UNITED STATES SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND
12.1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)
Proposal Submission Instructions

 

Introduction:  The United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) seeks small businesses with strong research and development capabilities to pursue and commercialize technologies needed by Special Operations Forces (SOF).  The USSOCOM Program Executive Officers (PEOs) submitted the topics to the USSOCOM SBIR Program Manager (PM) as topics that may transition to an acquisition Program of Record or Concept of Operation.  In turn, the USSOCOM SBIR PM submitted the topics to the Department of Defense (DoD) for the DoD 13.1 SBIR solicitation.

 

Contact with USSOCOM:  During the pre-release period of this DoD 13.1 SBIR solicitation, any technical inquiries must be submitted in writing through sbir@socom.mil.  All inquiries must include the topic number in the subject line of the e-mail.  During the solicitation open period, all questions must be submitted through the SBIR Interactive Topic Information System (SITIS) at www.dodsbir.net/SITIS.  See Section 4.15.d of the DoD 13.1 SBIR Program Solicitation instructions for additional information on SITIS.  During the source selection period, e-mail is the only method of communication that will be used by the Government Contracting Officer to notify the submitter/proposer if they have or have not been selected for an award.

 

For additional information about electronic proposal submission, including uploading your Technical Proposal, refer to the instructions in the solicitation and the on-line help area of the DoD SBIR/STTR Submission site, or call the DoD SBIR/STTR Help Desk at 1-866-SBIRHLP (1-866-724-7457).

 

Phase I and Phase II Proposal Submission:  USSOCOM will accept Phase I proposals for the topics included in this solicitation, and select and fund for a Phase I award only those proposals considered to be superior.

 

Small business concerns awarded a Phase I contract may choose to submit a Phase II proposal not later than thirty (30) calendar days following the end of the Phase I contract.  The USSOCOM SBIR Contracting Officer will provide additional instructions to each of the Phase I awardees before the end of their respective Phase I contract completion dates.

 

Potential offerors shall submit all Phase I and Phase II proposals in accordance with the DoD Program Solicitation at www.dodsbir.net/solicitation.  The Technical Volume submission, exclusive of the Company Commercialization Report and the Cost Proposal, shall not exceed 20 pages.  Pages submitted in excess of the twenty (20) page limit will not be reviewed.

 

Offerors must complete the cost proposal using the Cost Proposal form posted on the USSOCOM section of the www.dodsbir.net/solicitation site.

 

All proposal information must be received electronically via the DOD SBIR/STTR Submission site.  To submit, proceed to http://www.dodsbir.net/submission.  Once registered, a company must prepare (and update) their Company Commercialization Report Data, prepare (and edit) Proposal Cover Sheets, complete the Cost Proposal form, and upload corresponding Technical Proposal(s).

 

Paper copies will be deemed non-responsive and will not be considered.  A complete electronic submission is required for proposal evaluation.  An electronic signature is not required on the proposal.  The DoD SBIR/STTR Submission site will present a confirmation page when a Technical Proposal file upload was received.  The upload will be available for viewing on the site within an hour.  It is in your best interest to review the upload to ensure the server received the complete, readable file.

 

Site Visits:  Site visits will not be permitted during the pre-release and open stages of the solicitation.

 

Security:  All of the topics in the solicitation are UNCLASSIFIED, and only UNCLASSIFIED proposals will be accepted.

 

Phase I Awards:  USSOCOM’s SBIR Program is small compared to the other participating DoD Components and on average awards three Phase I contracts per topic.  The maximum amount of SBIR funding for a Phase I award is $150,000 and the period of performance is typically six months.  USSOCOM does not include options in the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts.  Phase I SBIR contracts are Firm Fixed Price contracts.

 

Phase I Evaluation:  USSOCOM conducts a formal source selection process to determine which offerors should be awarded Phase I SBIR contracts.  USSOCOM evaluates Phase I proposals using the evaluation criteria specified in Section 6.0 entitled “Phase I Evaluation Criteria” of the DoD SBIR Solicitation.

 

Phase II Awards:  A Phase II award typically has a period of performance of less than 24 months and an award amount of approximately $750,000 to $1,000,000.  USSOCOM may elect to increase or decrease the Phase II award amount when it is deemed to be in its best interests.  Proposals should be based on realistic cost and time estimates and not on the maximum time (months) and dollars.  In preparing the proposal, offerors should consider that USSOCOM workload and operational tempo will preclude extensive access to Government and military personnel beyond established periodic reviews.

 

The Federal Acquisition Regulation mandate to compete federal procurements is satisfied during the Phase I source selection process.  Only those companies awarded Phase I contracts are allowed to submit Phase II proposals.

