than steel, the resulting large thermal stress/strains in an aluminum hull during a local fire could lead to failures elsewhere in the vessel. A strong technical fire modeling and residual strength assessment capability is very important to replace the current prescriptive approach to a performance-based analysis procedure that will allow designers greater freedom and flexibility in laying out designs and making structural fire protection decisions to ensure adequate fire safety.

 

PHASE I: Demonstrate feasibility of proposed analysis approach. Perform a preliminary validation study using test data. Propose a conceptual design for a prototype software/tool to define a fire scenario, construct structural model, and perform prediction.

 

PHASE II: Fully develop all the solution modules and integrate them into a tool that can be commercialized. The tool should capture the key events including fire growth, fire spread, smoke movement, heat transfer to structural boundaries, fire and structure coupling, time and temperature dependent material response, softening, structural stability, post-fire strength assessment. Validate that the prototype software provides appropriate results by correlating it to well defined test data at component and structure level.

 

PHASE III: Prepare a user-friendly package that can be used by engineers in the naval, shipyard, and aerospace industries in collaboration with a potential software vendor for commercialization. Expand the experimental data base collected from Navy, DOD, and commercial industries. Conduct validation for the specific area of interest.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Damage and collapse in an aluminum structure from a fire event is not unique to naval vessels and military aircraft; it is equally prevalent in the civilian sector. Outside the ship industry, the aerospace, oil and power industry are increasingly using aluminum construction. The validated and user-friendly toolkit developed in this program has great potential for optimizing the placement and configuration of structural fire protection during the design stage, providing guidance to the crew in a fire situation, and performing the post-fire damage evaluation for decision making.

 

REFERENCES:

1. SNAME (1974), “Aluminum fire protection guidelines”, SNAME T&R Bulletins 2-21, New York: Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, 1974.

 

KEYWORDS: Aluminum Structure; Fire Simulation; Thermal-Mechanical Coupling; Material Softening; Structural Instability

 

 

 

N102-174                              TITLE: Development and scale-up of very low-cost, light-weight, flexible solar cells

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes, Electronics, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PM Mariine Corps Expeditionary Power Systems

 

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this effort is to develop and demonstrate on increasing scales novel solar cells designs and manufacturing processes consistent with production of  very low cost solar cells (<$0.50 per watt) that are lightweight, flexible, rugged, with greater than 6% power conversion efficiency and greater than 3 year lifetime.

 

DESCRIPTION: Current solar cell technology is impressive, but for the home or business owner, the cost is too high to compete with conventional grid power.  Real energy costs can be substantially higher for the military, but high acquisition costs and difficult form factors still limit the adoption of solar technologies.  The availability of light-weight, flexible, and low-cost solar cells would significantly increase adoption of solar technologies in the military, particular at the warfighter level for personal power, at the base camp level, and for use in distributed sensing.

 

Organic solar cell technology, on the research level, has improved to the point where simple printed cells can have a power conversion efficiency of 6 percent, close to that of commercial amorphous silicon cells and at a level where there is commercial viability.  The organic cells could potentially cost 80 percent less than cells with similar efficiency.  To reach this production cost, manufacturing processes and cell designs need to be developed consistent both with large scale manufacturing and with the precision, cleanliness, and control necessary to obtain optimal cell performance. The challenges here push the state-of-the-art not only in demanding high performance from the active materials, but also in light trapping, electrode design, and barrier strategies, all of which must be consistent with low cost manufacturing on flexible substrates.

 

PHASE I: Using an ambient atmosphere processing technique, produce active films with at least 100 square cm area and containing at least 10 cells of 5 sq cm.  Non-ambient processing can be used for electrodes and packaging.  Demonstrate at least 4.0% total area power conversion efficiency under AM1.5 illumination and for 100 hours of continuous illumination at 1 sun or higher.  Deliver a film for performance verification.  Prepare a report on approach to further develop process to meet full objectives (<$0.50 watt, >6% power conversion efficiency, > 3 year lifetime).

 

PHASE II: Meet full program objectives (<$0.50 watt, >6% power conversion efficiency on module level, > 3 year lifetime) on 0.1 sq meter devices manufactured on flexible substrates by processes directly amenable to cost effective scale-up for full production.  Present a plan for commercialization of this technology.

 

PHASE III: Scale to cost effective production level.  Work with acquisition programs or current vendors to insert lower cost solar cell technology into products for military applications.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Low cost solar cells will greatly shorten the payback period associated with investing in solar power for the home or business and thus could significantly increase adoption of solar technologies.

 

REFERENCES:

1. C.N. Hoth, S.A. Choulis, P. Schilinsky, C.J. Brabec, Adv. Materials 19 (2007) 3973.

 

2. C.N. Hoth, R. Steim, P. Schilinsky, S.A. cholis, S.F. Tedde, O. Hayden, C.J. Brabec, Organic Electronics 10 (2009) 587.

 

KEYWORDS: organic photovoltaics; OPV; printing; spray coating; low cost manufacturing; flexible

 

 

 

N102-175                              TITLE: Automatic Data Representation, Analysis, and Visualization

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Sensors, Battlespace

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and implement techniques for fast and accurate automatic representation, analysis, and visualization of unstructured digital data of different modalities for a large class of navy-related applications.

 

DESCRIPTION: Current technologies for data representation tend to fall into two categories.  The first category aims at structuring data at the semantic level that provides a more contextual description of data content.  Ontologies such as OWL belong to this category.  While this view is closer to human cognition, the approach requires a great deal of human interaction and expertise to design a quality information system from unstructured data such as written reports, text documents, images, or general sensor data. It also demands information update and management that cannot be executed in near real-time to support DoD’s time-sensitive missions.   At the other extreme, one can tag an unstructured dataset with metadata.  The metadata fields, however, are often prone to errors and, more importantly, ignore data content.

 

This solicitation seeks a new alternative to the two formalizations described briefly above.  In particular, ONR is seeking a data-driven framework that can address the stated objective with mathematical or statistical rigor.  For instance, a 3-D visual presentation must accurately preserve the information in a high-dimensional data set.  By the same token, a fast numerical algorithm for data analysis and extraction of salient information must be supported by a theoretical study on its efficacy and efficiency with respect to the data size and errors.  A new approach that can handle different data modalities and establish overlapped or correlated information between them, if there is any, is of great interest to ONR.

 

The recent developments of fast numerical methods in linear algebra and optimization together with the kernel-based, manifold-based, graph-based methods for inductive learning and classification are pushing the frontier of data-driven techniques in several application domains with preliminary results that look promising.  More rigorous fine-tuning of algorithms and testing of applications are needed to ascertain the viability of a proposed methodology in real-life scenarios.  

 

For the purpose of algorithm development, the performers may use their own data sets provided that these data are in the realm of naval applications.  The Navy also reserves the right to test the algorithms and their implementation with data sets of an appropriate type in order to assess performance, scalability, and estimate computational resources.

 

PHASE I: Develop algorithms that can automatically represent, analyze, and update unstructured data of different modalities, grounded on scientific rigor.   Validate the proposed approach with experiments on various Navy-related data sets.

 

PHASE II: Develop algorithms to find, compare, and bridge potentially correlated information in different data sets based on the results established in Phase I.   Develop a visualization method for high-dimensional data which is user-friendly and allows user-interactive tasks to refine the process of data representation and information discovery.  Validate all tasks in an integrated system.

 

PHASE III: The end product should result in a dual-use technology that shares military and commercial interests such as automatic surveillance and biotechnology, biomedicine.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The following industries will benefit from the product developed under this SBIR topic: biotechnology, biomedicine,

chemical informatics, material informatics, data mining, data integration.

 

REFERENCES:

[1] V. Rokhlin and M. Tygert, A Fast Randomized Algorithm for Over-determined Linear Least Squares Regression, PNAS, Vol. 105, No. 36, pp 13212-13217, 2008.

 

[2] M. Belkin, and P. Niyogi, Laplacian Eigenmaps for Dimensionality Reduction and Data Representation, Neural Computation, Vol. 15, No. 6, pp. 1373-1396, 2003.

 

[3] D. Donoho, I. U. Rahman, I. Drori, V. Stodden, P. Schroder, Multiscale Representations for Manifold-valued Data, SIAM Multiscale Model. & Simul., Vol. 4, No. 4, pp. 1201-1232, 2005.

 

[4] R. R. Coifman, S. Lafon, A. B. Lee, M. Maggioni, B. Nadler, F. Warner, and S. W. Zucker, Geometric diffusions as a tool for harmonic analysis and structure definition of data: Multiscale methods, PNAS, Vol. 102, pp 7432-7437, 2005.

 

[5] G. Wahba, Encoding Dissimilarity Data for Statistical Model Building, Preprint, 2009.

 

[6] K. Fukumizu, F. Bach, M. I. Jordan, Kernel Dimension Reduction in Regression, Ann. Stat., Vol. 37, No. 4, pp 1871-1905, 2009.

 

KEYWORDS: fast algorithms; multimodality data; information extraction; information processing; pattern discovery; automatic learning and classification

 

 

 

N102-176                              TITLE: Disambiguation of Entity Association Statements

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Human Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PM Intel

 

OBJECTIVE: Advances have been made with regard to our ability to express large disparate unstructured data sources (e.g. text, images, audio) as connected entity graphs in resource description framework (RDF).   There remains practical problems, however, working with the large the RDF data store that can easily be generated from even modest sized data stores.  Due to entity and association uncertainty, current implementations of RDF data stores become filled with redundant statements, preventing the expression of a large data corpus as one connected graph.  The objective of this topic is to develop algorithms and techniques for level 1 fusion of association statements in a large RDF data store.

 

DESCRIPTION: There are a number of technologies and systems today that perform named entity disambiguation in support of entity extraction on structured and unstructured data.  Reference sets are used to resolve ambiguity and return results.  Other implementations may be as basic as providing a list of possible results and have the ambiguity resolved by the information seeker such as that implemented in Wikipedia.  It has proved beneficial to anchor terms in a recognized vocabulary and ontology.  For instance, WordNet offers a lexical database of words for the English language.  This topic seeks to tailor or develop disambiguation algorithms that can be effectively applied to large RDF graphs.  