 

USSOCOM considers each Phase I feasibility study as a separate and distinct study that does not compete against each other.  The feasible solutions that result from the Phase I studies are considered technology options that can be applied when needed to solve SOF capability shortfalls.  Phase I feasibility options not immediately pursued after the conclusion of Phase I may move forward to the Phase II demonstration effort to satisfy future capability shortfalls.

 

Phase II Evaluation:  Each contractor’s Phase II proposal received will be assessed as an independent technology pursuit, and will be judged on (1) how well it meets USSOCOM requirements, and (2) considerations of programmatic risk.  Factors to determine programmatic risk include but are not limited to:

·         The contractor’s performance during Phase I

·         Scientific and technical merit and feasibility

·         Contractor’s Qualifications

·         Commercialization potential (based on the Commercialization Achievement Index and the Business Plan the company submitted during Phase I)

 

The timing of selection for a Phase II award will be dependent upon USSOCOM’s current requirements and available resources.

 

Phase III Awards:  The Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive (hereinafter “Directive”) and various Public Laws provide for protection of SBIR data rights under SBIR Phase III awards.  Per the Directive, a Phase III SBIR award is any work that derives from, extends or completes effort(s) performed under prior SBIR funding agreements, but is funded by sources other than the SBIR Program.  Thus, any contract or grant where the technology is the same as, derived from, or evolved from a Phase I or a Phase II SBIR/STTR contract and awarded to the company that was awarded the Phase I/II SBIR is a Phase III SBIR contract.  This covers any contract/grant issued as a follow-on Phase III SBIR award or any contract/grant award issued as a result of a competitive process where the awardee was a SBIR company that developed the technology as a result of a Phase I or Phase II SBIR.  USSOCOM will give SBIR Phase III status to any award that falls within the above-mentioned description, to include according SBIR Data Rights to any noncommercial technical data and/or noncommercial computer software delivered in Phase III that was developed under SBIR Phase I or II funding documents.

 

Use of Non-Government Personnel:  All proprietary material should be clearly marked and will be held in strict confidence.  Restrictive notices notwithstanding, proposals may be handled for administrative purposes by support contractor personnel who are bound by appropriate non-disclosure requirements.  Input on technical aspects of the proposals may be solicited by USSOCOM from non-Government consultants and advisors who are bound by appropriate non-disclosure requirements.  Non-Government personnel will not establish final assessments of risk, rate, or rank offerors' proposals.  These advisors are expressly prohibited from competing for USSOCOM SBIR awards.  All administrative support contractors, consultants, and advisors having access to any proprietary data will certify that they will not disclose any information pertaining to this solicitation, including any submission, the identity of any submitters, or any other information relative to this solicitation, and shall certify that they have no financial interest in any submission evaluated.  Submissions and information received in response to this solicitation constitutes the offeror’s permission to disclose that information to administrative support contractors and non-Government consultants and advisors.

 

U.S. Citizen Status:  As part of the Phase I proposal, the offeror shall verify the US citizen status of each employee who will participate in the technology effort.

 

Foreign Nationals (Foreign Citizens):  The definition of a foreign national is included in Section 3.4 of the DoD SBIR Program Solicitation.  Consistent with Section 5.4.c. (8) of the DoD Program Solicitation, the offeror shall identify all foreign nationals expected to be involved with the USSOCOM Phase I or Phase II effort to include each foreign national’s country of origin and level of involvement (identify specific tasks).  The offeror shall identify all foreign nationals in the appropriate section of the proposal.  The USSOCOM SBIR Program oftentimes pursues technologies that require companies to complete the Department of Defense Contract Security Classification Specification (DD Form 254) to protect sensitive Government Furnished Property and Government Furnished Information during the Phase II period of performance.  Offerors must ensure each individual participating in these USSOCOM technology pursuits has a personnel security clearance.

 

International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR):  The identification of foreign national involvement in a USSOCOM SBIR topic is also needed to determine if a company is ineligible for award on a USSOCOM ITAR designated topic.  A company employing a foreign national(s) on a USSOCOM ITAR topic must possess an export license to receive a SBIR Phase I or Phase II contract.

 

Inquiries concerning the USSOCOM SBIR Program should be addressed to sbir@socom.mil.

SOCOM SBIR 13.1 Topic Index

 

 

SOCOM13-001                    Nano-scale Coatings for the Protection of Electronics and Sensitive Equipment in Marine

Environments

SOCOM13-002                    Over the Horizon Underwater Communications

SOCOM13-003                    Advanced Medical Microelectronics for Use in Remote Austere Environments

SOCOM13-004                    Next Generation Portable Power Amplifier

SOCOM13-005                    Family of Sub-Sonic Ammunition

SOCOM13-006                    .50 Caliber Light Weight Precision Ammunition

SOCOM13-007                    Portable High Performance Computing and Storage


SOCOM SBIR 13.1 Topic Descriptions

 

 

SOCOM13-001                    TITLE: Nano-scale Coatings for the Protection of Electronics and Sensitive Equipment in

Marine Environments

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Materials/Processes

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: SEAL Delivery Vehicle (SDV)/Shallow Water Combat Submersible (SWCS)/Dry Com

 

The technology within this topic is restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals, their country of origin, and what tasks each would accomplish in the statement of work in accordance with section 5.4.c.(8) of the solicitation.