 

The objective of a large RDF data store is to enable the warfighter or analyst to find everything known about a specific entity (person, group, place, object, event/behavior) rapidly and accurately.  The search strategies are dependent on a level of clustering of related RDF that has not to date been demonstrated.  Redundant entities and associations cause broken connections. 

 

The goal of this topic is to develop and demonstrate a new class of level 1 fusion (disambiguation) algorithms that can be applied to large RDF data stores.  Offerors may examine tagging RDF if that is found to support the overall objective.  The offeror can also use information contained within the triple itself.   

 

Research is needed to expand entity disambiguation concepts into the domain of large association (RDF) data stores.  The offerror needs to assume that a RDF data store of interest is populated with disparate statements derived from a wide variety of data stores.  The goal of the topic is to generate a single connected graph from large RDF that contains no redundant entities and no missed connections.  In order to achieve the necessary information refinement on a topic and support evolution of RDF knowledge bases, examples of areas which need to be addressed include: 1) dealing with entity uncertainty  2) dealing with entity information from different knowledge bases that results in a contradiction, 3) creation and updating of statements regarding an entity in a knowledge base or common feature space that do not contradict existing statements on that entity, and 3) deletion of an entity or entity statements without breaking other associations that may refer to that entity.

 

The Navy is interested in innovative R&D that involves technical risk.  Proposed work should have technical and scientific merit.  Creative solutions are desired.

 

PHASE I: Develop algorithms that can identify redundant statements and missed connections in a large RDF data store.   Measure and show clear progress in RDF statement disambiguation and in fixing missed connections.  Perform a proof of concept against a data store containing tens of thousands of statements.  Results from the model development and tests are to be documented in a technical report and presented at a selected conference.

 

PHASE II: Produce a prototype system that is capable scalable to very large data stores.  The prototype system will be able to automatically process and display/catalog on numerous topics defined by the user in near real-time.   The model(s) and techniques are to include other forms of data besides textual and should include audio and image type sources.  Context based tie points that can be developed on text, audio, and images will be demonstrated in the prototype.  The prototype should be a software application that is compatible with a service oriented architecture and demonstrated against real tactical data sources (secret level).

 

PHASE III: Produce a system capable of deployment and operational evaluation.  The system should address topics or themes that are specific to developing a terrorist threat assessment or identification of techniques, tactics, and procedures based on system developed tie points.  Tie points will be presented in human understandable form.  The system should be modified to operate in accordance with guidelines provided by a program of record.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: There are many commercial applications including credit card fraud detection, business activity monitoring, and security monitoring that would benefit from advanced data enterprise library services.  Presently, there is a strong need to protect military and civilian personnel from terrorist attack by analyzing large data stores.  To facilitate interoperability, the systems should operate in a net-centric environment and provide reliable performance.  Commercial value and cost savings is achieved by operation in a distributed service oriented architecture with other applications.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Paolo Bouquet, Luciano Serafini, and Heiko Stoermer. “Introducing Context into RDF Knowledge Bases”, in Proceedings of SWAP 2005, the 2nd Italian Semantic Web Workshop, Trento, Italy, December 14-16, 2005. CEUR Workshop Proceedings, ISSN 1613-0073.  http://sunsite.informatik.rwth-aachen.de/Publications/CEUR-WS/Vol-166/70.pdf

 

2. Barbara Bazzanella, Paolo Bouquet, and Heiko Stoermer. “A Cognitive Contribution to Entity Representation and Matching”, Technical Report DISI-09-004, Ingegneria e Scienza dell'Informazione, University of Trento. 2009. http://eprints.biblio.unitn.it/archive/00001540/

 

3. Deepak P, Jyothi John, Sandeep Parameswaran.  “Context Disambiguation in Web Search Results”, in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Web Services 2004 (ICWS’04) 0-7695-2167-3/04.

 

4. Smith, Barry, Lowell Viznor and James Schoening, “Universal Core Semantic Layer”, OIC2009, http://c4i.gmu.edu/OIC09/papers/OIC2009_5_SmithEtAll.pdf

 

KEYWORDS: correlation; data fusion; terrorist threats; human language; entity disambiguation; entity extraction

 

 

 

N102-177                              TITLE: Natural Language Dialogue for Supervisory Control of Autonomous Ground

Vehicles

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Ground/Sea Vehicles, Human Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: FNC: Naval Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare, MCSC PM Motor Transportation

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop human-centric tools for supervisory control of autonomous unmanned ground vehicles based on natural language dialogue that enhances the likelihood of mission success, lowers the cognitive workload of the operator, simplifies the interface hardware, enables heads-up & hands-free operation and improves operator trust in vehicle autonomy.

 

DESCRIPTION: Emerging Marine Corps strategy is that small units will be deployed beyond the limits of traditional logistics support. One potential solution to this problem is the use of autonomous ground vehicle transport of supplies and casualty evacuation. The DARPA Urban Challenge indicated that autonomous navigation of ground vehicles is feasible. However, in tactical situations involving small units, complex vehicle control interfaces are not practical, impose training burdens, have high cognitive demands, render the operator vulnerable, limit situation awareness, and preclude the operator from performing other duties. There exists a need to develop the technologies for supervisory control of autonomous vehicles that is natural and intuitive. In small combat units, teamwork is based on natural language dialogue and gesture interactions, where gesture serves to disambiguate spatial and object references. Research to develop natural language dialogue system integrated with the control architecture of autonomous vehicles would enable a natural supervisory control of the vehicles. This would include the ability of the vehicle to express its current status (with respect to goals and subsystems). This could be supplemented by the use of hand and arm gesture, Wiimote pointing and gesture or laser designators to help disambiguate spatial references in cases where there is line of sight control.

 

PHASE I: Identify natural language dialogue algorithms and architectures suitable for integration with the control systems of autonomous ground vehicles. Conduct research into autonomous control architectures that represent plans, goals and actions that are addressable by natural language. Conduct design study of integration of natural language dialogue and control architecture. Analysis of minimal display requirements to supplement natural language based control. Identify gesture based control language and gesture recognition algorithms suitable for ground vehicle control.

 

PHASE II: Based on the natural language dialogue software and control system identified and developed in phase I, design and build a prototype software and hardware system, using an existing vehicle capable of outdoor operation.

 

PHASE III: Further develop the prototype dialogue system integrated with autonomous control and demonstrate its capability for vehicle control in an outdoor environment. Evaluate ease of use of the interface and performance of the vehicle control.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Supervisory control of farm equipment, warehouse vehicles, surveillance patrol vehicles, port freight handling equipment.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Juraj Dzifcak, Matthias Scheutz, Chitta Baral, and Paul Schermerhorn

(2009) "What to do and how to do it: Translating natural language directives into temporal and dynamic logic representation for goal management and action execution." In Proceedings of the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Kobe, Japan, May 2009.

 

2. Pierre Lison and Geert-Jan M. Kruijff (2009). "Efficient parsing of spoken inputs for human-robot interaction." In Proceedings of the 18th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN 09), Toyama, Japan.

 

3. M Loper, N Koenig, S Chernova, S Jenkins, C Jone (2009) Mobile human-robot teaming with environmental tolerance. In: Proceedings of the ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, p. 157-164.

 

KEYWORDS: natural language dialogue, autonomous ground vehicles, gesture, control architecture

 

 

 

N102-178                              TITLE: Combined electricity production and cryocooling

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Sensors, Electronics, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Silk Tread EC and SSEE

 

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the functions of cryo-cooling and the production of electricity at low temperatures can be combined into a single system. This would strongly enable the utilization of cryogenic electronics by removing a dominant source of heat load on the cooler, the parasitic heat load that flows down to the electronics along with the electrical power needed to operate it.

 

DESCRIPTION: Cryogenic electronics such as cryoCMOS and superconducting digital logic require both a low temperature environment and a supply of electricity of an AC or DC nature. The electrical leads bringing that current down from room temperature also transport both static and dynamically produced heat loads to the low temperature environment. Were the required electrical power produced at low temperature, this lead related heat load would be omitted, eliminating more than half the total load in a digital superconducting system. So long as this electrical production is a byproduct of the cooling, and thus does not add a new inefficiency heat load, the system energy performance will clearly benefit. When packaging such systems for military applications, there is a further requirement that the system operate in a moving environment which may include significant g forces at arbitrary angles, shock, and continual vibration.  This unpredictability of the net mechanical acceleration appears to favor thermodynamic cycles with strongly forced flows. The shock and imported vibration aspects require extra care be given to details such as insuring that moving parts do not drag on their enclosure’s walls and suggest the use of gas bearings rather than wearing ones. Because of the low temperatures desired (4-40K) and the resultant low Carnot efficiency, the thermodynamic cycle selected must have an expectation of delivering high energy efficiency (percentage of Carnot limit) after engineering optimization. In addition, magnetic fields originating from the cooler’s operation and  straying into the sample space must be controllable down into the micro-Gauss range. The complete cooler is very likely to be of a multi-stage design and the provision of ways to change the relative magnitude of the heat lift on each stage is desirable, thereby making some stages available as heat sinks for heat loads that are independent of the operation of lower temperature stages. A design that can be scaled to different cooling and electrical loads is particularly desirable. The first design should be notionally for 1.5 W of lift at around 4K while providing 10A DC current at 2 mV bias at 30K or 300W of lift and 60 Hz AC current at 1.5V bias and 20A, both at 30K .

 

PHASE I: The goal of phase 1 is to complete a detailed engineering design for the combined cooling stage and electrical generator to be realized in phase 2. The most desired temperature for this stage would be 30K, tho both higher (to 70K) and lower (to 3K) temperature designs will be considered. Estimates of the ratio of cooling power and electrical power produced, the volume added by the addition of the generation function, and the percent of Carnot efficiency that might be achieved should be made during this phase and discussed in any phase 2 proposal written. The phase 1 proposal should carefully explain why the specific thermodynamic cycle proposed is well suited for the entire imagined 4K, multistage cooler and notionally how each of the performance/reliability issues mentioned in the description section could be addressed during later phases.

 

PHASE II: During phase 2, the vendor will realize, test, and iterate the design formulated during phase 1. In addition, the design of a complete 4K tactical cooler able to generate/deliver electrical power at about 30K will be formulated and modeled, even if funding prevents its complete realization.

 

PHASE III: During phase 3, the vendor will realize, test, and iterate the complete design formulated during phase 2. Then the resulting product will be combined with low temperature electronics and used to demonstrate system functionality in field tests of the combined technologies.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The primary commercial application is likely to be cryoCMOS server farms. This is because room temperature silicon based computers have run into fundamental physics related issues (intense (100’s of W/cm2) waste heat) that will prevent their further increases in speed. Increasing the number of cores adds substantially to the difficulty of programming and thus its typical computational inefficiency. By using cryogenic temperatures in the 30-100K range, the speed of CMOS can be doubled at the same time as the energy dissipation per flop can be reduced. CryoCMOS will win out in contexts where latency matters, especially if the multiplier that describes the wall plug power required to lift a W from the cold stage can be minimized by eliminating the heat load associated with delivering the computer’s power. Applications in research laboratory instrumentation and automated test equipment are also likely to develop

 

REFERENCES:

1. M. Rabinowitz, "Cryogenic Power Generation," Cryogenics Vol. 17, 319-330 (1977).

 

2. M. Rabinowitz, "Superconducting Power Generation," IEEE Power Engineering Review 20 No.5 (2000) pp.8 – 11

 

3. Fevrier, A; Laumond, Y, “Prospective Uses of Superconductors for 50/60 Hertz Applications,” Proceedings of the Eleventh International Cryogenic Engineering Conference--ICEC 11; Berlin; FRG; 22-25 Apr. 1986. pp. 139-152. 1986

 

4. Istvan Vajda, "Conceptual Design of an All Superconducting Mini Power Plant Model," delta, pp.267, The First IEEE International Workshop on Electronic Design, Test and Applications (DELTA '02), 2002

 

KEYWORDS: Cryocoolers; electrical generation; cryopackaging; tactical cryocoolers; Carnot efficiency; parasitic heat loads

 

 

 

N102-179                              TITLE: Artificial Tissue Matrices for Bone Repair

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Biomedical

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Medical Develop Program/BUMED, Family of Fleet Medical Equipment/MCSC

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop a completely artificial bone substitute material that mimics human bone and can replace long bones, facial bones and skull bones. This product would be used to accelerate wound healing from Improvised Explosive Device (IED) explosions and facial wounds from snipers which devastate warfighters. Naval forces presently exhibit 90% of the head and neck combats today in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

DESCRIPTION: The proposed product will accelerate wound healing. IED destruction of long bone and facial features necessitate bone replacement. “Although several major progresses have been introduced in the field of bone regenerative medicine during the years, current therapies...still have many limitations.”1 Current therapies utilize bone harvesting or frozen demineralized freeze-dried cadaver bone when wounds are small.  In larger wounds, metal or plastic forms are used. The proposed technology will ideally reduce long-term problems of current methods: limited availability, donor site morbidity, immune response, and disease transmission, & expense including multiple surgeries and long hospital stays & rehabilitation.

 

Several new methods are currently being studied. Resorbable polymer membranes of the poly (lactide) chemical class are a promising technique for single-step reconstruction of large bone defects2. Bioresorbable materials have the potential to avoid the issues that occur with metallic implants, such as strain, shielding and corrosion3. Synthetic polymers are widely used in biomaterial applications. For example, both collagen type I and hydroxyapatite were found to enhance osteoblast differentiation4. However, new methods and materials are continually being brought to the forefront. An example is the development of nanoceramic matrices, nanoporous biocapsules, and other complex nanostructured materials.5 The newer technologies will likely be better in terms of integration, reduced infection, compatibility, and strength. The potential cost savings would be in excess of 500 million dollars to DoD and would effect a 30 billion dollar market.

 

PHASE I: Explore alternative potential composites that may suffice as artificial bone and identification of methods that boost the healing process of the recipient bone tissue and facilitate integration of artificial parts.

 

PHASE II: Prepare and characterize artificial bone matrix prototypes to determine osteoblastic integration and maturation in vitro. These studies will determine feasibility of use for artificial bone prototypes in bone healing. Testing parameters may include, but are not limited to, percentage integration, lack of infection, effect on osteoblast maturation and integration, exclusion of non-osteoblast host materials, graft and host cell survival. Prototypes that demonstrate feasibility will be further developed and optimized for Phase III testing in maxillofacial, orthopedic, and neurosurgical animal models.

 

PHASE III: Test artificial bone matrix prototypes in pre-clinical animal models of trauma for the purposes of safety and efficacy. Successful demonstration will ideally result in submission to Phase I Clinical Trials for FDA approval.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS The potential cost savings would be in excess of 500 million dollars to DoD and would effect a 30 billion dollar commercial market. The artificial bone is applicable to non-war-related wounds (trauma such as car accidents, diseases such as bone cancer) and can be used in any medical setting.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Salgado et al. 2004. Bone tissue engineering: state of the art and future trends. Macromol Biosci. 4(8):743-65.

 

2.  Meinig, R. 2010. Clinical use of resorbable polymeric membranes in the treatment of bone defects. Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 41:1.

 

3. Collagen-Hydroxyapatite Composites for Hard Tissue Repair, Eur Cells Materials, 2006, 11:43-56 (http://www.ecmjournal.org/journal/papers/vol011/pdf/v011a06.pdf)

 

4. Xie, J et al. 2004. Osteoblasts respond to hydroxyapatite surfaces with immediate changes in gene expression. J Biomed Mater Res A. 71:108-117.

 

5. Nanoceramic Matrices: Biomedical Applications, Am J Biochem Biotech 2006, 2(2): 41-48 (http://www.scipub.org/fulltext/ajbb/ajbb2241-48.pdf)

 

6.  Kalorama''s Implant-Based Dental Reconstruction: The Worldwide Dental Implant and Bone Graft Market, 2nd Edition

 

KEYWORDS: Artificial Bone; Wound Healing; IEDs; maxillofacial; orthopedic; Accelerated Recovery

 

 

 

N102-180                              TITLE: Connecting Disparate Documents Enabled by Semantic Search

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Human Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: PM IDF&D

 

OBJECTIVE: Leverage technologies that analyze documents (similarity, theme and entity discovery, etc.) to mature evidence search technologies that match against example relational evidence or Ontology-based search terms, regardless of where in an enterprise information is stored.

 

DESCRIPTION: Currently, information is collected through various ingest mechanisms, resulting in numerous text-based reports, spreadsheets, databases, images, and videos. The goal of the ISR Enterprise is to integrate these diverse data sets in order to provide the analyst/war-fighter richer situational awareness, delivered in a concise report.  In order to accomplish this, an enhanced and more automated method is needed to find specific information located in documents that are most closely related to a subject or another document.  Currently, documents can be found by key word searches, and document similarity can be addressed by theme extraction or by looking at word usage rates.  These techniques allow for document clustering, but fall short of the requirement for semantic searches.  The goal of the topic is to combine methods such as keyword, theme and proper name extraction with social network analysis metrics in order to more rigorously and accurately compute the closeness and betweenness of entities and concepts.  By representing an entire corpus of disparate information sources as a graph, related evidence can be found using standard social network metrics. Social Network Analysis concepts can be leveraged in the exploration of such linked data sets.

 

Semantic Search Technologies

When data enters into an IT-based system, it initially exists on its own, remaining unrelated to other information both internal and external to the system.  A more complete intelligence picture is formed when new information is linked to existing internal information and external sources. Automated fusion of data from various sources will assist evidence collection and entity profile formation by acting like a zipper between disparate data sets. Enterprise ontologies can be used as the basis of this capability by creating a structure by which diverse information can be related. One of the main challenges in accomplishing this task is the process of discovering what critical information remains unknown and disparate. Automatically providing greater fidelity to existing information by discovering relationships between the information will reduce the amount of time it takes to form a complete profile.

 

Social Network Analysis (SNA) techniques can assist by pro-actively monitoring changes in related information. By understanding the relationship between information, the system can incorporate new information in the right places. The result is a reduction in the amount of time it takes to relate new information. This effort looks to leverage existing document clustering techniques that both discover entities, themes and associations.  The current data classifying products act naively against new data sets, ignoring the data that has already been collected (i.e.. the previous states of entity relationships). However, adding additional information and relating it to existing information changes the graphical structure of the data (i.e.. relationships between entities and concepts). SNA metrics quantify the relationships and enable matching capability.

 

Rather than improving the field of Natural Language Processing (NLP), this effort will utilize, as much as possible, existing NLP tools that extract relational data from documents, in order to explore the possibilities of applying Social Network Analysis to such data. Further, the effort will utilize ontologies and reasoning capabilities enabled by semantic web concepts for analyzing the relationships.

 

The focus of this effort will be on evaluating the Social Network Analysis techniques applicable to linked data in an Information System, where the data collected is representative of real world events as observed by humans and sensors. Level 2 fusion, where relations between objects are established, will be relied upon to provide the necessary data structures. The effort will look to build upon Level 2 fusion (Situation Assessment) mechanisms, to further increase understanding of the information.

 

Continuously computing social network metrics against linked data will help classify entities and structures. It is then possible to compare detected structures to known social network structures. Social network theory has thus far provided us with ways of understanding community structures and roles played by individual entities given such structures. For example, knowledge flows through a community of individuals can be analyzed, and the constraints certain network structures place on information flow are known. The hypothesis of this effort is that such knowledge of social networks  can be applied to linked data in an automated collection system aggregating information from diverse sources.

 

The result of the effort is intended to be a prototype system that can perform such analysis on an on-going basis. One of the primary tasks of the effort will be researching methods of comparing structure found in data sets of linked information to existing known social network structures/signatures. The system should be able to classify entities based on their relations to other entities and present this information to the user in a meaningful way. It should be able to represent, in understandable plain language, the characteristics of entities and groups to users searching for information. The characteristics of the entities are the result of the analysis of the metrics that are continually being computed by the system. The system can, thus, perform entity classification, and report on an entity's position/role in a given network. The evidence search system, as envisioned, aims to provide a mechanism that can assist in finding relevant evidence in the absence of direct ties between clues.

 

Additionally, this effort looks to be an enabler for future research. Areas of future research include  longitudinal and multi-modal network analysis of data sets containing information gathered by both humans and automated sensors. Another area includes “what if” exploratory analysis of such networks, which can present potential scenarios to users.