 

OBJECTIVE: Research and development of nano-scale coatings for protection of electronics and other sensitive items from seawater and salt fog.

 

DESCRIPTION:  Marine (seawater) environments are harsh on equipment, particularly electronics with seawater’s high conductivity leading to short circuits and increased corrosion rates.  Typically, electronics and other items that are susceptible to seawater damage are physically isolated in bags, hard containers or with waterproof conformal coatings, such as silicone, epoxy or urethane.  Containers are bulky and interfere with equipment use, while conformal coatings add significant thickness and impede heat transfer.  Furthermore, existing seawater isolation methods also interfere with the interconnectivity of different electronic assemblies.  Containers and bags must be designed to accept additional assemblies and conformal coatings often add high contact resistance and are too thick to accept a connector.  Because of this, connection points are often left uncoated and serve as failure points.  Significant numbers of expensive electronic equipment are ruined/damaged each year because of container failure or inadvertent wetting during operations.  This increases operational costs and risks mission failure due to inoperable radios, etc.  Protective waterproof coatings are already being sold in the commercial market (primarily cell phone market) as an after market product but these are limited in depth and duration.

   

Additionally, Special Warfare divers may be required to transport electronics underwater.  For this reason, the coating must be capable of protecting equipment for long durations and at depth during an underwater traverse.

    

Superhydrophobic nano-scale coatings have shown potential for protection of water-susceptible equipment such as electronics.  Superhydrophobicity is defined as having a contact angle of greater than 150 degrees, which has been demonstrated through the use of coatings with nano-scale geometric surface modification and/or surface chemical functionalization.  There are several challenges associated with the application of these coatings: adhesion with various substrates, mechanical durability (scratching, peeling, crushing of the geometric features), coating uniformity over complex geometries, economical feasibility of the application process, and allowing for the connection of different electronic assemblies without compromising the seawater resistance.  Functionally, the seawater environment also presents many challenges.  For example, coatings must possess low electrical conductivity to prevent short-circuiting, high thermal conductivity to dissipate heat, and not break down during extended exposure to underwater hydrostatic pressure.

   

PHASE I:  Thoroughly evaluate existing nano-scale water protection coating technologies and identify promising options to pursue in both salt and fresh water.  Conduct a feasibility study to predict coating performance as it relates to the number of hours a piece of protected electronics equipment could be submerged at depths ranging from 0 to 100 meters before coating failure.  Develop a detailed development plan for the most promising coating technology(ies) that includes materials, application methods and evaluation tests.

 

The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology.  The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up.  It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit.  The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary.  Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies.  Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II.

 

All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings.  The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting.  The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. 

 

PHASE II: Develop promising coating technology and demonstrate the coating at a laboratory level, considering environmental variables that may be encountered in service, such as temperature, salinity and pressure. Examine and characterize the coating and application method(s) through appropriate testing methods.  Design and develop prototype systems based on the best design evaluated by Phase I. Evaluate the effectiveness of the coating for the prototype systems under environmental conditions to include:

          • environment pressurized to 90 psi

          • seawater environment to 100 meters

          • water temperatures between 32-95 degrees F

 

PHASE III DUAL USE APLICATIONS: Refine and mature coating process based on Phase II testing results.  Demonstrate the coating on complex electronics and materials that are representative of those to be seen in the field.   Conduct and report testing to evaluate coating performance and durability, considering appropriate environmental variables such as temperature, salinity and pressure.  This technology is applicable to the commercial electronics industry, where water protection could be useful (cell phones, radios and other consumer electronics).  Furthermore, this manner of water protection may also be applied to a variety of different substrates.

 

REFERENCES: 

1. Chinn, J.; Helmrich, F.; Guenther, R.; Wiltse, M.; Hurst, K.; and Ashurst, W. “Durable Super-hydrophic Nano-composite Films. NSTI-Nanotech 2010; 1: 612-615.

 

2. Brinker, C.J.; Branson, E.; Kissel, D.J.; Cook, A.; and Singh, S. “Superhyrophobic Coating”. 2008 R&D 100 award entry form, Sandia National Laboratories.