 

Phase I:   Provide a proof of concept demonstration against one data store of the utility of coupling of state of the art text analytics with social network analysis metrics.  Examine and report on the technical risk of developing a real time enterprise application service.  Compare computed entity to entity and document to document closeness/betweenness with subject matter expert assessment. 

 

Phase II: Produce a prototype system that includes both real time document preprocessing and document (entity/concept) social network analysis metrics.  Demonstrate that the “accuracy” of semantic searches and the efficiency of data mining are enhanced by this method. 

 

Phase III: Mature the prototype developed under phase II while showing continued improvement against key metrics (search accuracy, data retrieval).  Support a transition to a Distributed Common Ground Station (DCGS) program of record.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL BENEFIT: The commercial market for semantic search and smart data retrieval capabilities is expanding at a rapid pace.  The development of a tool that can automatically and correctly retrieve relevant related information from documents has both military and commercial value.

 

REFERENCES:

1. M. Girvan and M. E. J Newman, “Community structure in social and biological networks,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 99, no. 12 (2002): 7821-7826.

 

2. Bettina Hoser et al., “Semantic Network Analysis of Ontologies,” in The Semantic Web: Research and Applications, vol. 4011, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2006), 514-529.

 

3. Xiang Zhang, Gong Cheng, and Yuzhong Qu, “Ontology summarization based on rdf sentence graph,” Proceedings of the 16th international conference on World Wide Web (2007): 707-716.

 

4. R. Lempel and S. Moran, “The stochastic approach for link-structure analysis (SALSA) and the TKC effect,” Computer Networks 33, no. 1-6 (June 2000): 387-401.

 

5. Heiner Stuckenschmidt, “Network Analysis as a Basis for Partitioning Class Hierarchies.,” in Proceedings of the ISWC 2005 Workshop on Semantic Network Analysis, vol. 171 (presented at the SNA 2005 Semantic Network Analysis, Galway, Ireland, 2005), 43-54.

 

6. Silvio Peroni, Enrico Motta, and Mathieu d’Aquin, “Identifying Key Concepts in an Ontology, through the Integration of Cognitive Principles with Statistical and Topological Measures,” in The Semantic Web, vol. 5367, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 0302-9743 (Print) 1611-3349 (Online) (Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2008), 242-256.

 

7. Styliani Kleanthous and Vania Dimitrova, “Modelling Semantic Relationships and Centrality to Facilitate Community Knowledge Sharing,” in Adaptive Hypermedia and Adaptive Web-Based Systems, vol. 5149, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2008), 123-132.

 

8. D.V. Kalashnikov et al., “Web People Search via Connection Analysis,” Knowledge and Data Engineering, IEEE Transactions on 20, no. 11 (November 2008): 1550-1565.

 

KEYWORDS: semantic; social network analysis; search; closeness; clustering; information

 

 

 

N102-181                              TITLE: Acoustic Vector Projector Technology

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes, Sensors, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Forward Sector Torpedo Defense Enabling Capability for POM12

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop, fabricate, and demonstrate a very compact high powered underwater sonar transducer array capable of directional transmissions at high duty cycle operation, very high reliability, and a low manufacturing cost.

 

DESCRIPTION: The performance of naval systems for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Counter-Torpedo Detection, Classification, and Localization (CTDCL) is limited by the size, power and detection range of current sensor systems. Although current sensors are adequate for current missions, emerging missions and the need for reducing the volume and weight of sonar transducer arrays while improving reliability under high duty cycle conditions prompts the need for the development of innovative very high power, broadband, directional transmitting arrays while reducing the size and weight compared to traditional transducer arrays. The utilization of projector driver materials that can withstand heat extremes and are very durable and have low material sound velocity (to reduce the size of the transducer) will permit the design of highly compact projector arrays that can generate transmit beams that can be electrically steered.

 

PHASE I:  Identify active driver materials which, when combined with appropriate device design, are able to produce high power, broadband, directional sound transmission at high duty cycle and pulse duration. Develop a model or metric as a means to rank potential active drive materials and innovative transduction mechanisms that can be used in this development. Assess the effects of the combination of high duty cycle and long-term reliability upon the transducer driver materials and the various electrical wires, elastomeric compounds and epoxies that would comprise the final device. Assess the impact of environmental effects on the driver materials under consideration to predict ruggedness and long-term degradation. Undertake analyses (using analytical or numerical models) to determine acoustic performance and integrate in potential long-term performance changes as a result of high duty cycle operation in a continuous manner over multiple years of in-service use.  Determine the best material/device combination, analyze and identify possible shortfalls in both drive materials and device mechanisms (laying out a development path to remediate the identified shortcomings) and then perform thermal analysis to assess the need for ancillary thermal control schemes to insure reliable operation. If additional thermal dissipation is needed, integrate the components into the model used to predict service life and reliability. Construct a notional paper design for the selected concept and perform analyses to quantify performance.

 

PHASE II: Complete the design of the transducer and array and fabricate prototypes for validation of predicted behavior. After tests of prototype devices, fabricate a full prototype array. This work may become classified in Phase II.

 

PHASE III: Undertake engineering analysis of the prototype array to improve the acoustic performance and to apply cost-effective manufacturing techniques as a means to lower total system cost. Design, develop and demonstrate additional prototype arrays at-sea and on Naval vessels for specific applications. Integrate the transducer array with efficient and compact power amplifiers and demonstrate a complete transmit subsystem. The the appropriate technical and programmatic steps to effect a transition into a program of record.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: This technology will have a host of applications in commercial underwater imaging and fish finding applications.

 

REFERENCES:

1. S.C. Butler and Julie Slaughter, "Vector Projector - A Unidirectional, Magnetostrictive, Compact Sonar Transducer Design", NUWC-NPT Technical Report 11.918, Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, RI, 1 July 2009 (Unclassified)

 

2. C.H. Sherman and J.L. Butler, "Transducers and Arrays for Underwater Sound", Springer (2007)

 

3. J.L. Butler, A.L. Butler and J.A. Rice, "A tri-modal directional transducer", J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 115 (2), pp. 658-665 (February 2004)

 

4. S.C. Butler, "High Frequency Broadband Projector (HFBBP): Wideband Projector Design and Test Results", NUWC-NPT Technical Memo 08-061, 29 August 2008, Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, RI (Unclassified)

 

5. A.D. Waite, "Sonar for Practising Engineers", Wiley (2002)

 

6. J.L. Butler, "Modal Acoustic Array Transducer Apparatus", U.S. Patent 7,372,776 B2 (13 May 2008)

 

KEYWORDS: transducer; vector projector; directional beams; array; high power; reliable

 

 

 

N102-182                              TITLE: Compact, lightweight Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) with robust

navigation and range for riverine reconnaissance

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Sensors, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Oceanographer of the Navy, PMS-NSW or PMS-403; Organic Mine Countermeasures

 

Rationale:  Naval Special Warfare presently uses the SAHRV AUV for a variety of survey missions.  Their utilities are however substantially limited in the riverine environments.  Persistent directional currents in rivers severely limit useful reconnaissance range of the SAHRV AUVs.  Their dependence on GPS limits their navigation and mapping capabilities in riverine areas with heavy overhanging vegetations and canopies.  Their size and weight also makes it difficulty for deployment from small riverine surface crafts. A smaller, light weight vehicle capable of traversing against river currents may be more useful for a variety of missions, including riverine ones, and consideration of commercially available AUVs developed with private investment is warranted. Advantages would include ease of operations from small surface crafts, expansion of mission areas including far upstream of rivers and heavily vegetated areas. Industry support for overlapping requirements and introduction of vendor-independent software through non-proprietary APIs provide these benefits.

 

OBJECTIVE: Design and develop compact, lightweight AUV capable of riverine bathymetric SLAM and current surveys along river stream while navigating under vegetation canopy causing intermittent GPS and RF availability.  The AUV shall be capable of transiting against river currents, which may be highly variable, for an extended period of time.  Notional requirements are: weight less than 10 lbs and near neutrally buoyant; range greater than 30 miles upstream from a launching point; navigation and mapping error sufficiently low to ensure safe high-speed transit of follow-on surface craft.

 

DESCRIPTION: Forces operating in shallow riverine environment require knowledge of river bathymetry and currents for safe and rapid transit.  In many riverine environments of interest, overhead access to the waterway is partially or completely occluded by foliage, and such traditional airborne reconnaissance assets as manned aerial platforms, unmanned air systems (UASs), or satellites are unable to provide suitable route planning information including bathymetry to support riverine missions.  For such environments, there is a need for AUVs that are capable of navigating with limited GPS, and capable of swimming against river currents for an extended range.  There are a number of AUVs deployed operationally for various MCM missions; however, all rely on GPS availability to navigate. Furthermore, no available small AUVs are capable of operating against river currents for an extended period.  To be deployable by operating forces using small riverine surface craft, the vehicle has to be compact and light weight.  Innovation is required to achieve the necessary navigation accuracies and environmental mapping capabilities, including SLAM and control algorithms, hull form design, efficient use of propulsion and new power source, among others.  Concepts and capabilities are solicited that provide a compact, light-weight AUV capable of providing maps of bathymetry and surface current far upstream from the launch point.

 

PHASE I: Bathymetric SLAM, navigation, propulsion, control, and hull-form design, associated concepts and algorithms, and an integrated system design should be proposed to achieve the objective requirements.  Component level and system level modeling and analyses are to be conducted to justify the proposed design.  The design analyses should focus on feasibility of new proposed concepts of component/software integration for higher overall system performance.

 

PHASE II: A prototype will be produced and fully demonstrated in Phase II.  Test and analysis will document AUV performance with respect to the stated objectives as well as performance limitations in laboratory and operationally realistic environments.

 

PHASE III: Proposer will develop an acquisition-ready AUV system description that meets well defined navigation and safe operation guidelines. Full manufacturing documentation will allow rapid production to occur with the vendor team.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Commercial production and distribution of man-portable AUVs parallels Navy interests. Primary applications in the near-term will address environmental baselining, monitoring, and change detection seasonally and in response to incremental or episodic events. Communities, ports, and resource management entities are likely the first customers, and their requirements for navigation accuracy, safe operation, and economical updates will be similar to the Navy requirements.

 

REFERENCES:

1) The Navy Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (UUV) Master Plan, 2004: (http://www.navy.mil/navydata/technology/uuvmp.pdf)

 

2) Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations: Naval Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2005: (http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11379)

 

KEYWORDS: UUV; navigation; man-portable; unmanned undersea vehicle; bathymetry; SLAM

 

 

 

N102-183                              TITLE: Scalable Dynamic Matrix Completion for Information Processing and Link

Discovery

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Sensors, Battlespace

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop mathematical, computational, modeling and visualization tools to address the problem of recovering an unknown matrix from a small fraction of its entries. Demonstrate effectiveness of technical approach for (i) Predictive analytics for defense and intelligence communication networks; (ii) Processing of high dimensional sensor data; and (iii) Sensor scheduling.

 

DESCRIPTION: Matrix completion concerns the problem of recovering an unknown matrix from a small fraction of its entries. It arises in great numbers of important applications and, not surprisingly, has a long history in mathematics. In general, accurate recovery of a matrix from a small number of entries is impossible; but the knowledge that the unknown matrix has low rank radically changes this premise. While solving the matrix completion problem remains of great interest to mathematicians, progress has been incremental. Recent mathematical advances that have arisen from the intensive study of compressive sensing / sampling (CS) are now providing promising new insights [1]. In particular, extensive theoretical and algorithmic studies of signal reconstruction using CS techniques have resulted in the development of rigorous mathematical bounds, a variety of optimization results and computationally efficient algorithms.

 

Commercial interests currently dominate applied matrix completion research, most famously as a proposed entry for the Netflix prize, and the analysis of internet networks for combating malicious attacks. These predictive analytics problems have close analogs in defense and intelligence communication networks. For example, the intelligence community is keenly interested in link discovery for disrupting incipient, static and evolving terrorist networks. The defense community is concerned with their increasingly vulnerability to the infiltration of communication and sensor networks. Matrix completion mathematics might also be integrated with classes of information theoretic signal processing algorithms which are rapidly moving from a purely academic setting to being evaluated against tactical sensor data. The connection can be seen by noting that a related problem is the distance geometry problem of realizing points in a Euclidean space from a given subset of their pairwise distances [2].  Dynamic matrix completion is a promising new line of research that extends the matrix completion problem to the case where one has the ability to (selectively) fill in a few additional matrix elements to improve the quality of the reconstructed matrix.

 

PHASE I: Develop mathematical framework and first-generation algorithms for integrating matrix completion methodology with chosen graph-based object detection algorithm (e.g., ISOMAP [3], LLE [4], Laplacian Eigenmaps [5], or Diffusion Maps [6]). Evaluate algorithm performance against sample data set. Propose a plan for the detailed experimental validation of the methodology.

 

PHASE II: Expand Phase I class of signal processing algorithm to cover anomaly detection, object classification and sensor fusion. Complete and experimentally validate the approach developed in Phase I (expanded to include classification and fusion) by measuring performance against several representative data sets (e.g., a few target classes and two sensor modalities).  Develop preliminary mathematical analyses and algorithms to extend the Phase I methodology to include dynamical matrix completion techniques to enable sensor scheduling. Deliver the complete, validated system to ONR.

 

PHASE III: Commercialization of a validated and verified approach for matrix completion that is scalable and dynamic will enable improved analysis of mobile ad hoc networks. As well, a robust scalable matrix completion algorithm adapted for anomaly detection, object classification and information fusion will find use in a wide range of commercial applications.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The following industries will benefit from the product developed under this SBIR topic: informatics, data mining, array signal processing, biomedicine, biotechnology, video surveillance, communications devices, networking and management.

 

REFERENCES:

[1] E. J. Candès and T. Tao, “The power of convex relaxation: Near-optimal matrix completion,” submitted for publication, 2009.

 

[2] A. Singer and M. Cucuringu, “Uniqueness of Low-Rank Matrix Completion by Rigidity Theory,” submitted for publication, 2009.

 

[3] J. B. Tenenbaum, V. de Silva, and J. C. Langford, “A Global Geometric Framework for Nonlinear

102:7432-7437 imensionality Reduction,” Science,  pp.  2319-2323,  2000.

 

[4] S. T. Roweis, et al., Nonlinear Dimensionality Reduction by Locally Linear Embedding, Science,  pp.  2323-2326,  2000.

 

[5] M. Belkin, and P. Niyogi, “Laplacian Eigenmaps for Dimensionality Reduction and Data Representation,” Neural Computation,  Vol. 15,  6, pp. 1373-1396, 2003.

 

[6] R. R. Coifman, S. Lafon, A. B. Lee, M. Maggioni, B. Nadler, F. Warner, and S. W. Zucker, “Geometric diffusions as a tool for harmonic analysis and structure definition of data: Multiscale methods,” PNAS, 102, 7432-7437 2005.

 

[7] J. Wright, A. Ganesh, S. rao, Y. Ma, "Robust Principal Component Analysis: Exact Recovery of Corrupted Low-Rank Matrices via Convex Optimization", submitted for publication, 2009.

 

KEYWORDS: Graph Processing; Data Adaptive Processing; Information Assurance; Information Operations.

 

 

 

N102-184                              TITLE: Isolation Techniques for Untrusted Software

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: JPEO JTRS ACAT I

 

OBJECTIVE:  Develop technique(s) to protect an embedded computing platform from malware contained in a large open source or commercial software package.  The protection shall be achieved without adversely impacting either the performance or resource usage of the computational platform.  The technique(s) should not require specialized hardware devices or architecture, as it is desired to provide enhanced security to fielded platforms.

 

DESCRIPTION:  Open source software has rapidly advanced information collaboration and sharing.  Even commercial software packages can contain open source or other software of unknown trust.  It would be cost-prohibitive to replicate the functionality provided by millions of lines of untrusted software.  (Consider trustworthiness in this context to include security, privacy, reliability, and safety.)  Execution of this software on private, commercial, and government computing platforms represents risk because there is potential for malware to be clandestinely hidden within these large software compositions.  The malware's impact can range from denial of service of the application and other users of computing platform to covert transmissions and receptions of the network connected to the computing platform.  The more malicious malware can jeopardize the integrity of users and any applications on the computing platform or possibly even those connected via the network. Research has been done for type-safe programming which allows for fine grained data sharing on Java but is not applicable to C/C++ code.

 

The goal is to provide isolation between the untrusted software and other applications executing upon the host computing platform.  Current technology includes secure partitioning, provided natively through the operating system or a hypervisor.  This provides adequate containment of an application although trusted data guards must be provided to the partitions containing untrusted software. Other technologies offer isolation of applications from the operating system but does not provide multiple level of security needed by more advanced computing platforms. Techniques which use the substitution of a completely new operating system or separation kernel are not desirable as it often entails cost and schedule over runs.

 

Another possibility is a virtual machine executing upon the native operating system to provide isolation and security for untrusted software.  Although perhaps more costly in computing resources, it might have advantages for retrofitting existing platforms with increased computational security.  Other approaches are possible as well and should be evaluated.

 

PHASE I:  Current computer security technology does not provided for proper hosting of untrusted software.  Propose strategies and techniques to protect computing platform resources from undesired or malicious behavior.  Provide mathematical model and simulate the protection of the proposed isolation product as well as portability of the product. If secure partitions are identified as part of the isolation technique, document strategies for construction and implementations of data guards between partitions.

 

PHASE II:  Create a software test bench for demonstration of the isolation product.  Prototype the isolation product and deploy it on the test bench.  Demonstrate the performance of the isolation product with a large open source project such as the Apache web server.  An independent test organization should be contracted to test isolation by introducing malware into the open source software.  Prepare a final report detailing the test results and the merits of the isolation techniques.

 

PHASE III:  Refine the isolation product based upon testing results from Phase II.  If enhancements require hardware implementation, collaborate with a hardware manufacturer for inclusion of the new features into the platform or processing unit.  If the techniques involve software-based isolation, formalize a software product providing these new capabilities.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: 

Almost every computing platform in private households, including electronic book readers, cell phones, etc., incorporate some untrusted software.  Protection of the computing platform and its resources is a fundamental security issue for private citizens and local governments.

 

REFERENCES:

(1) James F. Mason, Kenn R. Luecke and Jahn A. Luke Device drivers in time and space partitioned operating systems, MILCOM 2008 - IEEE Military Communications Conference, vol. 27, no. 1, November 2008, pp. 1180 – 1186.

 

(2) Thomas H. Morris and V. S. S. Nair Secure context switch for private computing on public platforms, GLOBECOM 2008 - IEEE Global Telecommunications Conference, vol. 27, no. 1, November 2008, pp. 2159 – 2163.

 

(3) Dilip Krishnaswamy, Robert N. Hasbun and John P. Brizek Secure manageable mobile handset platform architectures, IEEE Communications Magazine, vol. 44, no. 9, September 2006, pp. 158 - 165

 

(4) Umesh Shankar and David Wagner Preventing secret leakage from fork(): Securing privilege-separated applications, ICC 2006 - IEEE International Conference on Communications, no. 1, June 2006, pp. 2253 – 2260.

 

(5) David C. Vallese Guidelines for reference monitors in embedded INFOSEC applications, MILCOM 2007 - IEEE Military Communications Conference, no. 1, October 2007, pp. 482 – 488.

 

KEYWORDS: software isolation; separation kernel; software security; software; JTRS

 

 

 

N102-185                              TITLE: HUMINT-> Multi-INT Fusion Tool (HMFT)

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Sensors, Battlespace

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: USN PEO C4I--PMW-120 DCGS-N (Distributed Command Ground System-Navy) ACAT 1

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop an affordable, easy-to-use web-based tool and framework that can support the fusion of HUMINT with other intelligence sources to support Navy intelligence analysts afloat and ashore.

 

DESCRIPTION: The importance of HUMINT in our current operations in Iraq and Afghanistan in support of counter-insurgency operations has demonstrated a capability gap for USN ISR&T tools, which is the lack of a comprehensive, end-to-end automated analytical tool and architecture to support the fusion of HUMINT to other intelligence sources (specifically: national/tactical/technical collection system ISR data) to help Navy intelligence analysts afloat/ashore to maximize utility of HUMINT and other intelligence data to support targeting. 