 

3. Branson et al. “Preparation of Hydrophobic Coatings”. US patent 7485343, 2009.

 

4. Zhai et al. “Superhydrophobic Coatings”. US patent 2006/0029808, 2006.

 

5. Doshi, D.A.; Shah, P.B.; Singh, S.; Branson, E.D.; Malanoski, A.P.; Watkins, E.B.; Majewski, J.;van  Swol, F.; and Brinker, C.J. “Investigating the Interface of Superhydrophobic Surfaces in Contact with Water”. Langmuir 2005; 21: 7805-7811.

 

KEYWORDS: Materials/Processes, Electronics, Waterproofing, Hydrophobic, Electronic protection, Nano-composite, Coating, Waterproofing

 

 

 

SOCOM13-002                    TITLE: Over the Horizon Underwater Communications

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Sensors

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Hostile Fire - Tagging, Tracking, and Locating

 

The technology within this topic is restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals, their country of origin, and what tasks each would accomplish in the statement of work in accordance with section 5.4.c.(8) of the solicitation.

 

OBJECTIVE:  Communicate from a minimum depth of three (3) meters underwater to overhead SATCOM receiver.

 

DESCRIPTION:   Most maritime Tagging, Tracking, and Locating devices operate using acoustic sensors or need to break the surface of the water to communicate.  Acoustic devices produce a detectable acoustic signature and are limited on the range between the tracking device and the receiver.  Tracking devices that require being above the surface to communicate present a visual indicator of the tracking operation.  The focus of this SBIR topic is to develop the capability to make a data link from below the surface of the water to communicate with an overhead SATCOM receiver in near real time.

              

PHASE I:  Conduct a feasibility study to develop an underwater tracking device capable of tracking and transmitting in near real time the location, speed, and heading of the device without breaking the surface of the water.  The objective of the Phase I feasibility study is to determine what is in the art of the possible to maximize the following performance parameters realizing that only the minimum performance requirements are specified:

a.  Communicate from a minimum depth of 3 meters underwater to an overhead SATCOM receiver in the 1616-1626 MHz, L-Band range

b.  Operate unattended for a minimum of 30 days communicating with satellites in a low earth orbit transmitting and receiving at least once a day

c.  Transmit and receive a minimum of 250 bytes per Short Burst Data data message at a minimum of 2.2 Kbit/s

d.  Maximum size is 6"x4"x1"

e.  Operate in both salt and fresh water environments

 

The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology.  The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up.  It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit.  The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary.  Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies.  Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II.

 

All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings.  The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting.  The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. 

 

PHASE II:  Demonstrate a prototype positioned three (3) meters underwater to connect and send data to SATCOM in both salt and fresh water environments at or better than the performance parameters described in Phase I above.

 

PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  Joint tracking capabilities for Federal and DoD organizations.  Commercial underwater communication applications.

 

REFERENCES:  None

 

KEYWORDS: Underwater, Tagging, Tracking, Locating, Over the Horizon, Communication

 

 

 

SOCOM13-003                    TITLE: Advanced Medical Microelectronics for Use in Remote Austere Environments

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Biomedical, Electronics

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC), Casualty Evacuation Set

 

OBJECTIVE:  To leverage the latest in advanced technologies (e.g., nanotechnology, microelectromechanical systems, and lab-on-a-chip) to develop an Advanced Medical Microelectronics platform which provides advanced functionality beyond that available in current TCCC medical electronic devices in a single, small, lightweight device for use in remote, austere combat and humanitarian operations.

 

DESCRIPTION:  Current Special Operations Forces (SOF) advanced medical diagnostic equipment is currently composed of multiple devices.  The focus of this topic is to develop an innovative solution which advances the capabilities and functionality provided within current medical devices in a single platform that is significantly smaller and lighter weight for use in combat operations and provides the medic with additional diagnostic equipment not currently available on the battlefield.  Ultrasonographic scanners (ultrasound), capnography monitors, blood pressure monitors, pulse oximeters (pulse oximetry) and EKG monitors (electrocardiography), video laryngoscope, and defibrillators are all standards used in today’s intensive care units, where they are usually separate devices with their own power source and their own monitor screen. There are “almost-all-in-one” medical packages on the market that include some of these devices, with all but ultrasound and defibrillator deemed to be portable Intensive Care Unit systems. The lightest system presently available weighs 40 pounds with a volume of 3,234 cubic inches (22”x21”x7”) and is not suitable for the battlefield.  Innovative research and development is needed and includes leveraging advanced technologies (e.g., nanotechnology, microelectromechanical systems, lab-on-a-chip technologies and secure wireless data transfer) to achieve the required level of capability integration and miniaturization (size and weight reduction).   Simple integration of existing medical devices will not provide the level of minaturatization required for transport and use during combat operations. Significant innovation of technologies will be required to develop this stand-alone medical device to include the following:  high resolution imaging, improved accuracy when in unstable or high motion transport, reduced power requirements or alternative means of power sourcing, simultaneous use on multiple patients, and advanced display system to provide a user friendly interface to convey and transfer all relevant patient data.  Development of such a device has significant advantages over currently available commercial products and the potential to alter the commercial and military medical technology markets.