 

Note: One of the capability gaps discovered in the DCGS-N Inc 2 effort is the need for more robust HUMINT tools that support multi-INT fusion and targeting.  In fact, in the DCGS-N Inc 1 Exploitation Suite, there isn’t a dedicated “HUMINT” fusion tool.

 

The Navy seeks an innovative and creative approach in providing a HUMINT-> Multi-INIT Fusion Tool and Architecture that can be rapidly transition to operational platforms and Programs of Record (POR) in days.  Transition of the proposed approach requires software to be based on a loosely-coupled Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) compatible with modern real time web applications.  The proposed solution must be able to function effectively with all forms of HUMINT and ISR data and must support fusion beyond just overlaying HUMINT reports on a geospatial referenced map with other ISR data.

 

PHASE I: Identify, Develop algorithms, design software services, and/or design architectures to accomplish the following:

• Collection of HUMINT data and support automated textual entity extraction.

• Identify existing SOA services supporting query/retrieval of intelligence data from various intelligence data sources

• Develop a prototype tool that illustrate the power/value added of fusing HUMINT intelligence reports to national and tactical ISR data in a specific place and time.

• Describe how the software design supports integration with emerging modern Service Oriented Architectures (SOA).

•  Develop a fusion architecture of SIGINT (COMINT Externals), FMV-UAV and MTI data---and use HUMINT as a tipping source.

 

PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate algorithm prototype software services  based on the design work performed in Phase I. Demonstrate these services in a laboratory or field test environment.  Demonstrate the “value-added” aspect of an automated fusion tool with HUMINT, SIGINT (COMINT from RTRG), FMV, and MTI data.

 

PHASE III: Transition this capability into the DCGS-N POR and integrate with imagery/targeting tool (e.g. CGS/PTW)—and thus provide a capability that supports discovery -> analysis -> targeting.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Department of Homeland Security (DHS), US Coast Guard, and Federal Law Enforcement community, and  greater Counter-Terrorism community that are wrestling with how to fuse HUMINT/Law Enforcement data with national/tactical/technical collection system ISR data.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Joint Publication 2.0 Joint Intelligence http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/new_pubs/jp2_0.pdf

 

2. Joint Publication 2-01.3 Joint Intelligence Preparation of the Operational Environment

http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/new_pubs/jp2_01_3.pdf

 

3. Joint Publication 1-02 Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/new_pubs/jp1_02.pdf

NAVNETWARCOM Multi-Int Fusion Requirements document (DRAFT) - available on SIPRNET

 

KEYWORDS: HUMINT; Multi-INT; Fusion; ISR;ISR&T; intelligence

 

 

 

 

N102-186                              TITLE: Wideband Low-loss Tunable Band-Pass Filter (BPF)

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Materials/Processes, Sensors, Electronics

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: JPEO JTRS ACAT I

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop wideband tunable BPF with unprecedented low insertion loss for small form-factor military transceivers designed to operate in the VHF and UHF bands.

 

DESCRIPTION: Some military SDR systems are specified to operate over an extremely large bandwidth (20MHz-2GHz+) while transmitting and receiving simultaneously on a shared antenna system.  To accomplish this simultaneous operation without interference, these wideband SDR systems typically employ several filters in the signal chain after the power amplifier to prevent the transmitter from desensitizing or jamming the receiver.  The losses of these filters and associated switches must be compensated for with additional power delivered by the power amplifier. For small form-factor SDR transceivers, this extra power (essentially all of which must be dissipated as wasted heat) has negative consequences for system reliability, cost, size, battery life and thermal dissipation.  Small form-factor tunable filter technologies with potential to address this problem have been developed and commercialized, but these products are inadequate for many military SDR applications in their current state of evolution because they do not significantly improve the insertion loss characteristics as compared to those of the fixed-tuned BPF they would replace. Additionally, other promising technologies lack the power handling capability necessary for this application.  This SBIR will focus on the definition and development of tunable BPF technologies that are broadband, low-loss, and centered around a  small form-factor to maximize their utility for military SDR systems. 

 

PHASE I: Design a continuously tunable BPF from 20MHz – 1GHz with a 10 percent 3dB bandwidth and insertion loss of 1dB or less across the entire band. Demonstrate that the filter can be fabricated in a volume not exceeding 25 cubic centimeters and with power consumption not exceeding 500mW. 

 

PHASE II: Based on Phase I results, fabricate the prototype tunable BPF, characterize its performance over the design bandwidth and demonstrate that it meets proposed requirements for insertion loss, volume and power consumption.

 

PHASE III: Phase III work would involve transitioning a successful prototype tunable BPF to manufacturing.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Successful development of wideband low-loss tunable BPF  has the potential to benefit DoD and commercial market segments alike.  DoD applications that could benefit from this technology include communications, navigation and electronic warfare systems. Commercial applications include wireless communications systems (handsets).

 

REFERENCES:

1.  Manas Roy, Robert J. Ward, and J.A. Higgins, “SiC Varactor based Tunable Filters with Enhanced Linearity”, Silicon Monolithic Integrated Circuits in RF Systems, 2008. SiRF 2008. IEEE Topical Meeting, 23-25 Jan. 2008, page(s):163 – 166, Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/SMIC.2008.47.

 

2.  Paratek Microwave URL (http://www.paratek.com/)

 

3. Agile RF URL (http://www.agilerf.com/)

 

4.  Pole Zero URL (http://www.polezero.com/)

 

5. USPTO Patent Application 20090002915, Micro-electromechanical voltage tunable capacitor and filter devices.

 

KEYWORDS: Tunable band-pass filter; tunable filter; hopping filter; low-loss filter; co-site filter; electronically tunable filter.

 

 

 

N102-187                              TITLE: Spectrum Fragmentation of Networking Waveforms with Distributed Network

Control

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: JPEO JTRS ACAT I

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Define candidate distributed algorithms and protocols for the physical, MAC and network layers in a mobile non-centralized network environment for fragmenting single-carrier modulation spectra into multiple non-contiguous mini-bands in response to regulations on bandwidth limits and spectrum unavailability as well as to local time-varying spectrum disturbances.

 

DESCRIPTION: Military Mobile Ad-hoc Networks (MANETs) such as Soldier radio Waveform (SRW), faced with the realities of decreasing electromagnetic spectrum availability both in the US and overseas, now need to address how to respond to and operate within these restrictions, as well as be able to adapt to locally encountered electromagnetic disturbances such as interference or multipath fading.  To address the narrowing bandwidth challenge, MANETs have the option to reduce the data rate (or increase the modulation efficiency) to the point of satisfying new narrow bandwidth restrictions. Another solution would be to multiplex the modulation and break the spectrum into from 1 to N mini- bands each of which satisfies the BW limit and availability constraints, and whose aggregate throughput goes from 1/N to 1 of the single channel equivalent, depending on how many mini-bands were available.  In wireless MANET networks when channel sensing technology becomes available, this capability will then need to be adaptive, so spectrum fragmentation will demand new protocols for distributing the channel and data rate allocation control among the network members. Commercial (centralized) wireless systems with base stations have a distinct advantage over decentralized control networks without infrastructure in adaptively controlling subscriber terminals.  Moreover, IEEE continues to develop protocols addressing networks with less infra-structure and decentralized control such as in 802.16 (ref 1 & 2). However the problems of distributed network control for MANET networks continues to be an area that is not well known. Some prior solutions for decentralized control of GSM networks (ref 3) have been studied that may be useful in analyzing this problem with respect to the SRW.

 

Because of the immediate pressing need for more spectrum flexibility to aid the spectrum authorization process, even a static solution without dynamic control will greatly increase the utility of SRW by making it possible to license in regions where it otherwise might be prohibited. Looking forward, spectrum sensing and dynamic spectrum access technologies are expected to be significant enablers of commercial and military wireless networks. The research requested here is intended to look at how spectrum fragmentation can be incorporated in the near term, and then to look at strategies that can solve electromagnetic problems, and how that strategy/algorithm can be shared and distributed in a non-centralized network. Some of the methods and protocols for this may be equally applicable to other MANETs such as WNW.

 

PHASE I: 1) Establish a state of art baseline in spectrum fragmentation and adaptive net control technology, referring to the IEEE standards 802.16 (ref 1 and 2) standards as a minimum.

2) Synthesize candidate spectrum reshaping (fragmentation) approaches in response to bandwidth shaping commands to convert single modulated carriers with unimodal spectra into multiple non-contiguous unimodal mini-bands spread over a region of spectrum wider than the original carrier, where the sum of the mini-bandwidths do not exceed the original bandwidth. The solution should consist of cross-layer sub-band allocations, and channel multiplexing paradigms involving SIS, MAC, and Link layers.  Assuming a MANET non-centralized network, for the identified approaches, synthesize allocation strategies when a pool of defined narrowband channels is made available (as opposed to being pre-assigned) requiring network wide control and information dissemination.

3) Using simulations provide performance data and discuss ease of implementation and compatibility with Mobile Ad-hoc Networking Waveforms and Software Defined radio architectures. Evaluate and rank the candidates in terms of performance benefit, ease of implementation and compatibility with MANETs.

 

PHASE II: Develop, demonstrate and validate Phase I selected candidate algorithms and protocols. Generate a technology insertion plan for insertion into SRW. Build a test environment to demonstrate the recommended solutions including their network behavior for stressing environments appropriate to exercise the solutions. Update the net convergence and stability properties of the algorithms based on testing if necessary.

 

PHASE III: Transition the implementation to the JTRS software environment, insert into SRW and perform development tests. Phase III will be Software Communication Architecture (SCA) compliant and also incorporate JTRS APIs as an application software package for JTRS sets. In addition, the software generated in this project is planned to be incorporated into the JTRS Enterprise Business Model, which allows JTRS vendors to utilize common software.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The techniques developed as part of this SBIR will greatly facilitate spectrum approvals of SRW with implications to WNW in the US and overseas in regards to wideband networking waveform licensing while the new protocols for distributed control developed here will also have applications to commercial wireless systems and extensions IEEE standards.

 

REFERENCES:

1. IEEE Standard 802.16d -2004

 

2. IEEE Standard 802.16e-2005

 

3. Implementation of a Low Cost Wireless Distributed Control System using GSM Network, Ganegedara, K.M.T.N, Jayalath, J.A. R.C., Kumara, K.M.K, Pandithage, D.N.U., Samaranayake, B.G.L.T., Ekanayake, E.M.N., Alahakoon, A.M.U.S.K., Industrial and Information Systems, 2008, ICIIS 2008, IEEE Region 10 and the Third International Conference on 8-10 Dec., 2008, pp 1-6.

 

KEYWORDS: wireless networks, distributed control, JTRS-SRW, spectrum fragmentation, adaptive, spectrum authorization

 

 

 

N102-188                              TITLE: Network Manager Capability Enhancement

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: JPEO JTRS ACAT I

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE:  Develop innovative techniques for network planning, management automation, and simulation that will aid the network planner in development and optimization of the overall mobile network configuration.  Techniques developed should automate the input of network management parameters and automatically adapt/change them to optimize network performance as the Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) changes due to environmental, interference, and battle effect factors.

 

DESCRIPTION:   The advancement in wireless communication technology has led to the design and development of mobile networks.  However automated and optimal mobile ad-hoc network planning and maintenance including frequency management, IP planning, configuration parameter setting, and updates based on current topology and environment, presents significant challenges.  The purpose of this SBIR is to develop advanced concepts and tools for network automation and simulation that will eventually aide the network planner in developing the overall mobile network configuration, ground and airborne, and continually optimize it..  The network automation and simulator will be configured to run, in the background, on a continual basis so that as the network continues to automatically optimize based on changing topology and conditions.

 

Phase I:  Perform research, and development of innovative techniques for implementing network configuration automation, simulation, and optimization of network management for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks.. Techniques should enhance automated intitial entry and then allow automated, optimum reconfiguration of network management parameters as the topology of the MANET changes in the battlefield.  The objective is to dynamically improve the MANET performance through changes to network management configuration parameters as topology and link state changes are encountered due to interference, propagation effects, node mobility, spectrum availability, and changes or loss of nodes due to battle effects.  The techniques should enhance configuration of the network including IP addressing, dynamic frequency assignments, and subnet control. The techniques should optimize the network configuration and ensure a high level of Quality of Service (QoS) for the many scenarios, environments, and deployments to be optimized while taking advantage of communications, networking, propagation, and other modeling and simulation tools running in the background on the Network Manager . Determine and use methods of modeling and simulation which will demonstrate the proposed enhancements. 

 

Phase II:  Develop, test and demonstrate the network configuration automation and simulator tool.  The techniques developed in Phase I should be developed to the point that its concepts can be tested and demonstrated in a relevant modeling and simulation environment.  The techniques developed should be demonstrated in a realistic M&S environment to show improvement to the QoS of WNW.

 

Phase III:  Integrate the tested capability into the JWNM and/or JTRS Enterprise Network Manager (JENM), depending on the time this SBIR reaches Phase III.  This effort will include integration, test and documentation of the capability.  Demonstrate the improvements to WNW network QoS using the new techniques on JTRS Hardware. Apply the concepts to emerging commercial mobile and mobile ad hoc network planning and optimization.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Wireless network technology is not only limited to the military/JTRS.  Commercial wireless network providers are constantly looking to optimize the use of their resources and spectrum.  Using a network configuration automation and simulator tool similar to that describe in this SBIR would greatly benefit them as well.  

 

REFERENCES:

1. T. Ye, D. Harrison, B. Mo, S. Kalyanaraman, B. Szymanski, K. Vastola, B. Skidar, and H. Kaur, ”Traffic management and network control using collaborative on-line simulations,” in International Conference on Communication, ICC2001, Helsinki, Finland, June 2001.

 

2. X. Zeng, R. Bagrodia, and M. Gerla, “Glomosim: a library for parallel simulation of large-scale wireless networks,” in 12th Workshop on Parallel and Distributed Simulations, Banff, Alberta, Canda, May 1998.

 

3. L. A. Law and M.G. McComas, “Simulation of software for communication networks: the state of the art,” IEEE Communications Magazine, vol. 32, pp. 44-50, 1994.

 

4. NED/JWNM overview located on the JPEO JTRS website, http://jpeojtrs.mil/files/domains/09_NED_AFCEA_Brief_V6.pdf.

 

KEYWORDS: Network Management, Network Simulator, Network Performance, Network Parameter Tuning, MANET, Wireless Networks, Airborne Network Management, Optimal Deployment, Mission Planning

 

 

 

N102-189                              TITLE: Advanced Reconfigurable Communications Components

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Space Platforms

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Mobile User Objective System (MUOS), ACAT I

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop space-qualified, radiation tolerant, advanced reconfigurable communications components for satellite communications (SATCOM) systems.

 

DESCRIPTION: Currently satellite systems are built in seven to ten years and allow little, if any, ability to reconfigure resources.  This results in operational systems built to ten year old requirements and are not flexible.  It is desirable for space systems to become increasingly reconfigurable and reprogramable. Examples of recent innovations are Radiation hardened Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), Software Defined Radios (SDR), and other reconfigurable payloads that have been proved in space and continue to improve in performance and reliability.  These advances will soon allow for in-space reconfiguration and re-tasking of satellites and ground stations, a concept that PEO Space Systems calls Software Reconfigurable Payloads (SRP). 

 

Advanced communication satellites require a programmable, sampled intermediate frequency (SIF) filter to replace several traditional off-chip IF filters.  This includes the necessity of low power and small form factor for analog/digital conversion and digital processing.  The SIF filter should display extremely small size, weight, and power, yet provide a high level of reliable performance.

 

The environmental requirements include immunity to destructive single event latchup (SEL), and total ionizing dose tolerance in the 100 krad (Si) or greater range. Single event effects, including single event functional interrupt, should also be considered, although single event upset may also be masked at the system architecture level if upset rates are manageable. Tolerance to even higher radiation levels is desirable, if a reasonable size, weight, and power is maintained. Increasing temperature tolerance up to the Mil-Spec temperature range (-55 to 125C) is desirable. Reliability for long-term space geosynchronous missions must be addressed.

 

Offerers should not hesitate to propose approaches other than the one laid out in the Phase I and Phase II descriptions below, but should be prepared to explain clearly how their approach will achieve the desired outcome. Since the desired outcome of this project is a commercially available SIF filter, the proposer must be able to show a plausible path to designing, producing, testing, qualifying, and marketing a space qualified product.

 

PHASE I: Demonstrate through analysis and modeling that key technology developments or adaptations can achieve requirements and enhance capability for space-based communications systems.  Additionally, analysis of should be completed.

 

PHASE II: Implement the new design and demonstrate its performance against expectations.  Evaluate measured performance characteristics versus expectations and make design/process adjustments as necessary.

 

PHASE III: This phase will focus on further testing and integrating the technology with existing military SATCOM systems such as the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS).

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Commercial opportunities include software defined radio (SDR) applications, such as any new or NASA space communications systems that require block or direct down conversion SDR topology.   Commercial applications include telecommunications space systems such as future satellite-based cellular phone networks.

 

REFERENCES:

1)  "Common Operators Design on Dynamically Reconfigurable Hardware for SDR Systems" Loïg Godard, Hongzhi Wang, Christophe Moy, Pierre Leray SDR Forum Technical Conference 2007

 

KEYWORDS: Software Defined Radio; Space Qualified; Communications; Filter

 

 

 

N102-190                              TITLE: Multipaction Mitigation

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Sensors, Electronics, Space Platforms

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Mobile User Objective System (MUOS), ACAT I

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop new passive and active multipaction mitigation technologies that can be incorporated into conventional and advanced satellite communication system payloads.

 

DESCRIPTION: Multipaction, or multiple impaction, is an electron resonance effect that occurs when Radio Frequency (RF) fields accelerate electrons in a vacuum and cause them to impact a surface releasing one or more electrons into the vacuum.  These electrons can then be accelerated and impact the same or another surface.  When the impact energies, number of electrons released, and timing of the impacts results in a sustained multiplication of a number of electrons, the phenomenon grows exponentially resulting in operational impairments and potentially physical damage.

 

In RF space systems, multipaction can cause loss and distortion of the RF signal (increase of noise figure or bit-error-rate) and can damage RF components or subsystems due to excess RF power being reflected back or dissipated by them.

 

Design rules, RF design tools such as the European Space Agency’s Multipactor Calculator, and test methods provide ways to achieve design margins that preclude the onset of multipaction.  However, these approaches can result in restrictive device geometries and reduce RF power levels.

 

The development of new passive and active multipaction mitigation technologies that can be incorporated into conventional and advanced satellite communication system payload designs could potentially allow multipaction free operation of more compact device geometries and higher RF power levels.

 

Passive multipaction mitigation technologies might take the form of coatings or other surface treatments that inhibit the release of electrons from potential multipaction generating impacts while retaining the desired spacecraft surface properties of emissivity and thermal conductivity.

 

Active multipaction mitigation technologies might take the form of steady or slowly varying magnetic fields used to inhibit or disrupt the onset of multipaction.  Since the force experienced by a charge moving in a magnetic field is perpendicular to its velocity vector ( F = V x  B), charges being accelerated by an RF field toward a surface can be deflected to travel in circular or spiral paths avoiding surface impacts and the generation of secondary electrons required for multipaction phenomenon to occur.

 

PHASE I: Develop a new passive and/or active multipaction mitigation technology concept(s) with analytical or numerical calculations to establish performance possibilities.  Translate design concepts into a product development roadmap establishing a technical and program pathway to an operational capability demonstration.

 

Tasks under this phase could include:

• Develop new passive and/or active multipaction mitigation technology concepts

• Predict performance parameters for multipaction mitigation technologies

• Produce a point design for demonstration test articles

 

PHASE II: Produce and test developmental test articles incorporating the multipaction mitigation technologies in a thermal vacuum test environment

• Implement the new design or process

• Evaluate measured performance characteristics versus expectations and make design/process adjustments as necessary.

 

PHASE III: This phase will focus on the integration of multipaction mitigation technologies with military satellite systems under development, such as the successor to the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS).

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Nearly every commercial satellite or space system has an RF communication payload that could benefit from multipaction mitigation.