 

PHASE I:  The objective of this feasibility study is to exploit advanced technologies for the development of advanced medical diagnostic capabilities in a single miniaturized device platform for SOF use in remote and austere locations.  The device must provide a suite of medical monitoring/diagnostic capabilities in a single device that significantly reduces the size, weight, volume, and power requirements of current TCCC medical devices.  Study considerations include, but should not be limited to, the following capabilities and characteristics:

 

a. Diagnostic Capabilities:

     (1) Ultrasound

     (2) Capnography

     (3) Blood Pressure (non-invasive)

     (4) Pulse Oximetry

     (4) Noninvasive Hemoglobin

     (6) Various Lead Electrocardiography Monitoring

     (7) Defibrillation

     (8) Video Laryngoscope

 

b. Device Characteristics:

     (1) Portable (small and light enough for one SOF operator/medic to comfortably carry)

          i. Dimensions - 10.5"W x 9"H x 8"D maximum (Desired: 10.5"W x 8"H x 4" D or smaller)

          ii. Weight - 12 lbs. maximum (Desired:  6 lbs. or less)

     (2) Remote Monitoring of three or more patients

          i. Simultaneous monitoring of vital signs

          ii. Distance – 25 meters line of sight from the combat medic 

     (3) Operating Time – 7 or more hours of patient monitoring on battery

     (4) Display – suitable screen size to discern patients’ vital signs in all lighting conditions

     (4) Interoperability with SOF field computing devices

     (5) Feasibility of a single device -- if a single device is presently not feasible, propose the minimum number of devices possible using advanced technologies.

 

The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to exploit advanced technologies to design a single medical device to replace multiple medical/diagnostic devices available today.  The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up.  It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit.  The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary.  Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies.  Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II.

 

All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings.  The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting.  The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. 

 

PHASE II:  During Phase II, the vendor will develop a novel, integrated electronic monitoring prototype system that meets the characteristics defined in the Phase I description above.  This prototype system will undergo both laboratory and limited field testing to drive its development and its ultimate utility for SOF operations.

 

PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  Commercial applications for this advanced medical capability are first responders, non-governmental organizations, and hospitals in triage and emergency room settings.  This phase will align with consumer product markets and industrial protective services for commercial variants of the advanced monitoring system.  At the completion of this phase, the system shall be fully approved and ready for use within the intended operational environment.

 

REFERENCES:  None

 

KEYWORDS: Medical electronics, microelectronics, ultrasound, capnography, non-invasive blood pressure, pulse oximetry, various lead electrocardiography monitoring, and defibrillation

 

 

 

SOCOM13-004                    TITLE: Next Generation Portable Power Amplifier

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Electronics

 

The technology within this topic is restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals, their country of origin, and what tasks each would accomplish in the statement of work in accordance with section 5.4.c.(8) of the solicitation.

 

OBJECTIVE:  Develop a next generation light-weight, high-efficiency, man-portable power amplifier for communications.

 

DESCRIPTION:  Special Operations Forces (SOF) currently must carry multiple power amplifiers and associated batteries for all required communications equipment to conduct their missions.  These portable power amplifiers and batteries add weight, heat, and bulk to an already burdened SOF operator.  Technology advances have realized incremental improvements in each of these three factors but an ideal innovative solution that considers all three factors as a group has not been pursued.  The purpose of this technology pursuit is to accelerate the reduction of weight; heat and bulk SOF carry by developing an integrated portable power amplifier and battery pack as a system of integrated components.

 

PHASE I:  Conduct a feasibility study to reduce weight, heat and bulk SOF warfighters currently carry by developing an integrated portable power amplifier and battery pack system that meets or exceeds the following minimum performance requirements.  The objective of the Phase I feasibility study is to determine what is in the art of the possible to maximize the performance parameters realizing that only the minimum performance parameters or minimum performance ranges are specified: 

         a.  2-20 watt selectable transmit power

         b.  30-3000 MHz frequency range

         c.  Overall weight of 2.5 pounds or less

         d.  24 hour or greater operational life on a single charge

         e.  Compatible with most (if not all) field communications equipment used by SOF teams

         f.  Desired solution should be modular and require no external cooling provisions

         g.  MIL-STD-810G entitled "Environmental Engineering Considerations and Laboratory Tests"

         h.  MIL-STD-461F entitled "Requirements for the Control of Electromagnetic Interference Characteristics of