 

REFERENCES:

1. “Multipaction,” Wikipedia article, available at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multipaction, [Accessed 02 December 2009]

 

2. “Multipaction,” encyclopedia article, available at: http://www.microwaves101.com/encyclopedia/multipaction.cfm [Accessed 02 December 2009]

 

3. “Multipactor Calculator Version 1.61 (April 2007),” European Space Agency, Available at: http://multipactor.esa.int

 

4. “RF Breakdown Characterization,” Public Lessons Learned Entry: 0770, NASA Engineering Network, Available at: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/llis/0770.html [Accessed 02 December 2009]

 

5. Udiljak, R., D. Anderson, U. Jostell, M. Lisak, J. Puech, V.E. Semenov, “Detection of Multicarrier Multipaction using RF Power Modulation,” 4th International Workshop on Multipactor, Corona, and Passive Intermodulation in Space RF Hardware, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, 8-11 September 2003.  Available at: http://conferences.esa.int/03C26/ [Accessed 15 December 2009]

 

6. ESA for ECSS, Space Engineering: Multipaction design and test, ESA Publications Division, The Netherlands, ECSS-E-20-01a, 5 May 2003.

 

7. A.J. Marrison, R. May, J.D. Sanders, A.D. Dyne, A.D. Rawlins, and J. Petit, A Study of Multipaction in Multicarrier RF Components, AEA Technology for ESTEC, AEA Ref. No. AEA/TYKB/31761/01/RP/05 Issue 1, Culham , UK, January 1997.

 

8. V. Semenov, A. Kryazhev, D. Anderson, and M. Lisak, “Multipactor suppression in amplitude modulated radio frequency fields,” Phys. Plasmas, Vol. 8, No. 11, pp. 5034-5039, November 2001.

 

9. R. Udiljak, D. Anderson, P. Ingvarson, U. Jordan, U. Jostell, G. Li, M. Lisak, L. Lapierre, J. Puech, and J. Sombrin, “New Method for Detection of Multipaction,” IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., Vol. 31, No. 3, pp. 396-404, June 2003.

 

10. R. Kishek, Y.Y. Lau, and R. Gilgenhach, “Temporal Evolution of Multipactor Discharge,” Proc. 1995 Particle Accelerator, Conf., Vol. 3, pp. 159-1601, May 1995.

 

11. US Patent 7623004, “Method and Structure for Inhibiting Multipactor, Issued November 24, 2009.

 

KEYWORDS: multipaction; impaction; resonance; RF; communications; vacuum

 

 

 

N102-191                              TITLE: High-Performance Power Energy Device for Radio Applications

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Ground/Sea Vehicles, Materials/Processes, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: JPEO JTRS ACAT I

 

OBJECTIVE: To develop high-performance alternate energy/power devices for small form-factor military applications that is capable of meeting/exceeding 12 AH, -40 C to 55 C temperature operations. The size and weight must be comparable to the current battery design i.e, 14 inch cube and not greater than 1.0 lbs.

 

DESCRIPTION:  Military Software Defined Radio (SDR) systems are being constrained to ever-smaller form-factors while their specified performance requirements continue to increase.  Such radio systems require significantly enhanced power sources that transcend the rechargeable and non-rechargeable battery systems available today. Typical highest performing Li-ion batteries have energy storage densities in the range 140-160 W-hr/kg; Li-polymer batteries have densities in the range 130-200 W-hr/kg.  These storage capacities, while significant, limit the mission longevity of SDR-equipped personnel due to the weight in batteries they can carry with them while forward-deployed. 

 

The objective of this effort is to overcome these limitations by exploring the use of alternate energy sources and to propose an engineering design solution to extend mission longevity, reduce size, reduce weight and greatly increase both gravimetric and volumetric storage densities.   The effort will evaluate leveraging existing commercial technologies to meet JTRS performance requirements. The proposed design must be able to meet the operational environment (-40 to 55 deg C) for more than 10 hours. The proposed solution must be easy to fabricate, easy to use, have no moving parts, have the ability to be ruggedized, be soldier friendly and environmentally safe.

 

Representative technologies that could be considered include fuel cells, energy harvesting systems, kinetic energy device (wearable or attached to the radio device), radioisotope thermoelectric generators, nano-technology based energy storage device (ultra capacitor) and alternative battery chemistries (e.g. Zinc-air, Li-ion phosphate). Power sources developed under this SBIR do not need to be rechargeable as long as their gravimetric and volumetric storage densities significantly exceed current state of the art. 

 

PHASE I: Identify and determine the power technologies that could meet or has the greatest potential of meeting the JTRS performance and size requirements identified in the objective. Deliverables would include all collected laboratory data, as well as, any modeling and decision analysis data used to determine which of these alternate technology devices would move to the Phase II prototype development stage.

 

PHASE II: Based on Phase I results, build prototype high-performance power source device and characterize its performance over operationally relevant temperature ranges and load currents. 

 

PHASE III: Phase III work would involve transitioning a successful prototype high-performance power source to the manufacturing sector.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL USE APPLICATIONS:  Successful development of high-performance power sources has the potential to benefit DoD and commercial market segments alike.  DoD applications that could benefit from this technology include man-portable communications, navigation and electronic warfare systems, as well as unattended sensor systems. Commercial applications include replacement power sources/batteries for multiple consumer products. 

 

REFERENCES:

1. http://www.technologyreview.com/Energy/19777/

 

2.United States Semiconductor (Compact Nuclear Battery TM) URL-- http://www.us-semi.com/pdf/CompactNuclearBattery_July08_low.pdf

 

3.http://www.cpm.ca/september/day2_adjusted/1-EnergyStoragePortableBatteriesState-of-%20the-ArtOverview.ppt

 

KEYWORDS: Software Defined Radios (SDR), Kinetic Energy device, wearable design, battery power, environmentally safe.

 

 

 

N102-192                              TITLE: Innovative Inertial Acceleration Sensing Technologies

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Ground/Sea Vehicles, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: SSP (DRPM), TRIDENT II D5 Strategic Weapons System, ACAT I

 

RESTRICTION ON PERFORMANCE BY FOREIGN CITIZENS (i.e., those holding non-U.S. Passports):  This topic is "ITAR Restricted."  The information and materials provided pursuant to or resulting from this topic are restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 CFR Parts 120 - 130, which control the export of defense-related material and services, including the export of sensitive technical data.  Foreign Citizens may perform work under an award resulting from this topic only if they hold the “Permanent Resident Card”, or are designated as “Protected Individuals” as defined by 8 U.S.C. 1324b(a)(3). If a proposal for this topic contains participation by a foreign citizen who is not in one of the above two categories, the proposal will be rejected.

 

OBJECTIVE: Develop and demonstrate innovative next generation inertial acceleration measurement technology leading to a common accelerometer applicable for use on space constrained ballistic missile submarines that will increase accuracy, reduce size, and reduce total ownership cost of systems.

 

DESCRIPTION: Submersible Ship Ballistic Nuclear (SSBN) submarine strategic weapon systems depend on high accuracy inertial navigators to ensure precise initial launch coordinates and conditions in very dynamic environments to improve weapon’s system accuracy at terminal aim point.  Initial launch position errors are a large part of overall terminal accuracy and are propagated throughout missile flight.  Today’s high accuracy inertial navigators require precise measurement of submarine angular rate and linear acceleration in all axes.  Additionally, today’s high accuracy inertial navigators are augmented with gravity corrections since today’s inertial navigators cannot distinguish between ship’s acceleration and gravity.  These gravity corrections are derived from precise accelerometer-based gravimeter and gravity gradient measurements.

 

This topic seeks an innovative, common accelerometer technology applicable to inertial navigation, real-time gravimetry and real-time gravity gradient measurements on board submarines that reduces size and cost.  Required performance goals include; Bias stability < 0.01micro-g, Scale factor < 0.001 PPM, absolute acceleration measurement, and Noise floor < 1*10-9 g/sqrt(hz).  Therefore, research and development investment is required to replace current gravity correction mechanizations with an innovative, inertial sensing technology.

 

PHASE I: Develop a preliminary Proof Of Concept design for the proposed accelerometer sensor technology. 

 

-Develop sensor error models and simulations to evaluate the expected Proof Of Concept performance. 

 

-Validate the error model and simulation results using government approved existing data.

 

-Deliver a final report including the preliminary Proof Of Concept design, error model results, and a plan for Phase II activity.

 

PHASE II: Perform trade studies and conduct component test and evaluations. 

 

-Develop the final design for the Proof of Concept accelerometer sensor. 

 

-Fabricate one Proof of Concept Demonstration Unit (PDU). 

 

-Conduct characterization testing and validation of the PDU. 

 

-Deliver a final report containing the trade studies, component test results, Final Design Documents and PDU test results.

 

PHASE III: Productize the Proof of Concept accelerometer and integrate into a submarine deployable system.  The Proof of Concept accelerometer may be integrated into existing inertial navigators, next generation navigators or standalone navigation aiding systems. 

 

The productization approach shall meet all Navy Strategic Systems Projects Alteration (SPALT) requirements necessary to deliver new hardware to the fleet.  This will require working with current prime contractors in ensuring that requirements are met and that the hardware is compatible with existing equipment. 

 

Additionally, broader use commercialization and militarization options will be identified.

 

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: Inertial accelerometer technology is currently used to build the precise gravimeters and gravity gradiometers sold commercially for hydrocarbon and mineral exploration and the detection of subsurface structures and voids.  Gravity measurements are also used to determine melting rate of ice caps and glaciers and can reveal the addition or loss of mass (magma) from volcanic systems.  Improvements in inertial accelerometer technologies are directly applicable to improving performance and reducing the cost of gravimeters and gravity gradiometers currently sold commercially for these applications.

 

REFERENCES:

1. Jekeli C., 'Inertial Navigation Systems with Geodetic Applications', de Gruyter

 

2. Macomber G., Fernandez M., 'Inertial Guidance Engineering', Prentice Hall

 

3. Zorn A., 'A Merging Of System Technologies: All Accelerometer Inertial Navigation and Gravity Gradiometry', IEEE PLANS 2002

 

4. Difrancesco,' Advances and Challenges in the Development and Deployment of Gravity Gradiometer Systems', EGM 2007 International Workshop

 

5. Rice H., Benischek V., ' Submarine Navigation Applications of Atom Interferometry', IEEE PLANS 2008

 

KEYWORDS: accelerometer; navigation; gravimeter; gravity gradiometer; strategic; inertial