Subsystems and Equipment”

         i.  Sealed and weather resistant

         j.  Standard 50 ohm Threaded Neill-Concelman (TNC) and Subminiature version A (SMA) connectors

 

Below are representative examples of radios/interfaces the portable power amplifier should support:

                - Thales AN/PRC-148 MBITR

                - Thales AN/PRC-152

                - Harris RF5800

                - SINCGARS/HAVEQUICK support

 

Below is a current system with similar capabilities that the portable power amplifier should support:

                - AMTI A-320 20W Amplifier (30-512 MHz only)

 

Perform an analysis of the tradeoffs in terms of size, weight, power, heat, and battery life of the entire integrated power amplifier and battery pack system.

 

The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology.  The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up.  It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit.  The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary.  Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies.  Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II.

 

All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings.  The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting.  The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. 

 

PHASE II:  Develop a prototype system that integrates both the power amplifier and batteries into a modular package. Demonstrate the performance characteristics of the system on several common field radios used by SOF teams.

 

PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  Commercial portable communications applications.

 

REFERENCES: 

1.  MIL-STD-810G entitled "Environmental Engineering Considerations and Laboratory Tests" dated 31 October 2008

 

2.  MIL-STD-461F entitled "Requirements for the Control of Electromagnetic Interference Characteristics of Subsystems and Equipment" dated 10 December 2007

 

KEYWORDS: Amplifier, transmitter, radio, communications

 

 

 

SOCOM13-005                    TITLE: Family of Sub-Sonic Ammunition

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Electronics, Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: MK 17 and Precision Sniper Rifle

 

The technology within this topic is restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals, their country of origin, and what tasks each would accomplish in the statement of work in accordance with section 5.4.c.(8) of the solicitation.

 

OBJECTIVE:  Develop a family of sub-sonic ammunition that has extremely tight velocity standard deviations, is clean burning (leaves no un-burned propellant in the weapons receiver), will function in gas operated weapons and will be cost effective.  Successful completion of this SBIR technology pursuit will improve the survivability of Special Operations Forces and other Governmental Agencies supporting the Global War on Terror during covert operations.

 

DESCRIPTION:  Today, there is no sub-sonic ammunition currently type classified for use in the calibers provided by any DoD Service.  Making Sub-Sonic ammunitions available to conventional forces with improved accuracy, reduced flash, the ability to function a weapon reliably and also be cost effective compared to other premium quality rounds of a similar caliber will provide a combat overmatch against hostile enemy forces.  Sub-Sonic ammunition has been in use since WWII and functions well in small caliber suppressed pistols only.  Cartridges for covert operations have been limited to 5.56x45 and 7.62x51 calibers with each having its own issues.  Current rifle rounds of sub-sonic design experience significant accuracy problems due to excessive deviations in velocity.  These deviations are much more pronounced in lower velocity sub-sonic rounds than are higher velocity projectiles thus significantly reducing the effective range.  There are many contributing factors associated with currently fielded sub-sonic cartridges.  First, they are not overly accurate due to large standard deviations in velocity from using a full sized cartridge case with a dramatically reduced propellant charge and a very heavy bullet necessary to reduce velocity below 1,100 Feet Per Second (FPS).  The inconsistent propellant distribution prohibits uniform ignition, thus significantly altering the burn profile.  Second, the reduced propellant charge creates lower pressures which makes consistent and complete case mouth obtuation (chamber sealing) difficult and makes it hard to get a clean burn of the propellant causing rapid fouling of the weapon.  Third, no current sub-sonic rifle round will consistently cycle the action on gas operated weapons.  In the past, no viable solution existed for sub-sonic ammunition but new technologies such as polymer cased ammunition may provide viable solutions.  For example, polymer can be formed to tailor the internal volume of the case to the amount of propellant needed to achieve the desired sub-sonic velocities while generating a complete burn of the propellant. This is accomplished by removing the filler and providing a consistent powder volume of sufficient density to produce a reliable and consistent powder burn.  Polymer also obtuates at lower pressures thus completely sealing the chamber thereby reducing shot to shot velocity standard deviations and improving accuracy.  Resolving the internal volume issue and improving sealing in a sub-sonic round should also produce adequate port pressure to function a gas operated weapon.

 

PHASE I:  Conduct a feasibility study to determine if a sub-sonic concept/capability can be achieved for the 5.56mm, 7.62mm, and .338 caliber rounds.  The feasibility study should determine if the following minimum performance parameters can be achieved and exceeded.  The feasibility study should determine what is in the art of the possible that will maximize the following performance parameters realizing that only the minimum performance parameters are specified.  The sub-sonic round must:

          a.  hold a velocity standard deviation of 14 or less significantly increasing accuracy and engagement range.

          b.  be clean burning with no unburned propellant in the gas system/receiver or in the weapon after repeated firing.  No unburned propellant is the best available metric given no current military standard exists to baseline against.

          c.  be flash suppressed to where, in a suppressed weapon, no flash is visible.

          d.  provide a minimum 40 decibel reduction in sound from full velocity ammunition in a suppressed weapon.

          e.  have no greater than a threshold of 30 FPS shift in velocity from lot to lot while in production with an objective of 15 FPS shift.

          f.  maintain accuracy of 1.25 Minute of Angle (MOA) out to 300 yards with no singled shot group exceeding 1.5 MOA for  a total 10 ten shot groups (5 groups fired through 2 different weapons). 

          g. stay sub-sonic at all temperature extremes (-40F to 165F) and functions in all USSOCOM weapons in that caliber.

          h.  be less than or equal to other quality ammunition for each of the respective calibers.

 

The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology.  The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up.  It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit.  The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary.  Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies.  Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II.

 

All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings.  The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting.  The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. 

 

PHASE II:  Demonstrate sub-sonic 5.56mm, 7.62mm, and .338 caliber round prototypes to meet the performance parameters determined to be achievable during the Phase I feasibility study.

 

PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  Transition into full rate production of these calibers will provide superior covert and stealth capabilities to Department of Defense Components, Law Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security, Special Weapons and Tactics Teams.

 

REFERENCES:  None

 

KEYWORDS: Sub-Sonic, Ammunition

 

 

 

SOCOM13-006                    TITLE: .50 Caliber Light Weight Precision Ammunition

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Weapons

 

ACQUISITION PROGRAM: Heavy Sniper

 

The technology within this topic is restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals, their country of origin, and what tasks each would accomplish in the statement of work in accordance with section 5.4.c.(8) of the solicitation.

 

OBJECTIVE:  Design, develop, and demonstrate an innovative .50 caliber round that is at least 30% or greater lighter than the current .50 caliber ammunition that users of MK-15 and M107 weapons must carry, that also improves the accuracy over the current brass cased Department of Defense Identification Code A606 round using the MK-211 projectile, and to develop a ballistically matched non-dud producing training round that allows personnel to improve their sniper skills on scored ranges while reducing overall procurement and sustainment costs.  In addition, this will substantially reduce logistics costs given the 30% minimum weight reduction (approximately 60lbs per 1,000 rounds).

 

DESCRIPTION:  The A606 round is the current round of choice for sniper operations using the M107 or MK-15 weapons platforms.  The A606 round was designed as an anti-materiel munitions, is not overly accurate (estimated 2 Minute of Angle), and is heavy (every two rounds weigh approximately a pound).  (For example, the M107 weighs 36 pounds and 50 rounds of ammunition weigh 25 additional pounds for a total of 61 pounds).  Additionally, USSOCOM needs a more accurate MK-211 like round that is non dud producing so that it can be fired on normal sniper ranges to improve shooting skills on one of the most difficult weapons platforms to employ due to the extreme long ranges the weapons are designed to engage.   Current technologies such as polymer cased ammunition have shown documented accuracy enhancements over brass cases.   Recent evaluations have determined that new industry partners have overcome the obstacles previously associated with polymer cased ammunition and can now produce highly reliable ammunition products that allow for the full realization of the technology.

 

PHASE I:  Conduct a feasibility study to determine if a MK-211 like round (both dud and non dud training variant) can meet or exceed the following minimum performance improvements of the current A606 round.  The objective of the Phase I feasibility study is to determine what state of the art ammunition technologies can be applied to this round to maximize the following performance improvements realizing that only the minimum performance improvements are specified:

          a.  Reduce the weight by a minimum of 30% or greater.

          b. Improve accuracy to a minimum of 1.25 Minute of Angle at ranges out to 1500 yards.

          c.  Meet all applicable safety requirements in temperatures ranging from -40 degrees F to

+ 165 degrees F. 

          d. Realize a cost per round in full rate production to be equal to or less than the cost of the existing A606 MK-211 round.

 

The training round should achieve a ballistic match to the improved MK-211 round allowing users to dramatically improve their skills with .50 caliber weapons platforms by allowing use on a non-dud producing scorable ranges.

 

The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology.  The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up.  It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit.  The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary.  Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies.  Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II.

 

All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings.  The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting.  The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. 

 

PHASE II:  Design and demonstrate dud and non dud MK-211 like round prototypes to meet the performance characteristics determined to be achievable as the result of the Phase I feasibility study.

 

PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  Services, other Department of Defense Components, Law Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security, Special Weapons and Tactics Teams.

 

REFERENCES:  None

 

KEYWORDS: Light Weight .50 Caliber, Precision Ammunition, Sniper Ammunition

 

 

 

SOCOM13-007                    TITLE: Portable High Performance Computing And Storage

 

TECHNOLOGY AREAS: Information Systems, Electronics

 

The technology within this topic is restricted under the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR), which controls the export and import of defense-related material and services. Offerors must disclose any proposed use of foreign nationals, their country of origin, and what tasks each would accomplish in the statement of work in accordance with section 5.4.c.(8) of the solicitation.

 

OBJECTIVE:  Develop a light-weight, low-power man-portable, integrated, non-volatile memory storage and computation device.

 

DESCRIPTION:  Traditional and Special Operations Forces (SOF) multi-intelligence collection and analysis activities require the storage and processing of large quantities of data, often in the Terabyte (TB) range. Traditional means of storing and processing the data involve either large, stationary computation and storage devices with correspondingly high power and cooling requirements, or a fast and reliable communications link to an off-site location. Highly mobile activities often lack such resources.

 

Technologies that exist today include Solid State Drives with capacities in the 1TB range and Graphics Processing Units (GPU) capable of 2 TeraFLOPS (Floating-Point Operations Per Second) and programmable for general purpose as well as scientific computing. Neither technology is suitable as-is due to size or power requirements.  Additionally, there is currently no integrated product that combines high capacity non-volatile memory storage with high performance general purpose and scientific computing capabilities in a low-power, man-portable package.

 

PHASE I:  Conduct a feasibility study to develop a single device that can meet or exceed the following minimum performance parameters.  The objective of this feasibility study is to determine what is in the art of the possible to develop and integrate the following storage and computational components into single or modular device:

a.  16 Terabyte or greater of non-volatile storage

b.  1 TeraFLOPS or more of computational capability

c.  Consume 12 Watts of power or less

d.  Battery operated or other power source that is compatible with Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) limitations in a man portable package

e.  24 hours or greater operational life on a single charge

f.  General purpose and scientific computing capabilities

g.  Man-portable package

h.  May be modular and stackable

i.   A standard laptop should be able to access the storage component

j.  A standard laptop should be able to control and monitor the computational component (but is not an integral part of the processing chain)

k.  Investigate the possibility of an order of magnitude reduction in size, weight, and power than a typical external 3.5" hard drive 

l.  Investigate reducing thermal signature when compared to current levels of heat generated by computing systems

 

Perform an analysis of the tradeoffs in terms of size, weight, power, battery life of the entire system.

 

The objective of this USSOCOM Phase I SBIR effort is to conduct and document the results of a thorough feasibility study to investigate what is in the art of the possible within the given trade space that will satisfy a needed technology.  The feasibility study should investigate all known options that meet or exceed the minimum performance parameters specified in the Phase I topic write-up.  It should also address the risks and potential payoffs of the innovative technology options that are investigated and recommend the option that best achieves the objective of this technology pursuit.  The funds obligated on the resulting Phase I SBIR contracts are to be used for the sole purpose of conducting a thorough and comprehensive feasibility study using scientific experiments and laboratory studies as necessary.  Operational prototypes will not be developed with USSOCOM SBIR funds during Phase I feasibility studies.  Operational prototypes developed with other than SBIR funds that are provided at the end of Phase I feasibility studies will not be considered in deciding what firm(s) will be invited to Phase II.

 

All offerors shall include as part of the Phase I proposal the transportation costs for two round trips to travel to Tampa, Florida, for two separate meetings.  The first travel requirement shall be the Phase I Kick-Off meeting and the second travel requirement shall be for the Phase I Out-Brief meeting.  The Principal Investigator and all other representatives needed to discuss the offeror's technology pursuit shall attend the Phase I Kick-Off and Out-Brief meetings. 

 

PHASE II:  Develop an integrated prototype system that incorporates both the storage and computational components into a single or modular device.  Demonstrate the performance characteristics of the prototype system including the laptop interface on a typical large data processing application.

 

PHASE III DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS:  Commercial applications in data centers, video game consoles, medical, and other scientific fields.

 

REFERENCES: 

1.  Fusion I/O ioDrive2 Data Sheet, http://www.fusionio.com/data-sheets/iodrive2.

 

2.  “PEPSC: A Power-Efficient Processor for Scientific Computing”, G Dasika et. al, 20th Intl Conference on Parallel Architectures and Compilation Techniques (PACT), October 2011, http://web.eecs.umich.edu/~tnm/trev_test/papersPDF/2011.10.PEPSC-a%20power%20efficient.pdf.

 

KEYWORDS: Solid State Drive, flash memory, High Performance Computing, storage, Graphics Processing Units, General Purpose Graphic Processing Units